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I have email field in user's settings area. All emails are unique, of course, so I need to check is email not used already by someone else before submitting the form.

Here is the code:

var email = $("input#email-id").val();

$("#form-id").submit(function(){
    $.ajax({
        url: "/ajax/email?email=" + email,
        success: function(data){
            if(data != 'ok'){
                alert("Email is used already");
                return false;
            }
        }
    });
});

So, if data is not 'ok' it must destroy submitting the form because if() returns false, but it doesn't and the form submits as usual and even alert doesn't appear!

I've checked ajax answer and it works fine (returns 'user_already' if email is used). So what I did wrong?

Thanks!

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2  
Why would you use AJAX in combination with a standard Form submission? Just pick one or the other. –  maxedison Jan 13 '12 at 18:41
1  
@maxedison because the app should run even in the absence of JavaScript? –  Behrang Jan 13 '12 at 18:45
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since ajax is async by nature you cannot do that. If you really want to do that you can submit the form inside the success handler. Try this.

function submitHandler(){
    var email = $("input#email-id").val();

    $.ajax({
        url: "/ajax/email?email=" + email,
        success: function(data){
            if(data != 'ok'){
                alert("Email is used already");
                return false;
            }
            else{
               //Once the data is ok you can unbind the submit handler and 
               //then submit the form so that the handler is not called this time
               $("#form-id").unbind('submit').submit();
            } 
        }
    });
    return false;//This will prevent the form to submit
}
$("#form-id").submit(submitHandler);
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It works very nice! Thanks a lot. –  Vitali Ponomar Jan 13 '12 at 18:57
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It's because the Ajax request to check the email is asynchronous. It will not complete before the submit event handler is finished. You'd have to do something like this:

$('#form-id').submit(function() {

    if($(this).data('valid')) {
        //you've already validated, allow the form to submit
        return true;
    } else {
        //send an ajax request and wait for the response to really submit
        $.ajax({
            url: "/ajax/email?email=" + email,
            success: function(data){
                if(data == 'ok') {
                    //submit the form again, but set valid data so you don't do another Ajax request
                    $('#form-id').data('valid', true);
                    $('#form-id').submit();
                } else {
                    alert("Email is used already");
                }
            }
        });
        return false;
    }

    //clear the validation flat
    $(this).data('valid', false);

});
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1  
Using the $.data method is quite a bit faster than .data(), check-out this JSPerf: jsperf.com/jquery-data-vs-jqueryselection-data/17 –  Jasper Jan 13 '12 at 19:00
    
good to know, thanks. –  alexp Jan 13 '12 at 19:03
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There's an accepted answer but I thought I'd share another way to do this.

You can use an extra parameter with the .trigger() function to first test the user's email, and if it comes back available then re-trigger the submit event but set a flag to not check the username:

$("#form-id").submit(function(event, forceSubmit){

    //the normal submit will not have the extra parameter so we need to initialize it to not throw any errors,
    //typeof is great for this since it always returns a string
    if (typeof(forceSubmit) == 'undefined') { forceSubmit = false; }

    //now check if this is a normal submit or flagged to allow submission
    if (forceSubmit === false) {
        var $form = $(this);
        $.ajax({
            url: "/ajax/email?email=" + email,
            success: function(data){
                if(data != 'ok'){
                    alert("Email is used already");
                } else {
                    $form.trigger(submit, true);
                }
            }
        });

        //since this submit event is for checking the username's availability we return false to basically: event.preventDefault(); event.stopPropagation();
        return false;
    }
});

.trigger(): http://api.jquery.com/trigger

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In your code you have two functions. One is the function passed to submit:

$("#form-id").submit(function() {
  // code
});

The other is the function passed to the success handler of the AJAX call:

success: function(data) {
  // code
}

You are returning false from the second function. This means that when the first function returns, it is not returning false. But the form submission is stopped, only if the first function returns false.

What you should do is to make the function passed to submit always return false and handle submission programmatically.

This code helps you to achieve this:

var submitHandler = function() {
  $.ajax({
      url: "/ajax/email?email=" + email,
      success: function(data) {
          if (data != 'ok') {
              alert("Email is used already");
              // no need to do anything here
          } else {
             // success, we should submit the form programmatically
             // first we de-attach the handler, so that submitHandler won't be called again
             // and then we submit
             $("#form-id").unbind('submit').submit();
             // now we reattach the handler, so that submit handler is executed if the user
             // submits the form again
             $("#form-id").submit(submitHandler);
          }
      }
  });

  // always return false, because if validation succeeds, we will submit the
  // form using JavaScript
  return false;
};

$("#form-id").submit(submitHandler);
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I already +1 @ShankarSangoli because he got it right however, I don't feel its 100% complete as there is also an error state that can occur upon network issues or server fault.

$('#form-id').submit(function(ev) {
    ev.preventDefault(); // cancels event in jQuery typical fashion
    $.ajax({
        url: "/ajax/email",
        data : { email: $("input#email-id").val()},
        success : function(d) {
            if (d !== 'ok') {
                alert('email in use');
            }
        },
        error : function(a,b,c) {
            // put your error handling here
            alert('a connection error occured');
        }
    }); 
});

There are even better ways to handle this as I've written some great form plugins for jQuery that are HTML5 compliant and rival jQuery tools for ease of use.

You can see an example here -> http://www.zipstory.com/signup

Happy coding.

share|improve this answer
    
why -1? Who dat is? –  Jason Sebring Jan 13 '12 at 19:35
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If JSON is involved, the returned data is in data.d - see http://encosia.com/a-breaking-change-between-versions-of-aspnet-ajax/ for an explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
Am I missing something or is this for asp.net JSON responses? The server response in the question appears to be returning plain text. –  Jasper Jan 13 '12 at 19:04
    
@Jasper I was wrong - I spent so long looking up things I missed that more replies and a correct answer were supplied while I was doing that. If I delete my incorrect answer, will this comment and yours disappear, or is it worth leaving it for people who do need to use data.d? –  Andrew Morton Jan 13 '12 at 20:37
    
If you feel your answer has useful information then leave it, otherwise when you delete the answer only users with more than 10,000 rep will be able to see it (and the comments). Although this question doesn't reference JSON anywhere which is where your answer comes into play. –  Jasper Jan 13 '12 at 20:40
    
I feel the best I can do is qualify it by editing to add "If JSON is involved". –  Andrew Morton Jan 13 '12 at 20:56
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