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I'm have an intended task that is supposed to execute every 10 seconds. It works when I just run the project, meaning, it will run() once, but it will not the subsequent time. Can someone tell me which part is wrong..I spent hours trying to remedy this problem but to no avail :( This is my main:

public static void main(String[] args)  {

    launch(TestingApp.class, args);


    Timer timer = new Timer();
    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Cost(), 10*1000, 10*1000);}

This is the Cost code:

public class Cost extends TimerTask {

   public void run() {
      Calendar rightNow = Calendar.getInstance();
      Integer hour = rightNow.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);

      if (hour == 3) {
         try {

            File file = new File("D:/TESTAPP/Testing.csv");
            if (file != null) {
               Opencsv csv = new Opencsv();

               csv.Csvreader();

            }
         } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Cost.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
         }
      }

      else {

      }
   }
}

Some of the methods I tried was ending a thread.sleep to the end of Cost code, and the other method I tried was added a while(true) my main...

share|improve this question
    
nice "creative" indentation style. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '12 at 20:11
    
How is that related to solving the problem? –  Eugene Jan 13 '12 at 20:14
1  
If you want us to be able to help you, it's in your best interest not to make it hard for us to read and understand your code. We're all volunteers, and if you ask us to put in the effort, you should do the same. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '12 at 20:16
    
Possible problem: your csv.Csvreader(); is blocking the thread. Do this in a background thread. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '12 at 20:18
    
sorry about that, I thought by indenting the different blocks will make it much easier to read, maybe it's just my perspective. Ok, I will take a look at the csvreader –  Eugene Jan 13 '12 at 20:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suspect that this:

Opencsv csv = new Opencsv();
csv.Csvreader();

is blocking the timer's thread. Have you tried doing this in a background thread?

For example, your code is equivalent to this:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class TestTimer {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Timer timer = new Timer();
      timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

         @Override
         public void run() {
           System.out.println("here");
           try {
              Thread.sleep(10 * 1000);
           } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
         }
      }, 1000, 1000);
   }
}

I'm suggesting that instead you do the inner stuff in a background thread so as not to slow the Timer down. Note the different times of execution of this:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class TestTimer {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Timer timer = new Timer();
      timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

         @Override
         public void run() {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {
               public void run() {
                  System.out.println("here");
                  try {
                     Thread.sleep(10 * 1000);
                  } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
               }
            }).start();
         }
      }, 1000, 1000);
   }
}

Edit 2
Again, your question has a "swing" tag suggesting that your question involves code that is part of a Swing GUI. If so, then the recommendations may need to be different, especially if any of your code needs to be called on the Swing event thread.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, I'm still figuring this out...I'm new to background threading, let me try to incorporate to my code –  Eugene Jan 13 '12 at 20:34
    
@EugeneWong: again, your question has a "swing" tag suggesting that your question involves code that is part of a Swing GUI. If so, then the recommendations may need to be different, especially if any of your code needs to be called on the Swing event thread. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '12 at 20:38
    
Ah..I managed to understand and got it working. Thanks alot! I really appreciate your help! I can finally sleep at last after hours on this. Thanks again! –  Eugene Jan 13 '12 at 20:54
    
Yep, I'm using swing for gui, but I'm really noob to this at the moment. I followed through a netbean tutorial on quick gui. I'm currently getting some codes, and later on integrate into the swing gui codes –  Eugene Jan 13 '12 at 20:55
    
@EugeneWong: then my answer may not be correct. You understand that your question uses a java.util.Timer, and that Swing has its own Timer class, javax.swing.Timer. There's a good chance that you may be better off using a Swing Timer so that code that needs to be called on Swing's event thread is called on the event thread. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 13 '12 at 20:57

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