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Below is the method I have. It works fine for comparing Strings. I would like to make it capable of also comparing Dates or possibly any class that has an acceptably defined compareTo method. Looking for an easy way to do this. I was heading down a hacky path. Also open to any other suggestions to improve this method.

protected <E> int compareFields(E o1, E o2,String fieldName){
    String o1Data;
    String o2Data;
    try { 
        o1Data = (String) o1.getClass().getMethod(fieldName).invoke(o1);
        o2Data = (String) o2.getClass().getMethod(fieldName).invoke(o2);
    }
    catch(Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
    if(o1Data == null && o2Data == null){
        return 0;
    } else if (o1Data == null){
        return 1;
    } else if (o2Data == null){
        return -1;
    }
    return o2Data.compareTo(o1Data);
}
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Do what ever, but before doing anything do see, that what ever is being returned from your if else clause is exactly the same value which will be returned from the compareTo() function. So broadly speaking, this might can give unexpected result. Do keep an eye on that thingy too. Regards –  nIcE cOw Jan 13 '12 at 17:28
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you mean like the following?

protected <E> int compareFields(E o1, E o2, String fieldName){
    try { 
        Comparable o1Data = (Comparable) o1.getClass().getMethod(fieldName).invoke(o1);
        Comparable o2Data = (Comparable) o2.getClass().getMethod(fieldName).invoke(o2);
        return o1Data == null ? o2Data == null ? 0 : 1 :
               o2Data == null ? -1 : o1Data.compareTo(o2Data);
    } catch(Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}

I assume you don't want to reverse sort your data.

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Why not using Comparable<T>, which is meant exactly for this purpose ?

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Why not just write a ComparableComparator:

public class ComparableComparator implements Comparator<Comparable> {

    public int compare( Comparable c1, Comparable c2 ) {
        if( c1 == null && c2 != null ) {
            return 1;
        } else if( c1 != null && c2 == null ) {
            return -1;
        } else if( c1 == null && c2 == null ) {
            return 0;
        } else {
            return c1.compare( c2 );
        }
    }
}
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Using the Comparable class would probably be a better solution, but you should also do a test before you trying casting to a String instead of relying on the try-catch for logic flow.

if (o1 instanceof String && o2 instanceof String){}

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Please don't use reflection for things like this!!

Either supply the method with a suitable Comparator, or a method to extract the relevant property (may be computed in a way not supported by the original type), or both.

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Hawtin Sounds like a good idea. This is the first time I've used reflection. So can you tell me what's wrong with using reflection in this case? –  Dale Jan 16 '12 at 15:33
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