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With the code below I'm getting: "The name 'listener' does not exist in the current context"

Really? Why?

static void ReceiveSocketMsgs()
{
    try
    {
        TcpListener listener;
        listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, MainForm.GOHRFTrackerMainForm.socketPortNum);
        listener.Start();
        using (TcpClient c = listener.AcceptTcpClient())
        {
            using (NetworkStream n = c.GetStream())
            {
                string msg = new BinaryReader(n).ReadString();
                BinaryWriter w = new BinaryWriter(n);
                w.Write(msg + " received");
                w.Flush(); // Must call Flush because we're not disposing the writer. 
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //some exception (if you close the app, it will be "threadabort")
    }
    finally
    {
        listener.Stop();
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That's just how C# scoping works. It does get in the way in lock statements and try/catch clauses. Just move the declaration outside:

static void ReceiveSocketMsgs()
{
    TcpListener listener = null;
    try
    {
        listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, MainForm.GOHRFTrackerMainForm.socketPortNum);
        ...
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //some exception (if you close the app, it will be "threadabort")
    }
    finally
    {
        if (listener != null)
            listener.Stop();
    }
}

To keep the listener initialization inside the try block, initialize the variable to null and check that before calling Stop.

Fixed the initialisation. Well spotted BoltClock.

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Or check for null in finally. What happens if an exception is thrown from TcpListener()? –  D Stanley Jan 13 '12 at 20:58
    
I'm not so sure of my initial observation actually, but maybe I'm just tired and need a break :) Either way, defensive programming is always good. –  BoltClock Jan 13 '12 at 20:59
    
@BoltClock Fixed, thanks. Your observation was correct; the code wouldn't have compiled :) –  romkyns Jan 13 '12 at 20:59

Because you defined the variable in the scope of the try block. Since you're outside of the try block inside the finally block, you no longer have access to the variable.

The simple fix is to declare the listener outside of the scope of the try block so you have access to it everywhere you need.

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Because listener is stopped outside the scope where it is declared. It is only available in the try (but not catch or finally) block in this case.

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You are thinking the try scope is the whole try, catch(s) and the finally, but scopes are the area's between { }'s

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Because C# is a C based language.

{
  int x = 5;

  // x is 5 here
}

// x is undefined out here.

local scope vs global scope

When defined in {} everything is local within {}.

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