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How to make async method call inside of another async each method (NodeJS)?

Concrete example - working with a database, I need to delete all records. But I can't just drop the whole collection, I need to destroy every record one by one, before deletion I need to read the record, perform some business logic in the app and only then delete it.

So, let's try to implement our deleteAll method (actually it's a real API from node-mongodb-native driver):

deleteAll = function(selector, callback){
  collection.find(selector).each(function(err, doc){
    if(err){
      callback(err)
    }else{
      if(doc === null){
        // each returns null when there's no more documents, we are finished.
        callback(null)      
      }else{
        doSomeBusinessLogicBeforeDelete(doc)

        // How to delete it using asynchronous `remove` method?        
        collection.remove({_id: doc._id}, function(err){
          // What to do with this callback? 
          // And how to make `each` wait untill we 
          // deleting this record?
          ???
        })
      }      
    }
  })
}

There's actually a way to do it - using the collection.nextObject method instead of collection.each, but I want to know is this possible to solve this using each or not? Right now I believe that it's not possible, but maybe I'm wrong?

UPDATE: the source of each method:

Cursor.prototype.each = function(callback) {
  var self = this;

  if (!callback) {
    throw new Error('callback is mandatory');
  }

  if(this.state != Cursor.CLOSED) {
    process.nextTick(function(){
      // Fetch the next object until there is no more objects
      self.nextObject(function(err, item) {        
        if(err != null) return callback(err, null);

        if(item != null) {
          callback(null, item);
          self.each(callback);
        } else {
          // Close the cursor if done
          self.state = Cursor.CLOSED;
          callback(err, null);
        }

        item = null;
      });
    });
  } else {
    callback(new Error("Cursor is closed"), null);
  }
};
share|improve this question
    
Do you have the source code for the each method? It should be quite easy to find you if you have that. – hugomg Jan 13 '12 at 16:54

Well what you wrote will work, although not sure about this line:

  if(doc === null){
    // each returns null when there's no more documents, we are finished.
    callback(null)  

Since, I don't know the logic, but that will work. Technically the functions don't wait, you just pass another function, which will be executed when the work finished. what is being done is async and parallel here. You can also have a look at the async version of each and some other functions in async module.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, yes it sort of works, but the collection.remove will be executed in parallel instead of serially, and the final callback may fire even before some of the `collection.remove' will be finished. – Alexey Petrushin Jan 13 '12 at 17:23

Try something like this.

deleteAll = function(selector, callback){
  // count all documents you need to fire remove for
  var count = collection.filter(function(doc) { return doc === null }).length,
          i = count;

  collection.find(selector).each(function(err, doc){
    if(err){
      callback(err)
    }else{
      if(doc === null){
        callback(null)      
      }else{
        doSomeBusinessLogicBeforeDelete(doc)

        collection.remove({_id: doc._id}, function(err){
          i--;
          if (i <= 0) callback('done');
        })
      }      
    }
  })
}
share|improve this answer

So, after a couple of months with node, I got answer for my question, here's one possible implementation of async each (there may be other similar but with minor differences in error handling):

asyncEach(
  function(obj, next){
    // do something with obj
    // call next when You finish and want next object, 
    // You can also pass error into next in case of error.
    console.log(obj)
    next()
  },
  function(err){
    // Will be called when there's no more objects.
  }
)

Implementation of each in mongo is different, it's impossible with it to do proper sequential iteration (maybe it's ok, maybe they have different design goals in mind).

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