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I am using jQuery now to dynamically generate DIVs based off user input. With the nature of how these are generated and formatted, there's no direct parent/child relationship between the DIVs. In fact, I suppose the simplest way to explain it is the generation of a tree. I want to be able to create a custom hierarchy such that if an element at the top of the tree is deleted, so are all of it's pseudo-children.

A somewhat visiual example follows below. The Diagram follows a horizontal hierarchy.

Level 1   Level 2    Level 3
-----------------------------

   X        X          X  \
                       X   | >> These 3 elements are pseudo-children of 
                       X  /     the first elements in level 1 and level 2

            X   <<<<<< X  << The element in level 2 is pseudo-child of  
                       X     the first element in level 1

   X        X          X

            X          X
                       X     

UPDATE:

Code Example:

<tr>
  <td>Level1</td>
  <td>Level2</td>
  <td>Level3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td />
  <td />
  <td>Level3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td />
  <td />
  <td>Level3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td />
  <td>Level2</td>
  <td>Level3</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td />
  <td />
  <td>Level3</td>
</tr>

etc... (matching the diagram)

share|improve this question
    
Are the level containers siblings? –  Šime Vidas Jan 13 '12 at 20:30
    
Not really. It's table-formatted. So a level is a column, and a relationship is a row with specific TD's filled with content –  Kyle Macey Jan 13 '12 at 20:32
    
So, when you delete an element at the top (an element from the first column), just delete the entire row (with all the pseudo-children). That wouldn't do it? –  Šime Vidas Jan 13 '12 at 20:34
    
It would delete the parent if it shared the row, as well as only the first direct pseudo child. –  Kyle Macey Jan 13 '12 at 20:36
1  
Then you just need to keep deleting subsequent rows until you reach a row with an element of the same level... and also make sure that you don't delete the first row if it contains a parent element (but instead only clear the cells from the element to the right). –  Šime Vidas Jan 13 '12 at 20:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think what you want is the Flexible Box Module in HTML5. See a really nice set of articles about it here

And the playground http://flexiejs.com/playground/ (along with a x-browser javascript library)


My guess is the only way to do this with a table in the UI is to also store a tree in memory and then use that to "know" what to delete.


Maybe I'm missing something but what is wrong with this:

<div id="a">
   <div id="b">
      <div id="c" />
      <div id="d" />
      <div id="e" />
   </div>
   <div id="f">
      <div id="g" />
      <div id="h" />
   </div>
</div>
<div id="i">
   <div id="j">
      <div id="k" />
   </div>
   <div id="l>
      <div id="m" />
   </div>
</div>



Level 1   Level 2    Level 3
-----------------------------

   a        b          c  \
                       d   | >> These 3 elements are pseudo-children of 
                       e  /     the first elements in level 1 and level 2

            f   <<<<<< g  << The element in level 2 is pseudo-child of  
                       h     the first element in level 1

   i        j          k

            l          m
                       n
share|improve this answer
    
The hierarchy is built using a drag and drop system. Unfortunately, this method becomes messy for user error. –  Kyle Macey Jan 13 '12 at 20:34
    
+1 for the way I wish this could have worked out in the first place. After trying it for a bit, formatting and event listener interference became too much –  Kyle Macey Jan 13 '12 at 20:35
    
@KyleMacey -- see edit –  Hogan Jan 13 '12 at 20:48
    
Your answer would technically fulfill exactly what I need, there just isn't really the browser support for it yet. I believe I'll go with using custom attributes for the elements as described in my comment on the OP. Thanks, though, you've opened me up to a whole new world of flexibility! –  Kyle Macey Jan 13 '12 at 20:59

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