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Given the following code,

How would you refactor this so that the method search_word has access to issueid?

I would say that changing the function search_word so it accepts 3 arguments or making issueid an instance variable (@issueid) could be considered as an example of bad practices, but honestly I cannot find any other solution. If there's no solution aside from this, would you mind explaining the reason why there's no other solution?

Please bear in mind that it is a Ruby on Rails model.

def search_type_of_relation_in_text(issueid, type_of_causality)
    relation_ocurrences = Array.new
    keywords_list = { 
        :C => ['cause', 'causes'],
        :I => ['prevent', 'inhibitors'],
        :P => ['type','supersets'],
        :E => ['effect', 'effects'],
        :R => ['reduce', 'inhibited'],
        :S => ['example', 'subsets'] 
    }[type_of_causality.to_sym]  

    for keyword in keywords_list
        relation_ocurrences + search_word(keyword, relation_type)
    end        

    return relation_ocurrences
end


def search_word(keyword, relation_type)
relation_ocurrences = Array.new

@buffer.search('//p[text()*= "'+keyword+'"]/a').each { |relation|

    relation_suggestion_url   = 'http://en.wikipedia.org'+relation.attributes['href']
    relation_suggestion_title = URI.unescape(relation.attributes['href'].gsub("_" , " ").gsub(/[\w\W]*\/wiki\//, ""))

    if not @current_suggested[relation_type].include?(relation_suggestion_url)
        if @accepted[relation_type].include?(relation_suggestion_url)
            relation_ocurrences << {:title => relation_suggestion_title, :wiki_url => relation_suggestion_url, :causality => type_of_causality, :status => "A", :issue_id => issueid}
        else
            relation_ocurrences << {:title => relation_suggestion_title, :wiki_url => relation_suggestion_url, :causality => type_of_causality, :status => "N", :issue_id => issueid}
        end

    end
} 

end
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need additional context, pass it through as an additional argument. That's how it's supposed to work.

Setting @-type instance variables to pass context is bad form as you've identified.

There's a number of Ruby conventions you seem to be unaware of:

  • Instead of Array.new just use [ ], and instead of Hash.new use { }.
  • Use a case statement or a constant instead of defining a Hash and then retrieving only one of the elements, discarding the remainder.
  • Avoid using return unless strictly necessary, as the last operation is always returned by default.
  • Use array.each do |item| instead of for item in array
  • Use do ... end instead of { ... } for multi-line blocks, where the curly brace version is generally reserved for one-liners. Avoids confusion with hash declarations.
  • Try and avoid duplicating large chunks of code when the differences are minor. For instance, declare a temporary variable, conditionally manipulate it, then store it instead of defining multiple independent variables.

With that in mind, here's a reworking of it:

KEYWORDS = { 
    :C => ['cause', 'causes'],
    :I => ['prevent', 'inhibitors'],
    :P => ['type','supersets'],
    :E => ['effect', 'effects'],
    :R => ['reduce', 'inhibited'],
    :S => ['example', 'subsets'] 
}

def search_type_of_relation_in_text(issue_id, type_of_causality)
  KEYWORDS[type_of_causality.to_sym].collect do |keyword|
    search_word(keyword, relation_type, issue_id)
  end
end

def search_word(keyword, relation_type, issue_id)
  relation_occurrences = [ ]

  @buffer.search(%Q{//p[text()*= "#{keyword}'"]/a}).each do |relation|
    relation_suggestion_url = "http://en.wikipedia.org#{relation.attributes['href']}"
    relation_suggestion_title = URI.unescape(relation.attributes['href'].gsub("_" , " ").gsub(/[\w\W]*\/wiki\//, ""))

    if (!@current_suggested[relation_type].include?(relation_suggestion_url))
      occurrence = {
        :title => relation_suggestion_title,
        :wiki_url => relation_suggestion_url,
        :causality => type_of_causality,
        :issue_id => issue_id
      }

      occurrence[:status] =
        if (@accepted[relation_type].include?(relation_suggestion_url))
          'A'
        else
          'N'
        end

      relation_ocurrences << occurrence
    end
  end 

  relation_occurrences
end
share|improve this answer
    
Honestly I read in books like Clean code or even the kernel style guide that 3 argument functions are something to avoid, still, kudos to you for the great tips I was unaware of :) You rock! –  eLobato Jan 13 '12 at 18:33
1  
There's no hard and fast rules for how many arguments are acceptable other than you shouldn't have "too many", whatever that means. Three is reasonable. Sometimes five is okay so long as the alternative is even less appealing. Fifteen, though, fifteen is always a bad idea. At that point use a Hash to transport your arguments. –  tadman Jan 13 '12 at 20:35

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