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Is there a way in handlebars JS to incorporate logical operators into the standard handlebars.js conditional operator? Something like this:

{{#if section1 || section2}}
.. content
{{/if}}

I know I could write my own helper, but first I'd like to make sure I'm not reinventing the wheel.

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15 Answers

up vote 147 down vote accepted

This is possible by 'cheating' with a block helper. This probably goes against the Ideology of the people who developed Handlebars.

Handlebars.registerHelper('ifCond', function(v1, v2, options) {
  if(v1 === v2) {
    return options.fn(this);
  }
  return options.inverse(this);
});

You can then call the helper in the template like this

{{#ifCond v1 v2}}
    {{v1}} is equal to {{v2}}
{{else}}
    {{v1}} is not equal to {{v2}}
{{/ifCond}}
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14  
This does go against the logicless nature of Handlebars / Moustache, but is certainly useful nonetheless, thanks! –  Bala Clark Jun 29 '12 at 11:09
1  
That really helped. Thank you. –  Azee Jan 18 '13 at 12:26
2  
Note that this simply doesn't work with bound properties (read, Ember bindings). It's fine with literal values, but doesn't resolve model properties (tested with Ember 1.0.0-rc.8 and Handlebars 1.0.0), and registerBoundHelper can't deal with Handlebars syntax. The workaround is to create a custom view: stackoverflow.com/questions/18005111/… –  Warren Seine Aug 29 '13 at 14:41
    
In Ember you should create a computed property for the value instead and use that property in your template. That way the bindings will work correctly. –  Karl-Johan Sjögren Sep 21 '13 at 16:12
    
See my answer for a simple if equal helper supporting bound properties. –  devongovett Jan 12 at 7:51
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Taking the solution one step further. This adds the compare operator.

Handlebars.registerHelper('ifCond', function (v1, operator, v2, options) {

    switch (operator) {
        case '==':
            return (v1 == v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '===':
            return (v1 === v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '<':
            return (v1 < v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '<=':
            return (v1 <= v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '>':
            return (v1 > v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '>=':
            return (v1 >= v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '&&':
            return (v1 && v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        case '||':
            return (v1 || v2) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
        default:
            return options.inverse(this);
    }
});

Use it in a template like this:

{{#ifCond var1 '==' var2}}
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This is a cool extension. Thanks! –  Nick Kitto May 12 '13 at 21:34
11  
don't forget about '||' and '&&'. I added these cases and they're very useful. –  Jason Jun 20 '13 at 17:38
9  
Being a noob to handlebars one thing that wasn't clear is that you have to pass the operator as a string or else the compiler will error out while tokenizing your template. {{#ifCond true '==' false}} –  Joe Holloway Jul 11 '13 at 20:11
    
If I am using ember with rails, where should I define this? which file should I place this code? Thanks. –  lionel Sep 4 '13 at 4:46
    
@Jason Those would be helpful. Would you mind adding them to the example code? –  bfcoder Sep 5 '13 at 17:56
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Improved solution that basically work with any binary operator (at least numbers, strings doesn't work well with eval, TAKE CARE OF POSSIBLE SCRIPT INJECTION IF USING A NON DEFINED OPERATOR WITH USER INPUTS):

Handlebars.registerHelper("ifCond",function(v1,operator,v2,options) {
    switch (operator)
    {
        case "==":
            return (v1==v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "!=":
            return (v1!=v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "===":
            return (v1===v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "!==":
            return (v1!==v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "&&":
            return (v1&&v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "||":
            return (v1||v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "<":
            return (v1<v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case "<=":
            return (v1<=v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case ">":
            return (v1>v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        case ">=":
         return (v1>=v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);

        default:
            return eval(""+v1+operator+v2)?options.fn(this):options.inverse(this);
    }
});
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how would you use this in a template? especially the options.fn part? –  qodeninja Feb 10 at 22:37
    
{{ifCond val1 '||' val2}}true{{else}}false{{/if}} it returns options.fn (true, the ifCond clause) if its correct, otherwise it returns options.inverse (false, the else clause) if incorrect. –  Nick Kitto Mar 31 at 20:37
    
Due to the caveat mentioned about script injection, I would strongly recommend against using this helper. In a large codebase this could easily be responsible for a nasty security problem down the line –  DustMason Apr 23 at 21:28
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taking this one up a notch, for those of you who live on the edge.

gist: https://gist.github.com/akhoury/9118682 Demo: http://jsbin.com/jeqesisa/7/edit?html,js,output

Handlebars Helper: {{#xif EXPRESSION}} {{else}} {{/xif}}

a helper to execute an IF statement with any expression

  1. EXPRESSION is a properly escape String
  2. Yes you NEED to properly escape the string literals or just alternate single and double quotes
  3. to access any global function or property you should use window.functionName() instead of just functionName()
  4. this example assumes you passed this context to your handlebars template( {name: 'Sam', age: '20' } ), notice age is a string, just for so I can demo parseInt() later in this post

Usage:

<p>
 {{#xif " this.name == 'Sam' && this.age === '12' " }}
   BOOM
 {{else}}
   BAMM
 {{/xif}}
</p>

Output

<p>
  BOOM
</p>

JavaScript: (it depends on another helper- keep reading)

 Handlebars.registerHelper("xif", function (expression, options) {
    return Handlebars.helpers["x"].apply(this, [expression, options]) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
  });

Handlebars Helper: {{x EXPRESSION}}

A helper to execute javascript expressions

  1. EXPRESSION is a properly escape String
  2. Yes you NEED to properly escape the string literals or just alternate single and double quotes
  3. to access any global function or property you should use window.functionName() instead of just functionName(), notice how I had to use window.parseInt() instead of parseInt()
  4. this example assumes you passed this context to your handlebars template( {name: 'Sam', age: '20' } ), age is a string for demo purpose, it can be anything..

Usage:

<p>Url: {{x "'hi' + this.name + ', ' + window.location.href + ' <---- this is your href,' + ' your Age is:' + window.parseInt(this.age, 10)"}}</p>

Output:

<p>Url: hi Sam, http://example.com <---- this is your href, your Age is: 20</p>

JavaScript:

This looks a little large because I expanded syntax and commented over almost each line for clarity purposes

Handlebars.registerHelper("x", function (expression, options) {
  var fn = function(){}, result;

  // in a try block in case the expression have invalid javascript
  try {
    // create a new function using Function.apply, notice the capital F in Function
    fn = Function.apply(
      this,
      [
        'window', // or add more '_this, window, a, b' you can add more params if you have references for them when you call fn(window, a, b, c);
        'return ' + expression + ';' // edit that if you know what you're doing
      ]
    );
  } catch (e) {
    console.warn('[warning] {{x ' + expression + '}} is invalid javascript', e);
  }

  // then let's execute this new function, and pass it window, like we promised
  // so you can actually use window in your expression
  // i.e expression ==> 'window.config.userLimit + 10 - 5 + 2 - user.count' //
  // or whatever
  try {
    // if you have created the function with more params
    // that would like fn(window, a, b, c)
    result = fn.bind(this)(window);
  } catch (e) {
    console.warn('[warning] {{x ' + expression + '}} runtime error', e);
  }
  // return the output of that result, or undefined if some error occured
  return result;
});

Moar

if you want access upper level scope, this one is slightly different, the expression is the JOIN of all arguments, usage: say context data looks like this:

// data
{name: 'Sam', age: '20', address: { city: 'yomomaz' } }

// in template
// notice how the expression wrap all the string with quotes, and even the variables
// as they will become strings by the time they hit the helper
// play with it, you will immediately see the errored expressions and figure it out

{{#with address}}
    {{z '"hi " + "' ../this.name '" + " you live with " + "' city '"' }}
{{/with}}

Javascript:

Handlebars.registerHelper("z", function () {
    var options = arguments[arguments.length - 1]
    delete arguments[arguments.length - 1];
    return Handlebars.helpers["x"].apply(this, [Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0).join(''), options]);
});

Handlebars.registerHelper("zif", function () {
    var options = arguments[arguments.length - 1]
    delete arguments[arguments.length - 1];
    return Handlebars.helpers["x"].apply(this, [Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0).join(''), options]) ? options.fn(this) : options.inverse(this);
});
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This is great. Handlebars can't tell you what to do :) –  lemiant Mar 11 at 14:47
    
:) thanks, I updated the gist a little to add few more goodies (not directly related to this SO question - but in the spirit of doing what you want inside a handlebars template) However, you should watch out for the limitations, I haven't found a way to access "upper scope levels" from within the expression, say you're in a each scope, {{#each}} ... {{xif ' ../name === this.name' }} {{/each}} ... but I am still investigating.. –  bentael Mar 12 at 16:05
    
found a solution for "upper scope access" but using a new helper, see updated answer, {{z ...}} helper –  bentael Mar 13 at 5:44
    
BOOM ! Awesome, now I can do real condition inside my partial thanks ! –  Anc Ainu Apr 3 at 15:58
    
Can you setup an example of zif? I am not sure if my problem is the fact that the parent is an each statement as well, but can't get it working. I get Expecting 'ID', got 'undefined' error. Thanks. –  fanfavorite Jun 4 at 2:14
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There is a simple way of doing this without writing a helper function... It can be done within the template completely.

{{#if cond1}}   
  {{#if con2}}   
    <div> and condition completed</div>  
  {{/if}}
{{else}}   
  <div> both conditions weren't true</div>  
{{/if}}

Edit: Conversely you can do or's by doing this:

{{#if cond1}}  
  <div> or condition completed</div>    
{{else}}   
  {{#if cond2}}  
    <div> or condition completed</div>  
  {{else}}      
    <div> neither of the conditions were true</div>    
  {{/if}}  
{{/if}}

Edit/Note: From the handlebar's website: handlebarsjs.com here are the falsy values:

You can use the if helper to conditionally render a block. If its argument returns false, undefined, null, "" or [] (a "falsy" value), Then any 'cond' (like cond1 or cond2) will not be counted as true.

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1  
Not really, you don't compare two value, you just ensure both of them exists, it's different. –  Cyril N. Sep 2 '13 at 13:43
3  
Actually it evaluates it the same way javascript does, from the website: "You can use the if helper to conditionally render a block. If its argument returns false, undefined, null, "" or [ ] (a "falsy" value), Handlebars will not render the block." –  jQwierdy Sep 4 '13 at 15:40
1  
You are right, I firstly thought the test was to compare two values, not testing of both existed. My bad, sorry. –  Cyril N. Sep 4 '13 at 20:00
    
This doesn't work correctly. If cond1 is true and con2 is false, nothing will be printed. –  Tessa Lau Apr 1 at 22:47
    
Hey @TessaLau, I think I see where you're coming from. However if you draw out a control flow you'll see that in the very first line moves the control flow to that condition. –  jQwierdy Apr 3 at 14:40
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One problem with all of the answers posted here is that they don't work with bound properties, i.e. the if condition is not re-evaluated when the properties involved change. Here's a slightly more advanced version of the helper supporting bindings. It uses the bind function from the Ember source, which is also used to implement the normal Ember #if helper.

This one is limited to a single bound property on the left-hand side, comparing to a constant on the right-hand side, which I think is good enough for most practical purposes. If you need something more advanced than a simple comparison, then perhaps it would be good to start declaring some computed properties and using the normal #if helper instead.

Ember.Handlebars.registerHelper('ifeq', function(a, b, options) {
  return Ember.Handlebars.bind.call(options.contexts[0], a, options, true, function(result) {
    return result === b;
  });
});

You can use it like this:

{{#ifeq obj.some.property "something"}}
  They are equal!
{{/ifeq}}
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Similar to Jim's answer but a using a bit of creativity we could also do something like this:

Handlebars.registerHelper( "compare", function( v1, op, v2, options ) {

  var c = {
    "eq": function( v1, v2 ) {
      return v1 == v2;
    },
    "neq": function( v1, v2 ) {
      return v1 != v2;
    },
    ...
  }

  if( Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call( c, op ) ) {
    return c[ op ].call( this, v1, v2 ) ? options.fn( this ) : options.inverse( this );
  }
  return options.inverse( this );
} );

Then to use it we get something like:

{{#compare numberone "eq" numbretwo}}
  do something
{{else}}
  do something else
{{/compare}}

I would suggest moving the object out of the function for better performance but otherwise you can add any compare function you want, including "and" and "or".

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if you just want to check if one or the other element are present you can use this custom helper

Handlebars.registerHelper('if_or', function(elem1, elem2, options) {
  if (Handlebars.Utils.isEmpty(elem1) && Handlebars.Utils.isEmpty(elem2)) {
    return options.inverse(this);
  } else {
    return options.fn(this);
  }
});

like this

{{#if_or elem1 elem2}}
  {{elem1}} or {{elem2}} are present
{{else}}
  not present
{{/if_or}}

if you also need to be able to have an "or" to compare function return values I would rather add another property that returns the desired result.

The templates should be logicless after all!

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One other alternative is to use function name in #if. The #if will detect if the parameter is function and if it is then it will call it and use its return for truthyness check. Below myFunction gets current context as this.

{{#if myFunction}}
  I'm Happy!
{{/if}}
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So you would need to add a function into the context? Executing code from a context is a security hole, as the source of the code could be unknown. This can be exploited for an XSS attack. –  T Nguyen Dec 4 '13 at 15:58
    
Yes, you need to add function into the context. In a badly designed website, yes, this could be security hole. But in that case, there would be many others. –  ShitalShah Dec 5 '13 at 2:39
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Unfortunately none of these solutions solve the problem of "OR" operator "cond1 || cond2".

  1. Check if first value is true
  2. Use "^" (or) and check if otherwise cond2 is true

    {{#if cond1}} DO THE ACTION {{^}} {{#if cond2}} DO THE ACTION {{/if}} {{/if}}

It breaks DRY rule. So why not use partial to make it less messy

{{#if cond1}}
    {{> subTemplate}}
{{^}}
    {{#if cond2}}
        {{> subTemplate}}
    {{/if}}
{{/if}}
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I can understand why you would want to create a helper for situations where you have a large number of varied comparisons to perform within your template, but for a relatively small number of comparisons (or even one, which was what brought me to this page in the first place), it would probably just be easier to define a new handlebars variable in your view-rendering function call, like:

Pass to handlebars on render:

var context= {
    'section1' : section1,
    'section2' : section2,
    'section1or2' : (section1)||(section2)
};

and then within your handlebars template:

{{#if section1or2}}
    .. content
{{/if}}

I mention this for simplicity's sake, and also because it's an answer that may be quick and helpful while still complying with the logicless nature of Handlebars.

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I have found a npm package made with CoffeeScript that has a lot of incredible useful helpers for Handlebars. Take a look of the documentation in the following URL:

https://npmjs.org/package/handlebars-helpers

You can do a wget http://registry.npmjs.org/handlebars-helpers/-/handlebars-helpers-0.2.6.tgz to download them and see the contents of the package.

You will be abled to do things like {{#is number 5}} or {{formatDate date "%m/%d/%Y"}}

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Here's a link to the block helper I use: comparison block helper. It supports all the standard operators and lets you write code as shown below. It's really quite handy.

{{#compare Database.Tables.Count ">" 5}}
There are more than 5 tables
{{/compare}}
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For those having problems comparing object properties, inside the helper add this solution

Ember.js helper not properly recognizing a parameter

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Following these 2 guides a-way-to-let-users-define-custom-made-bound-if-statements and custom bound helpers I was able to adjust my shared views in this post on stackoverflow to use this instead of the standard #if statement. This should be more secure than just tossing an #if in there.

The custom bound helpers in that gist are outstanding.

<li>
    <a href="{{unbound view.varProductSocialBlog}}">
        {{#if-equal view.showDiv "true"}}<div>{{/if-equal}}<i class="fa fa-rss-square"></i>{{#if-equal view.showDiv "true"}}</div>{{/if-equal}}
        {{#if-equal view.showTitle "true"}}Blog{{/if-equal}}
    </a>
</li>

I am using the ember cli project to build my ember application.

Current setup at the time of this post:

DEBUG: -------------------------------
DEBUG: Ember      : 1.5.1
DEBUG: Ember Data : 1.0.0-beta.7+canary.b45e23ba
DEBUG: Handlebars : 1.3.0
DEBUG: jQuery     : 2.1.1
DEBUG: -------------------------------
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