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I am having a problem with a program I wrote in c++ on window 7 using C::B. Here is the code that I have been using to check the number of lines in a file. The first part is the declaration of the gotoline function, followed by the part of the code where I count the number of lines in a file. Everything worked fine until I started adding a logging process. Maybe I am logging information wrong or working with opening and closing too many files inside a single function? Any help identifying my error would be greatly appreciated, and I would be glad to give any more detail or clarification about my issue, just ask. I am still learning c++ so I am just very confused why my program stopped counting the lines.

std::ifstream& GotoLine(std::ifstream& file, unsigned int num)
{
file.seekg(std::ios::beg);
for(int i=0; i < num - 1; ++i)
{
    file.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(),'\n');
}
return file;
}


ifstream productguide;

   productguide.open ("MasterProductGuide.csv");

   if (productguide.good())
   {

        c = productguide.get();
        if (c=='\n')x++;

        ofstream log;
        log.open ("log.txt", ofstream::app);

        if (log.good())
        {
            time_t rawtime;
            struct tm * timeinfo;
            time ( &rawtime );
            timeinfo = localtime ( &rawtime );
            string loginfo;
            loginfo = asctime (timeinfo);
            log << "MarketManager Detected " << x << " # of lines in the Master Product Guide - " + loginfo;
        }
        else
        {
            cout << "There was an error creating the log file" << endl;
            cout << "The Program will now terminate" << endl;
            system("PAUSE");
            return 0;
        }
        log.close();

   }
   else
   {
        ofstream log;
        log.open ("log.txt", ofstream::app);

        if (log.good())
        {
            time_t rawtime;
            struct tm * timeinfo;
            time ( &rawtime );
            timeinfo = localtime ( &rawtime );
            string loginfo;
            loginfo = asctime (timeinfo);
            log << "MarketManager Failed to oped the Master Product Guide - " + loginfo;
        }
        else
        {
            cout << "There was an error creating the log file" << endl;
            cout << "The Program will now terminate" << endl;
            system("PAUSE");
            return 0;
        }
        log.close();

        cout << "The Program will now terminate" << endl;
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
   }

   productguide.close();
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I understand nothing. Can you post full version of this source file? –  Alexandr Priymak Jan 13 '12 at 17:24
    
Its almost 1000 lines because of the way i break things up for readability. Is there a better way of sending it without posting. –  Rob Jan 13 '12 at 17:27
2  
This TWO pieces of code look OK for me. So I think the problem is in another place –  Alexandr Priymak Jan 13 '12 at 17:30
    
We need to see the actual code. For example, there is no way of telling how you are counting lines in the sample you posted. If your code is too long then reduce it to the smallest size you can that duplicates the issue. Chances are that by doing this you'll find the issue anyways. –  uesp Jan 13 '12 at 18:04
    
@Rob, for very large code samples you can use a site like Pastebin. –  Andrew Lambert Jan 13 '12 at 18:48

1 Answer 1

Looking at this code I see your log just keeps getting opened with append. So eventually it will get pretty big.

I can't say that there is not another reason that this code will fail, but a file larger than 2gb certainly could do the trick. I don't recall if append mode has problems with this, but internally it may use seek. Seek definitely has problems with large files. On linux you would use the fseek64 family of functions. Windows has its own versions with underscore warts for the sake of incompatibility.

When you are working with streams you should check its error flags as well, it won't actually throw when things go wrong. You check after open, but other operations can fail as well.

More specifically, the call to std::istream::ignore. Your GotoLine doesn't check for eof. From a design perspective, I would be pretty suspicious of that. It may work, but it certainly shouldn't pass a code review.

As a nitpick, errors should be printed to std::cerr and return 1. :)

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