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I'm trying to understand how LINQ can be used to group data by intervals of time; and then ideally aggregate each group.

Finding numerous examples with explicit date ranges, I'm trying to group by periods such as 5-minutes, 1-hour, 1-day.

For example, I have a class that wraps a DateTime with a value:

public class Sample
{
     public DateTime timestamp;
     public double value;
}

These observations are contained as a series in a List collection:

List<Sample> series;

So, to group by hourly periods of time and aggregate value by average, I'm trying to do something like:

var grouped = from s in series
              group s by new TimeSpan(1, 0, 0) into g
              select new { timestamp = g.Key, value = g.Average(s => s.value };

This is fundamentally flawed, as it groups the TimeSpan itself. I can't understand how to use the TimeSpan (or any data type representing an interval) in the query.

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1  
Would you describe your question with sample data? –  Ali Amiri Jan 13 '12 at 19:51
2  
@AliAmiri - I think it's clear enough. Sample outputs might help. –  Henk Holterman Jan 13 '12 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You could round the time stamp to the next boundary (i.e. down to the closest 5 minute boundary in the past) and use that as your grouping:

var groups = series.GroupBy(x =>
{
    var stamp = x.timestamp;
    stamp = stamp.AddMinutes(-(stamp.Minute % 5));
    stamp = stamp.AddMilliseconds(-stamp.Millisecond - 1000 * stamp.Second);
    return stamp;
})
.Select(g => new { TimeStamp = g.Key, Value = g.Average(s => s.value) })
.ToList();

Above achieves that by using a modified time stamp in the grouping, which sets the minutes to the previous 5 minute boundary and removes the seconds and milliseconds. The same approach of course can be used for other time periods, i.e. hours and days.

Edit:

Based on this made up sample input:

var series = new List<Sample>();
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(3) });
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(4) });
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(5) });
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(6) });
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(7) });
series.Add(new Sample() { timestamp = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(15) });

3 groups were produced for me, one with grouping timestamp 3:05, one with 3:10 and one with 3:20 pm (your results may vary based on current time).

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What's a difference between your new time span and available timespans for items? you just changed the bias. –  Ali Amiri Jan 13 '12 at 19:54
    
@AliAmiri: it groups items that fall into the same 5 minute interval into the same group by returning the same timestamp for all of those items - wasn't that what OP intended? –  BrokenGlass Jan 13 '12 at 19:56
    
I don't think so. You just move them to 5 minute before (also i don't know OP want's do what you tried to show or not). –  Ali Amiri Jan 13 '12 at 19:59
    
@AliAmiri: I tested this and it works fine for grouping - note that it uses a % (modulo) and its NOT just moving the sample to 5 minutes before. –  BrokenGlass Jan 13 '12 at 20:04
    
Ops I missed the percent:D I see it as minus:| –  Ali Amiri Jan 13 '12 at 20:06

You need a function that rounds your timestampes . Something like:

 var grouped = from s in series
          group s by new DateTime(s.timestamp.Year, s.timestamp.Month,  
                s.timestamp.Day, s.timestamp.Hour, 0, 0) into g
          select new { timestamp = g.Key, value = g.Average(s => s.value };

For hourly bins. And note that the timestamp in the result will now be a DateTime, not a TimeSpan.

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Phenomenal!! This is also what I was looking for! Thanks so much! Although this is more elegant, I think I'm going accept BrokenGlass' answer as it enables me to group by periods like 5-minutes, which I think yours groups to unit of time, like seconds or minutes or hours, etc... but not 5-minute intervals. –  Jason Sturges Jan 13 '12 at 20:33

For grouping by hour you need to group by the hour part of your timestamp which could be done as so:

var groups = from s in series
  let groupKey = new DateTime(s.timestamp.Year, s.timestamp.Month, s.timestamp.Day, s.timestamp.Hour, 0, 0)
  group s by groupKey into g select new
                                      {
                                        TimeStamp = g.Key,
                                        Value = g.Average(a=>a.value)
                                      };
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I'm very late to the game on this one, but I came accross this while searching for something else, and I thought i had a better way.

series.GroupBy (s => s.timestamp.Ticks / TimeSpan.FromHours(1).Ticks)
        .Select (s => new {
            series = s
            ,timestamp = s.First ().timestamp
            ,average = s.Average (x => x.value )
        }).Dump();

Here is a sample linqpad program so you can validate and test

void Main()
{
    List<Sample> series = new List<Sample>();

    Random random = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);
    for (DateTime i = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5); i < DateTime.Now; i += TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1))
    {
        series.Add(new UserQuery.Sample(){ timestamp = i, value = random.NextDouble() * 100 });
    }
    //series.Dump();
    series.GroupBy (s => s.timestamp.Ticks / TimeSpan.FromHours(1).Ticks)
        .Select (s => new {
            series = s
            ,timestamp = s.First ().timestamp
            ,average = s.Average (x => x.value )
        }).Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
public class Sample
{
     public DateTime timestamp;
     public double value;
}
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