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    int fread(char cc[],int a[],int q)
    {
        ifstream infile;
        infile.open("C:\\Dev-Cpp\\DCS\\Decom\\a.txt",ios::binary);
        infile.read(cc,257);
        infile.close(); 

        for(int i=0;i<256;i++){a[i]=(unsigned char)cc[i];}
        return 0;
    }

Now q gets the value from the thread counter, here is what i want to do,

if q is 0, it reads the first 256 characters and if q is 1, it reads the characters from position 256 to 512 and so on

Is this a correct way to do it, cc and a have an array of size 256, or is there a more efficient way of doing this ?

        int fread(char cc[],int a[],int q)
        {
            int ka=0,kb=0;
            kb=q*256; 
            ka=ka+256;
            ifstream infile;
            infile.open("C:\\Dev-Cpp\\DCS\\Decom\\a.txt",ios::binary);
            infile.seekg(256);
            infile.read(cc,ka);
            infile.close(); 

            for(int i=0;i<256;i++){a[i]=(unsigned char)cc[i];}
            return 0;
        }

I'm getting a Unhandled exception at 0xb9fb2475 in s949.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xb9fb2475 when i debug it in vc++ 2010.

share|improve this question
    
Why are 257 chars read, but only 256 are processed in the for loop? (See first read function). –  Thomas Matthews Jan 13 '12 at 18:30
    
i read somewhere that's the way you do it, 257 reads 256 characters –  Gambit King Jan 13 '12 at 18:44
    
I have always used 256 to read 256 bytes. If the file contains 256 characters, the program won't into unexpected behavior land by reading past the end of file or into the next block of data. –  Thomas Matthews Jan 13 '12 at 18:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your second version of fread is close. Here are some issues I identified.
1. The title is fread. This is a common C and C++ library function. Could present problems down the road, when fread is called (which version would they be using?).
2. When passing arrays, the capacity of the array should be passed also.
3. When passing arrays as source, declare them as const.
4. When passing arrays as the target / destination, pass by reference.
5. Don't use arrays, std::vector is a lot safer.
6. When position the input file, use your value not a constant 256.
7. Include the size of the record when determining positions. If you are reading integers, multiply by sizeof(int).
8. Why read into a local buffer then copy to the client's buffer when you can directly read into the client's buffer?
9. Prefer library routines, such as std::copy, when copying the data.

share|improve this answer
    
"The title is fread"? Doesn't look like it to me. If it ever was, that was only during the ninja edit grace period, some 30 minutes before you answered. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '12 at 19:05
    
Also, some of your suggestions are mutually exclusive. "the capacity of the array should be passed also" and "when passing arrays, pass by reference" are incompatible, as an array reference knows its bound and doesn't need the capacity passed. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '12 at 19:06
    
There is no source buffer. There is no local buffer. There are two result buffers, with different types. Reading directly into the int buffer would dramatically change the behavior (right now each byte ends up in a separate element). The size of the record (sizeof cc[i]) is guaranteed to be one, no need for multiplication. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '12 at 19:07

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