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I have a box defined that works for most of my site:

.searchBox
{
    width: 610px;
    height: 170px;
    padding: 15px 55px 5px 15px;
    background: url('../images/advanced_search_BG.jpg') no-repeat;
    margin-top: 10px;
}

But I have one box that needs to be a little bigger; it has to be height: 220px.

I know I could duplicate the above, calling it, say searchBoxLarge, put that on my div tag, and be done. But that's duplicate code that I don't want.

This might be a 'dumb question', but I'm not trained in CSS and looking for assistance...

What is the format to specify the searchBoxLarge with the height: 220px, but without duplicating the entire searchBox entry?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Add searchBoxLarge to the searchBox declaration, and then make a separate declaration for just searchBoxLarge which overwrites the height value.

.searchBox, .searchBoxLarge
{
    width: 610px;
    height: 170px;
    padding: 15px 55px 5px 15px;
    background: url('../images/advanced_search_BG.jpg') no-repeat;
    margin-top: 10px;
}

.searchBoxLarge
{
    height: 220px;
}
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I think he needed the height to be 220px, not the width. –  j08691 Jan 13 '12 at 20:08
    
@j08691 my bad, updated again –  George P Jan 13 '12 at 20:10
    
@Oded - I'm inclined to think it does... jsfiddle.net/pGckA –  motoxer4533 Jan 13 '12 at 20:11
    
@AlanWeibel, he should only have to use .searchBoxLarge or .searchBox, never both –  George P Jan 13 '12 at 20:11
    
If you're adding both classes to the same element there is no need to select them both in CSS. –  BoltClock Jan 13 '12 at 20:12

There was a good article about doing this on SitePoint http://www.sitepoint.com/first-look-object-oriented-css/

I would suggest you read the responses to the article since there are some drawbacks to doing your CSS like this, and also some benefits.

I agree the name Object Oriented CSS is misleading because there is no true sub-typing

Cheers! Orin

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