Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following problem. Am trying to make a polymorphic call and the result would depend on the variable that changes value depending on the underlying class. Tried different things however it doesn't work. Please let me know what should be changed. Problem is that although c.w reads both the local variable w, which is defaulted to 0 and reads the one from appropriate class it always defaults to 0. Here is the code:

class Cycle{
    private int w = 0;
    public void move(){
        System.out.println("Cycle moving");
    }
    public int wheels(Cycle c){
        switch (c.w){

            case 1:     return 1; 
            case 2:     return 2;
            case 3:     return 3;
            default:    return 0;
        }
    }
}
class Unicycle extends Cycle{
    public int w = 1;
    public void go(){
        System.out.println("Unicycle go");
    }
}
class Bicycle extends Cycle{
    public int w = 2;
    public void go(){
        System.out.println("Bicycle go");
    }
}
class Tricycle extends Cycle{
    public int w = 3;
    public void go(){
        System.out.println("Tricycle go");
    }
}

public class TestCycle {

    public static void ride(Cycle c){
        c.move();
        int now = c.wheels(c);
        System.out.println(now);

    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Bicycle b = new Bicycle();
        ride(b);
        Unicycle u = new Unicycle();
        ride(u);
        Tricycle t = new Tricycle();
        ride(t);
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
There is something really bad in your code: you redeclare int w in your subclasses. It's called shadowing (or hiding) a variable. I don't understand why the designer of the language even allowed that. –  toto2 Jan 13 '12 at 14:52
1  
Also it looks odd that your 3 subclasses have a go method; they should be subclasses of something that has a go method. –  toto2 Jan 13 '12 at 14:54
    
@toto2 it work because Cycle.w is private, and so it's unacessible from its inheritors; hence, no shadowing. –  Viruzzo Jan 13 '12 at 14:55
    
@Viruzzo OK, but it really shouldn't be private. By the way, it works no matter what the access level is; it just leads to massive confusion. –  toto2 Jan 13 '12 at 14:57
    
@toto2 yes of course, I didn't want to justify it by any means! –  Viruzzo Jan 13 '12 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem (well one of them) is that you are redefining the class variable 'w' in each of your subclasses. Define it one as a member of 'Cycle' and have each subclass set it correctly in their constructors.

class Cycle{
    protected int w;
    public void move(){
        System.out.println("Cycle moving");
    }
    public int wheels(){
        return w;
    }
}

class Unicycle extends Cycle{
    public Unicycle() {
        w = 1;
    }
     public void go(){
        System.out.println("Unicycle go");
    }
}

Or you can define an abstract method called 'wheels()' in the superclass and override it in the subclasses. It's a matter of taste.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case w would have to be protected and not private; otherwise the subclasses can't access it. –  Poindexter Jan 13 '12 at 15:05
    
Thanks Poindexter, i did just copy and paste the OPs code –  brain Jan 13 '12 at 15:23
    
Is there any way to do it without constructors? I'd rather prefer to have a polymorphic method. thank you –  aretai Jan 13 '12 at 15:58
    
@aretai Define a method in the superclass called wheels() and override it in the subclasses. –  brain Jan 15 '12 at 18:35

the wheels method should be more like

public int getWheelCount(){
   return this.w;
}

You invoke it on the instance itself, you don't need to pass an argument. If the current instance is a Tricycle, the method will return 3, etc...

share|improve this answer
    
Except that it's private, so they can't access it. –  Viruzzo Jan 13 '12 at 14:56
    
Viruzzo, thanx, I can't believe I missed that. –  hvgotcodes Jan 13 '12 at 14:57
    
I tried that, but it still return 0 that is the w from Cycle. Can you show full code? Thank you –  aretai Jan 13 '12 at 16:19

Since Cycle.w is private, it's not visible from its inheritors. This means that for example Tricycle.w it's not the "same" variable, and it's not visible in Cycle (that's why you always get 0). You have to make Cycle.w at least protected, then remove w from all subclasses, and set its value in each subclass's constructor to what you want.

share|improve this answer

It's probably not the answer you are looking for, but the following works. Please give more details on what you are trying to do.

public abstract class Cycle {
   protected int nWheels;
   protected String goText;

   // no constructor.

   public void go() {
     System.out.println(goText);
   }

   public int wheels() {
     return nWheels;
  }
}
...

public class Unicycle extends Cycle {

   public Unicycle() {
      nWheels = 1;
      goText = "Unicycle go";
   }
}

Note that I made Cycle abstract because I don't want it to ever be instantiated.

EDIT:

public static int getNumberOfWheels(Cycle cycle) {
   return cycle.wheels();
}

which is obviously not very useful since a simple call to cycle.wheels() would do the same as calling this function.

I'm not sure why you want to avoid constructors. Maybe you should write the exact question you are trying to answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok yes it works. Do you have any idea how to make it without constructors for each class and only with appropriate methods? –  aretai Jan 13 '12 at 16:04
    
I had the feeling you were trying to do something else. See my edit. –  toto2 Jan 13 '12 at 16:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.