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I'm maintaining some C# 2.0 code, and the programmer uses a pattern of reading a collection of business objects by opening a DataReader and then passing it to the object's constructor. I can't see anything obviously wrong with this, but it feels bad to me. Is this OK to do?

private static void GetObjects()
{
    List<MyObject> objects = new List<MyObject>();
    string sql = "Select ...";
    SqlConnection connection = GetConnection();
    SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection);
    connection.Open();
    SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
    while (reader.Read())
        objects.Add(new MyObject(reader));
    reader.Close();
}

public MyObject(SqlDataReader reader)
{
    field0 = reader.GetString(0);
    field1 = reader.GetString(1);
    field2 = reader.GetString(2);
}
share|improve this question
    
My example wasn't clear, but assume MyObject is a separate class. – Sisiutl May 19 '09 at 22:59
    
You can change your code to make it a class... :) – Colin Burnett May 19 '09 at 23:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

By passing the DataReader to the object's constructor, you establish a very tight coupling between the business object and your choice of persistence technology.

At the very least, this tight coupling will make reuse and testing difficult; at worst, it could result in the business objects knowing far too much about the database.

Resolving this isn't too difficult - you'd simply move object initialization out of the constructor and into a distinct factory class.

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3  
I think changing SqlDataReader to IDataReader in the methods constructor goes a long way toward fixing this too. IDataReader is generic enough not to be tied to any underlying persistence technology. – TheSoftwareJedi May 19 '09 at 23:01
    
I don't completely agree - while you gain some decoupling, since you're no longer reliant on a specific implementation, passing IDataReader is still tying you to using raw ADO.NET, living as it does in the System.Data namespace, precluding the use of anything that provides a higher abstraction (NHibernate, Entity Framework, Lightspeed, Genome, etc etc). – Bevan May 20 '09 at 3:38
    
IDataReader is quite complex - you're winning almost nothing by using it instead of SqlDataReader. The only alternative you have with IDataReader is portability to a different ADO.NET provider, which is a bridge you might as well pass when you reach it - that particular interface will be the least of your troubles. – Eamon Nerbonne Sep 16 '09 at 20:59

Passing a reader around makes me cringe, unless it's a non-public helper method to deal with copying one row. Definitely not to a constructor though.

Passing a reader connects your constructor (you didn't put MyObject in a class but you call new MyObject()) to your data storage and I presume your object isn't written to be such?

If it were me:

private static void GetObjects()
{
    List<MyObject> objects = new List<MyObject>();
    string sql = "Select ...";
    using (SqlConnection connection = GetConnection())
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection);
        connection.Open();
        using(SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);)
        {
            while (reader.Read())
                objects.Add(_ReadRow(reader));
        }
    }
}

private static MyObject _ReadRow(SqlDataReader reader)
{
    MyObject o = new MyObject();
    o.field0 = reader.GetString(0);
    o.field1 = reader.GetString(1);
    o.field2 = reader.GetString(2);

    // Do other manipulation to object before returning

    return o;
}

class MyObject{}
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this is almost definately what I would do - I am sure someone will show a way to use anonymous methods or lambdas. I am curious to see how "popular" this solution becomes. – MikeJ May 19 '09 at 23:16
    
"using(SqlDataReader reader..." isn't really needed, right? Since the connection is already wrapped up, the dispose on that will clean up the commands, cursors, etc. – TheSoftwareJedi May 20 '09 at 0:03
2  
If the class implements IDisposable, then it wants you to call Dispose. Don't disappoint it. – John Saunders May 20 '09 at 1:23
    
This solution breaks the encapsulation of MyObject, however. This is bad, because you're really changing meaningful guarantees here: field0 etc. must suddenly be non-private, and even if your helper is a member of the class, they can't (for instance) be readonly. I'd prefer the original code's approach to this approach - which is still quite tightly coupled to SqlDataReader, and harder to read and reason about to boot. – Eamon Nerbonne Sep 16 '09 at 21:03
    
Eamon, having private fields on an object who's purpose is to covert data into an object seems rather counterproductive. The object exists to store your data and to hide the SQL layer, so it's storing your data the way you want it to. I cannot fathom a reasonable situation in which this layer should hide data from you. In other words, this layer exists to hide the persistence not hide your data. (FWIW, you could pass these fields into the constructor instead or use reflection.) – Colin Burnett Sep 17 '09 at 12:44

I would not do it this way, but I do not see anything majorly wrong.

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I'd make entity passed in an IDataReader as this aids testing of the MyObject.

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Out of curiosity, have you tried doing that? I started down that path, and while it looked possible IDataReader is a very large interface with nasty bits like GetSchemaTable. Your testing code will be large, complex, and difficult to maintain. And most of the code you'll be testing will be tightly tied to actual sql databases - and almost all bugs will be in that coupling (transactions, query issues, timing etc.). I decided it wasn't worth it anyhow. – Eamon Nerbonne Sep 16 '09 at 21:14
    
Good comment. No I haven't. – Preet Sangha Sep 16 '09 at 23:51

I'd call this a "leaky abstraction".

I like to use persistence objects in the narrowest scope possible: acquire them, use them, clean them up. If there was a well-defined persistence object, you could ask it to map the query result into an object or collection, close the reader within method scope, and return the object or collection to your client.

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(EDIT: This answer focuses solely on the "what are the implications at a relatively low level" rather than the overall design implications. It looks like other answers have got those covered, so I won't comment :)

Well, there's definitely something wrong with the code you've given, as nothing closes the connection, command or reader. Specifically, your connection assignment line should usually look like this:

using (SqlConnection connection = GetConnection())
{
    ...
}

You may well think this is just nit-picking, and that it's just sample code and the clean-up is unimportant - but the "ownership" of resources which need cleaning up is precisely the issue with passing a DataReader to a constructor.

I think it's okay as long as you document who "owns" the reader afterwards. For instance, in Image.FromStream, the image owns the stream afterwards and may not take kindly to you closing it yourself (depending on the image format and a few other things). Other times it's still your responsibility to close. This must be very carefully documented, and if the type with the constructor takes ownership, it should implement IDisposable to make the clean-up easier and to make it more obvious that cleanup is required.

In your case, it looks like the constructor is not taking ownership of the reader, which is a perfectly fine (and simpler) alternative. Simply document that, and the caller will still have to close the reader appropriately.

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1  
+1 for CLOSE THE CONNECTION. Use a 'using' clause! – TheSoftwareJedi May 19 '09 at 23:03
    
Objections to the edit? did I add too much? :) – TheSoftwareJedi May 19 '09 at 23:05
    
Fine by me - I've added a "usually" as there are some rare cases where it ends up working slightly differently, but normally a using statement is the way to go. – Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 5:22

I totally agree with duffymo (+1) (and Bevan)

An idea I have been chewing over in my mind recently is, if I do have to have a dependency , and of course when I map a reader to an object I have to have a dependency, maybe I should make it completely explicit and in fact write an extension method to achieve it, something like...

//This Static extension class in the same namespace (but not necesarrily assembly) as my BO

public static class DataReaderExtensions
{
  public static List<MyObject> GetMyObjects(this DataReader reader)
  {

  }
}

this way, as long as I am in the reference scope of my business object, my datareader will now have a method tailored to my needs...the idea probably needs to be fleshed out more, but I think this would be elegant.

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To separate business and data layers use YIELD

  public IEnumerable<IDataReader> getIDataReader(string sql)
{

    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("cadena de conexion"))
    {
        using (SqlCommand da = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
        {
            conn.Open();
            using (SqlDataReader dr = da.ExecuteReader)
            {
                if (dr.HasRows)
                {
                    while (dr.Read)
                    {
                        yield return dr;
                    }
                }
            }
            conn.Close();
        }
    }
}
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Passing the data reader to the constructor may be debatable, but - as far as I know - is a well-known approach. But whoever uses it, should pass an abstraction, i.e. not SqlDataReader but IDataReader. Yet IDataReader is not optimal; it should be IDataRecord instead, which comprises the result for the respective record, instead of allowing to iterate!!

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