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So I have this class:

class A{
      public function do_a(){ return 'a_done';};

      public function do_b(){ return 'b_done';};
}

So I require the php file and create an instance of the class:

require_once("A_class.php");
$System = new A();
require_once("user_calls.php"); //here I import the user file with the function calls.

user_calls.php contents:

echo 'this was the result of '.$System->do_a();
echo 'this was the result of '.$System->do_b();

So, that does work, but I don't want the user to have to use $System->do_a();, but only do_a();.

Any solutions?

EDIT: I also want to limit the functions the user could call in the user_calls.php file, to basic native php functions and those in class A.

share|improve this question
2  
Remove these functions from the class A and put them in the global namespace ? –  Luc M Jan 13 '12 at 16:03
1  
I'm curious why'd you want do to this. Why does it matter if it's $System-> or not? –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 13 '12 at 16:04
1  
if the do_() functions use any resources embedded in the object, you can't - you need the object context for the methods to work. If they don't use embedded resources, you can make them static and do A::do_a() directly. –  Marc B Jan 13 '12 at 16:05
    
You want to be able to use classes, without the classes.... sounds like you simply want to write procedural PHP –  Mark Baker Jan 13 '12 at 16:06
    
@localhost: You could of course write global wrapper functions like function do_a() { global $System; return $System->do_a(); } - but this doesn't seem to make any sense. Is your major approach execute not reliable code within user_calls.php? In that case, I suggest to use a parsed template language like smarty - here you can control the availability of any function and protect and hide your own logic from the code within the template. –  DerVO Jan 13 '12 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

DISCLAIMER: While this code works, and does what you requested, that doesn't mean that I advocate coding like this. It's very hard to follow for other developers (and maybe even you in the future...), and it also makes use of eval(), which is almost always A Bad Thing(tm). That said, here you go:

<?php
class A {
    public function do_a() {
        return __METHOD__;
    }

    public function do_b() {
        return __METHOD__;
    }
}

$aRef = new ReflectionClass('A');
$aPublicMethods = $aRef->getMethods(ReflectionMethod::IS_PUBLIC);

foreach ($aPublicMethods as $method) {
    $php = <<<PHP
function {$method->name}() {
    global \$System;
    return \$System->{$method->name}();
}
PHP;

    eval($php);
}

$System = new A();

echo 'this was the result of ' . do_a();
echo 'this was the result of ' . do_b();

Please also note that if your methods use arguments, things get even more hairy. Also, if you name any of your methods the same as a function in the global namespace (ex. substr()), this will attempt to redefine them, and you'll probably get a Fatal Error.

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If you're using PHP 5.3+, you can get rid of eval by doing ${$method->name} = function(){};, but then they'd have to be called like $do_a(). –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 13 '12 at 17:42
1  
@Rocket: I thought about that, but he said he wanted to be able to call it as do_a(), so I used this method instead. IMO, your method is better if his only intent is to make the calls as short as possible. –  drrcknlsn Jan 13 '12 at 17:47
    
Instead of eval() I could use call_user_func(), right? And what does $php = <<<PHP do, exactly? –  localhost Jan 13 '12 at 18:12
    
@localhost: No, call_user_func() does not evaluate PHP code. $php = <<<PHP is called heredoc syntax; it's a way to delimit strings. Most people use them because they don't need to escape quotes for really long or block-style strings (like PHP code). –  drrcknlsn Jan 13 '12 at 19:29

Methods of a class are either instance methods (they act on a particular instance of a class defined by $this) or they are class methods (They aren't tied to any one particular instance of a class, but provide services that fall within the remit of the class.

An instance method is defined as follows:

public function foo()
{
}

whereas a class method is defined with the STATIC keyword.

static public function bar()
{
}

In the instance method you can use $this to get access to the state of the instance on which the method was called. This is not available in the class method because it's not tied to any one instance. It can access other members of the class (provided they're not tied to an instance) with the self keyword though.

Instance methods are called as follows:

$a = new ObjType ()
$output = $a -> foo ();

Class methods are called as follows:

$output = ObjType::bar ();

No matter which approach you use you either have to provide an instance (for instance methods) or a class (for class methods) to call the method. Calling just foo() or bar() will not work.

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Can't I tell php that every function called in that file is referencing the class A? –  localhost Jan 13 '12 at 16:19
1  
There are hacks that might allow it, like wrapping the method calls in normal function calls. However I'd massively recommend against doing anything like that as all you're going to do is make your code less readable and more unmaintainable. I don't see any benefit to doing it and the drawbacks are seriousl –  GordonM Jan 13 '12 at 16:30

You'll have to use a closure. Note that it's calling directly from the class definition, not the object:

class test {
    function method() {
        echo 'method was called';
    }
}

$method = function(){call_user_func('test::method');};
$method();
$method();
$method();

//output:
//method was calledmethod was calledmethod was called

To call the method from the object, rather than the class, you'll have to pass the object into the closure:

class test {
    var $count = 0;
    function method() {
        $this->count++;
        echo $this->count . "|<br />";
    }
}

$obj = new test;
$obj2 = new test;
$method = function($object){call_user_func(array($object, 'method'));};
$method($obj);
$method($obj);
$method($obj);
$method($obj2);
//output:
//1|
//2|
//3|
//1|

But that's not any prettier or simpler, is it?

If you don't want to clutter up your page, just name the object something short:

$pco = new page_controller_object_with_a_long_name_that_is_annoying;
$pco->do_a();
$pco->do_b();
//etc.
share|improve this answer
2  
Did you mean ->do_a instead of ->do_a()? –  FakeRainBrigand Jan 13 '12 at 16:11
    
The class would provide only output generating functions. And Having to put a $System before every call would clutter up the file and be plain uggly. –  localhost Jan 13 '12 at 16:18
    
Sorry, but you can't do this in PHP. codepad.org/hM2Btaug or codepad.org/dga87zQN –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 13 '12 at 16:28
    
Totally right. I did a quick test and it appeared to work, but it was a fluke that what happened was what I expected. Closures do work. But it would not be anywhere near as simple or clear as just using the object the way it was intended. Really do think you're on the wrong track, localhost! –  jeremiahs Jan 13 '12 at 16:39
    
The code above throws an error on codepad, but it works on my webserver. –  jeremiahs Jan 13 '12 at 16:45

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