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I'm trying to implement an algorithm to Howellize a matrix, in the way explained on page 5 of this paper (google docs link) (link to the pdf).

Most of it is pretty obvious to me, I think, but I'm not sure about line 16, does >> mean a right shift there? If it does, then how does it even work? Surely it would mean that bits are being chopped off? As far as I know there's no guarantee at that point that the number it is shifting is being shifted by an amount that preserves the information.
And if it doesn't mean a right shift, what does it mean?

If anyone can spare the time, I'd also like to have a test case (I don't trust myself to come up with one, I don't understand it well enough).

I've implemented it like this, is that correct? (I don't have a test case, so how can I find out?)

int j = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 2 * k + 1; i++)
{
    var R = (from row in rows
                where leading_index(row) == i
                orderby rank(row[i]) ascending
                select row).ToList();
    if (R.Count > 0)
    {
        uint[] r = R[0];
        int p = rank(r[i]);    // rank counts the trailing zeroes
        uint u = r[i] >> p;
        invert(r, u); // multiplies each element of r by the 
                      // multiplicative inverse of u
        for (int s = 1; s < R.Count; s++)
        {
            int t = rank(R[s][i]);
            uint v = R[s][i] >> t;
            if (subtract(R[s], r, v << (t - p)) == 0)
                // subtracts (v<<(t-p)) * r from R[s], 
                // removes if all elements are zero
                rows.Remove(R[s]);
        }
        swap(rows, rows.IndexOf(r), j);
        for (int h = 0; h < j - 1; h++)
        {
            uint d = rows[h][i] >> p;
            subtract(rows[h], r, d);
        }
        if (r[i] != 1)
            // shifted returns r left-shifted by 32-p
            rows.Add(shifted(r, 32 - p));
        j++;
    }
}
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I can't speak to whether the algorithm is correct, but that does appear to be a bitshift. Notice, though, that the previous line counts the number of trailing zeros, so the shift is just dropping all trailing zeros from the number. –  templatetypedef Jan 13 '12 at 22:49
    
@templatetypedef I just noticed something, line 16 in my own code happens to have a right shift (obviously, as I put it there, to calculate the odd v for which v << t = R[s][i]) - but I wrote that code. My question is about line 16 in the paper, the previous line there does not appear to calculate the trailing number of zeroes, unless it's exploiting some invariant I don't know about. –  harold Jan 14 '12 at 9:05
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For test case, this may help you (page no #2). Also try this.

I think that you are right about the right shift. To get the Howell form, they want the values other than leading value in a column to be smaller than the leading value. Right shifting seems fruitful for that.

line 16 says:

         Pick d so that 0 <= G(h,i) - d * ri < ri

Consider

         G(h,i) - d * ri = 0
         G(h,i) = d * ri
         G(h,i) = d * (2 ^ p)  ... as the comment on line 8 says, ri = 2^p.
         So d = G(h,i) / (2 ^ p)

Right shifting G(h,i) by p positions is the quickest way to compute the value of d.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that looks useful. Are you sure about the shifting though? I agree it seems fruitful, but to me at least it also seems somewhat destructive. –  harold Jan 15 '12 at 17:27
    
line 16 says: Pick d so that 0 <= G(h,i) - d * ri < ri Consider G(h,i) - d * ri = 0 G(h,i) = d * ri G(h,i) = d * (2 ^ p) .... as comment on line 8 says, ri = 2^p. So, d = G(h,i) / (2 ^ p) Right shifting G(h,i) by p position(s) is the quickest way to compute the value of d. –  Tejas Patil Jan 15 '12 at 17:53
    
<br>line 16 says: Pick d so that 0 <= G(h,i) - d * ri < ri <br/> <br>Consider <br/> <br>G(h,i) - d * ri = 0 <br/> <br>G(h,i) = d * ri <br/> <br>G(h,i) = d * (2 ^ p) ....as line 8 says, ri = 2^p. <br/> <br>So d = G(h,i) / (2 ^ p) <br/> <br>Right shifting G(h,i) by p positions is the quickest way to compute the value of d.<br/> –  Tejas Patil Jan 15 '12 at 17:53
    
Nice thanks, I think I get it now –  harold Jan 15 '12 at 18:25
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