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Does anyone have a modern CSS method for doing something like this? I've been searching for ages. Maybe I'm using the wrong search terms?

http://fu2k.org/alex/css/equalheight/divs/clipped

UPDATE:

Thanks to all for the replies & comments. Unfortunately the background of my div is patterned and has a thin solid border so this seems to rule out a lot of suggestions. I'm still exploring the ideas. Perhaps a javascript approach is a possibility?

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IE does not support this - at all –  Johnny Craig Jan 13 '12 at 17:12
    
Check out css3pie.com –  Loktar Jan 13 '12 at 17:13
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can achieve this with pure CSS - cross-platform, working down to IE7 (I haven't tested this with IE6, but I think it should still work).

<style type="text/css">
<!--
div.big {
    position: relative;
    width: 600px;
    height: 200px;
    background:#FFF url(images/pattern.png)
    border: solid 1px black;
}

div.top-left-b {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    border-top: solid 40px black;
    border-right: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 1;
}

div.top-left-w {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: -1px;
    left: -1px;
    border-top: solid 40px white;
    border-right: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 2;
}

div.top-right-b {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    border-top: solid 40px black;
    border-left: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 1;
}

div.top-right-w {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: -1px;
    right: -1px;
    border-top: solid 40px white;
    border-left: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 2;
}

div.bottom-left-b {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    border-bottom: solid 40px black;
    border-right: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 1;
}

div.bottom-left-w {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -1px;
    left: -1px;
    border-bottom: solid 40px white;
    border-right: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 2;
}

div.bottom-right-b {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    border-bottom: solid 40px black;
    border-left: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 1;
}

div.bottom-right-w {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -1px;
    right: -1px;
    border-bottom: solid 40px white;
    border-left: solid 40px transparent;
    z-index: 2;
}
-->
</style>

<div class="big">
    <div class="top-left-b"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="top-left-w"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="top-right-b"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="top-right-w"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="bottom-left-b"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="bottom-left-w"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="bottom-right-b"><!-- --></div>
    <div class="bottom-right-w"><!-- --></div>
</div>

This would produce the following effect:

enter image description here

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This is cool but I guess the box can't have a background image? –  cronoklee Jan 13 '12 at 18:14
    
Well, that depends. You can have background image set to the box - and it would still work. Notice the `transparent' color on each of the corners' css - that would just show what's underneath, being that an image or a solid colour. –  Aleks G Jan 13 '12 at 18:21
    
Cool yes - tried it and this is a pretty good solution! The only problem for me is that it doesnt allow a 1px border around the shape. I may have to look at some hacky alternatives i think. –  cronoklee Jan 13 '12 at 18:29
    
You could immitate 1px black border with a bit more hackery at css - just lay out 2 boxes over each other shifted by 1 px. I'll try hacking this - and post results. –  Aleks G Jan 13 '12 at 18:33
    
I have updated my answer to create white box with clipped corners and 1px black border. –  Aleks G Jan 13 '12 at 18:43
show 1 more comment

For rounded corners, you can use the border-radius (with and without vendor-prefixes).

If you really want the same look as in the image at the question, you can use two containers, and applying CSS-transform (with and without vendor-prefixes) + overflow:hidden to get the desired look.

A fallback has to be used for older browsers which do not support these methods, by using a transparent background image.

Demo + further explanation of logic at: http://jsfiddle.net/7upkc/1/

HTML:

<div class="outer-clipped-box">
    <div class="inner-clipped-box">
        <div class="content-clipped-box">
            Content here.
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS (vendor-specific prefixed for crossbrowser support, ignored Opera and IE in this case):

.outer-clipped-box {
    height: 200px;
    width: 200px;
    overflow: hidden;
}
.inner-clipped-box {
    height: 250px;
    width: 250px;
    background: #ddf;

    -moz-transform-origin: 140px 84px;
    -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -webkit-transform-origin: 140px 84px;
    -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
    transform-origin: 140px 84px;
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}

/* Undo rotation, to get the content in the right position*/
.content-clipped-box {
    height: 150px;
    width: 150px;

    -moz-transform-origin: center center;
    -moz-transform: rotate(-45deg) translate(0,70px);
    -webkit-transform-origin: center center;
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg) translate(0,70px);
    transform-origin: center center;
    transform: rotate(-45deg) translate(0,70px);
}
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Cool sounds promising - looking forward to the demo! I dont need much backward support since its just a style feature but I'd love it to work in modern webkit, IE & geko –  cronoklee Jan 13 '12 at 17:25
    
@cronoklee Have a look at the updated answer. May look big, but many lines are just duplicates to enable support across multiple browsers. –  Rob W Jan 13 '12 at 17:40
    
Cool thanks for this Rob. Does this method allow a background image on the shape? –  cronoklee Jan 13 '12 at 18:32
    
Updated demo, which allows background-images: jsfiddle.net/7upkc/2 –  Rob W Jan 13 '12 at 18:45
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There is no modern css for this, only for rounded corners. But you can draw clipped edges with old-school borders. Look at this example http://ago.tanfa.co.uk/css/borders/stacked-cubes.html

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It can be done. Google for "CSS diagonal corner" or triangle but the only example I recall reading used tricks. Here's an example of a triangle that you might use to insert into a corner and set opacity or some such. But this might have better info on that.

EDIT: Even better than all that is the one I should have referred to in the first place: Stu Nichol's site.

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