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I apologize for my novice status, but please bear with me:

I am attempting to create a "flowing text" effect not unlike that seen in older command lines (DOS!) or even nostalgically/humorously reproduced in the "Fallout" line of games developed by Bethesda Game Studios. I am seeking essentially to build a script that would produce this effect on most console applications I would use, from simple LINQ to SQL user applications to console application "games". This is for my own edification, as I am fascinated by the effect and would very much like to reproduce it.

I have considered if it would be possible just to buffer the text with a timer to provide this appearance and give the impression of loading (flowing) text, but as a novice in C#, I am uncertain of where to get started, here. Please let me know if I need to provide any clarification, as I am seeking firmer grounds.

share|improve this question
1  
What does flowing text look like? – Ryan O'Hara Jan 13 '12 at 17:48
    
A simple text message, such as 'Welcome to the Application. Please select from the following database functions.' The effect would continue when users answer and when responses from the application are provided. – JackOrangeLantern Jan 18 '12 at 19:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If by "flowing text", you mean writing text to the Console so that it looks as if somebody is typing it, you'll need to do the following:

  • Trap keyboard input and disable keyboard echo
  • Write each character individually
  • Pause between each character for a suitably brief period of time using Thread.Sleep() before writing the next character.

IF, OTOH, by "flowing text", you mean something akin to the film The Matrix, where characters appear to be falling down from the top of the screen:

Matrix-style animated gif

It's more complicated, especially since the .Net console access is somewhat limited, lacking anything like ncurses.

This question, Is there any console "graphics" library for .Net?, might be helpful there.

FWIW, here's a way of doing this is .Net. You might want to fiddle with the different intervals sizes to get the effect you desire. This doesn't actually hook keystrokes: rather, prior to any display, it consumes any pending keystrokes without echoing them to the shell.

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace FlowingText
{
  class Program
  {
    const int CHARACTER_INTERVAL_IN_MILLISECONDS = 50  ; // interval between characters is 1/4 second (250ms)
    const int PARAGRAPH_INTERVAL_IN_MILLISECONDS = 500 ; // interval between paragraphs is 1 second (1000ms)

    static int Main( string[] args )
    {
      foreach ( string paragraph in PARAGRAPHS )
      {
        Display( paragraph ) ;
      }
      return 0 ;
    }

    public static void Display( string paragraph )
    {
      EndOfLine() ;
      foreach( char ch in paragraph )
      {
        Thread.Sleep( CHARACTER_INTERVAL_IN_MILLISECONDS ) ;
        DisplayChar( ch ) ;
      }
      EndOfLine() ;
      Thread.Sleep( PARAGRAPH_INTERVAL_IN_MILLISECONDS ) ;
      return ;
    }

    private static void DisplayChar( char ch )
    {
      ConsumeInput() ;
      Console.Out.Write( ch ) ;
      Console.Out.Flush() ;
      return ;
    }

    private static void EndOfLine()
    {
      ConsumeInput() ;
      Console.Out.WriteLine() ;
      Console.Out.Flush() ;
      return ;
    }

    private static void ConsumeInput()
    {
      const bool NO_ECHO = true ;

      // consume any pending keystrokes w/o echoing the character
      while( Console.KeyAvailable )
      {
        Console.ReadKey( NO_ECHO ) ;
      }

      return ;
    }

    private static readonly string[] PARAGRAPHS =
    {
      "Nam non rhoncus sapien. Donec in lorem sed mauris porttitor imperdiet vitae ut nunc. In eu erat non nunc dictum vestibulum. Cras erat dui, fringilla vel pulvinar nec, consequat eu orci. Aliquam erat volutpat. Phasellus rhoncus, lectus a volutpat lacinia, quam turpis venenatis sem, a vestibulum orci nulla congue lacus. Quisque molestie, tellus eu dapibus dictum, erat turpis fringilla nibh, id posuere lacus lectus ut libero." ,
      "Mauris vulputate, nulla porttitor dignissim convallis, ligula odio fermentum leo, et faucibus magna eros nec libero. Nam a risus quis mauris ultricies tempor. Quisque nulla velit, pellentesque at pellentesque ac, dignissim quis metus. Fusce tristique, diam vitae pellentesque tristique, metus risus egestas sapien, at luctus justo arcu a neque. Suspendisse enim augue, laoreet in posuere sit amet, facilisis non tortor. Phasellus quam nisl, ullamcorper non volutpat a, pretium vestibulum metus. Suspendisse at faucibus felis. Ut ullamcorper consectetur velit vitae tincidunt." ,
      "Aenean eget purus a nulla varius volutpat. Duis eget blandit massa. Nunc eget arcu ante, sed congue elit. Phasellus vulputate felis non nibh semper non luctus magna eleifend. Maecenas eget nulla nulla, lobortis tincidunt magna. Proin et lacus est, quis viverra elit. Praesent feugiat dui ut tortor bibendum cursus." ,
      .
      . [elided]
      .
      "Vestibulum enim tellus, suscipit vel vulputate nec, dignissim quis dui. Proin porttitor, orci sed vulputate viverra, nisi sem mollis nisi, ut accumsan quam mauris varius lectus. Vivamus ac nunc ipsum, quis vestibulum nisi. Sed aliquet iaculis leo quis commodo. Sed lorem nisi, tincidunt adipiscing blandit at, porta a metus. Vivamus nec leo eget sapien dapibus consequat vel at lacus. Praesent nec ligula felis, eu malesuada nisi. Vestibulum tincidunt nisl quis nulla suscipit volutpat. Sed at ligula sit amet mauris tincidunt dignissim vel in nibh. Vivamus eget hendrerit erat. Sed fringilla congue lacus vitae convallis. Fusce eget risus sit amet lectus placerat commodo. In ac leo sit amet diam sagittis placerat in ultrices eros. Nam semper, orci et malesuada cursus, mi ipsum gravida dolor, at accumsan est magna sit amet ante. Nulla facilisi." ,
      "Aliquam accumsan dictum luctus. Nunc commodo interdum diam, at feugiat augue semper at. Integer tincidunt, metus quis porta cursus, dolor nisl tincidunt massa, nec rhoncus ipsum ligula sit amet nunc. Fusce velit nunc, bibendum et vestibulum nec, consequat non turpis. Aenean gravida sagittis nulla, ut posuere nulla molestie in. Ut nec odio non arcu pellentesque dapibus. Nullam vel ligula sit amet orci tincidunt congue eu a risus." ,
      "Quisque tempus ipsum ut diam scelerisque egestas. Nam at felis nunc. Proin ut odio lacinia massa sagittis tempus quis et metus. Integer dictum eros vel mi tincidunt eu iaculis augue sollicitudin. Integer vel justo ut mi viverra egestas. Aenean consectetur nisl vel dui interdum quis tincidunt lacus scelerisque. Cras lacus dolor, suscipit eget blandit et, cursus at nunc. In dictum malesuada blandit." ,        
    } ;

  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, especially for the thread.sleep, I can use current documentation to try that out and post my results here. Please forgive my noobness: on "Trap keyboard input and disable keyboard echo" - can you explain what that entails? – JackOrangeLantern Jan 18 '12 at 19:31
    
Matrix effect in .NET – Ryan O'Hara Jan 18 '12 at 20:22
    
I do not mean a matrix effect, although that link could come in quite handy, actually. Much thanks on that. However, given my novice status, I cannot reproduce the effect - so please examine this youtube video on New Vegas computer hacking to get a visceral on what I mean (just mute to avoid any extraneous sound): youtube.com/watch?v=yOuULqeFYD4&feature=related . That is what I mean by "flowing text" - a display of typing, with flowing words. The display of the junk material looks not too far off from the matrix one, and I think I can try to reproduce that effect (for real stuff). – JackOrangeLantern Jan 19 '12 at 0:30
    
My answer below incorporates the suggestions from above, I have thus marked it as useful, as it definitely gave me the tips I needed. I am not sure how to improve on what I have, however, and welcome any suggestions or tips. – JackOrangeLantern Jan 20 '12 at 7:06
    
Fascinating! It never occurred to me to process the input in that manner. Thanks for the well-done .Net example. I will give it a shot and see what goes on. – JackOrangeLantern Jan 21 '12 at 5:14

Alright,

I followed the link on Thread.Sleep and attempted to create this effect for text-based Console applications in C#. I was not sure if I should edit my question or post it in an answer, since technically I am attempting to answer my own question, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

I am not sure on how deeply I should document programs and/or code, so please let me know if I under/over document anything.

/**
 * A program which is intended to "slowly" print text in green. 
 * A String read by the Console is converted to a char array and printed to the screen.
 * 
 * Information derived from Microsoft
* -----------------------------------
 * Thread.Sleep is used in two ways: through a Timespan variable and through a direct call to the function.
 * Thread.Sleep(int) blocks the thread in milliseconds.
 * Thread.Sleep(Timespan) blocks the thread for a period of time measured in (int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds).
 * Thread.Sleep is overloaded.
 * -----------------------------------
 * End Information
 * Source 1: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d00bd51t.aspx [Thread.Sleep(int)]
 * Source 2: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/274eh01d.aspx [Thread.Sleep(Timespan)]
 * 
 **/

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace PlacidText
{

class Program
{
    static TimeSpan interval1 = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 1);
    static TimeSpan interval2 = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 2);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Console.WriteLine("Welcome to Placid Text, home of slow-typing.");

        while (true)            //loop
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Initializing Menu");
            Thread.Sleep(interval1);
            Console.WriteLine("Please select from the following options");
            Console.WriteLine("\'t\' to select slow-type,");
            Console.WriteLine("Input \'q\' to quit:");

            String screenselect = Console.ReadLine();


            if (string.Compare(screenselect, "t") == 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Slow-Type");
                Slowtype slowtype = new Slowtype();     //new instance of Slow-Type
                slowtype.PrintZeString();
            }
            else if (string.Compare(screenselect, "q") == 0)
            {
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error: Bad input");
            }

        }

        Console.WriteLine("Ending Session");
        Thread.Sleep(interval2);
        Environment.Exit(1);
    }

    public class Slowtype
    {       //This class is used for Slowtype

        private string printy;

        public Slowtype()       //default constructor
        {
            printy = null;
        }

        public Slowtype(string printy)         //constructor
        {
            this.printy = printy;
        }

        public void PrintZeString()
        {

            Console.WriteLine("Please enter a string");

            printy = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("");

            char[] array = printy.ToCharArray();

            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
            {
                char letter = array[i];

                Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Green;

                Console.Write(letter);

                Console.ResetColor();

                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("");
            return;
        }
    }
}

}

The code runs, but I am not sure if it is the optimal format or best way of going about it, but it is an attempt to work off of the advice provided by nicholas-carey.

~ Jack Orange Lantern

share|improve this answer
    
I amended my answer to show some sample code. – Nicholas Carey Jan 20 '12 at 19:23
    
Kewlness! I am going to implement the code and play with it. I really like the extensive encapsulation of the code. Abstractly, I am unsure how the removal of the keystroke echo impacts the program, but with a bit of research and codework, I think I will develop a better grasp. – JackOrangeLantern Jan 21 '12 at 5:21

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