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If I have a list in Python like

[1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1]

How do I calculate the greatest number of repeats for any element? In this case 2 is repeated a maximum of 4 times and 1 is repeated a maximum of 3 times.

Is there a way to do this but also record the index at which the longest run began?

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It sounds you are looking for the longest run in the list; you might want to edit your question to make that clear. –  las3rjock May 19 '09 at 23:43
2  
Specifically the longest run of each number –  Sparr May 19 '09 at 23:43
    
Yes Sparr that is correct. Is there a way to do this but also record the index at which the longest run began? –  hekevintran May 19 '09 at 23:51
    
@hekevintran: You should edit the question -- not add comments -- to clarify your question. –  S.Lott May 20 '09 at 0:53
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7 Answers 7

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Use groupby, it group elements by value:

from itertools import groupby
group = groupby([1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1])
print max(group, key=lambda k: len(list(k[1])))

And here is the code in action:

>>> group = groupby([1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1])
>>> print max(group, key=lambda k: len(list(k[1])))
(2, <itertools._grouper object at 0xb779f1cc>)
>>> group = groupby([1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3])
>>> print max(group, key=lambda k: len(list(k[1])))
(3, <itertools._grouper object at 0xb7df95ec>)

From python documentation:

The operation of groupby() is similar to the uniq filter in Unix. It generates a break or new group every time the value of the key function changes

# [k for k, g in groupby('AAAABBBCCDAABBB')] --> A B C D A B
# [list(g) for k, g in groupby('AAAABBBCCD')] --> AAAA BBB CC D

If you also want the index of the longest run you can do the following:

group = groupby([1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3])
result = []
index = 0
for k, g in group:
   length = len(list(g))
   result.append((k, length, index))
   index += length

print max(result, key=lambda a:a[1])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 — groupby is tailor-made for this. –  Ben Blank May 19 '09 at 23:52
    
Is there a way to do this and also record the index at which the longest run began? Thanks! –  hekevintran May 19 '09 at 23:52
    
I updated the answer with a solution to get the index as well –  Nadia Alramli May 20 '09 at 0:02
    
Doesn't work with empty sequences, but nice solution anyway! –  MartinStettner May 20 '09 at 0:11
    
+1 Great utilization of functional programming tools. –  Adam Matan Sep 7 '09 at 12:59
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Loop through the list, keep track of the current number, how many times it has been repeated, and compare that to the most times youve seen that number repeated.

Counts={}
Current=0
Current_Count=0
LIST = [1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1]
for i in LIST:
    if Current == i:
        Current_Count++
    else:
        Current_Count=1
        Current=i
    if Current_Count>Counts[i]:
        Counts[i]=Current_Count
print Counts
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If you want it for just any element (i.e. the element with the most repetitions), you could use:

def f((v, l, m), x):
    nl = l+1 if x==v else 1
    return (x, nl, max(m,nl))

maxrep = reduce(f, l, (0,0,0))[2];

This only counts continuous repetitions (Result for [1,2,2,2,1,2] would be 3) and only records the element with the the maximum number.

Edit: Made definition of f a bit shorter ...

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Seems akin to a lot of Perl stuff? ;) –  Lakshman Prasad May 20 '09 at 11:51
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This is my solution:

def longest_repetition(l):
    if l == []:
        return None

    element = l[0]
    new = []
    lar = []

    for e in l:            
        if e == element:
            new.append(e)
        else:
            if len(new) > len(lar):
                lar = new
            new = []
            new.append(e)
            element = e
    if len(new) > len(lar):
        lar = new    
    return lar[0]
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-You can make new copy of the list but with unique values and a corresponding hits list.

-Then get the Max of hits list and get from it's index your most repeated item.

oldlist = ["A", "B", "E", "C","A", "C","D","A", "E"]
newlist=[]
hits=[]
for i in range(len(oldlist)):
    if oldlist[i] in newlist:
        hits[newlist.index(oldlist[i])]+= 1
    else:
        newlist.append(oldlist[i])
        hits.append(1);
#find the most repeated item
temp_max_hits=max(hits)
temp_max_hits_index=hits.index(temp_max_hits)
print(newlist[temp_max_hits_index])
print(temp_max_hits)

But I don't know is this the fastest way to do that or there are faster solution. If you think there are faster or more efficient solution, kindly inform us.

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I'd use a hashmap of item to counter.

Every time you see a 'key' succession, increment its counter value. If you hit a new element, set the counter to 1 and keep going. At the end of this linear search, you should have the maximum succession count for each number.

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This code seems to work:

l = [1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1]
previous = None

# value/repetition pair
greatest = (-1, -1)
reps = 1

for e in l:
    if e == previous:
        reps += 1
    else:
        if reps > greatest[1]:
            greatest = (previous, reps)

        previous = e
        reps = 1

if reps > greatest[1]:
    greatest = (previous, reps)

print greatest
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+1 for beating me to it. –  geowa4 May 19 '09 at 23:30
3  
that's not what OP is asking –  SilentGhost May 19 '09 at 23:35
    
OP even gave the test case...which your results don't match... –  Jason Punyon May 19 '09 at 23:38
    
-1 to counter George's +1 on an incorrect answer –  Sparr May 19 '09 at 23:44
    
I edited with a new algorithm. Please give me your advice. –  Bastien Léonard May 20 '09 at 0:06
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