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public class BitStringOperations3
{

public static void main (String args[])
 {
  Scanner in = new Scanner (System.in);

  int setA = 0;
  int setB = 0;
  int elementsSetA = 0;
  int elementsSetB = 0;


  System.out.println ("How many integers are in set A?");
  elementsSetA = in.nextInt ();
    while (elementsSetA > 9 || elementsSetA < 0)
      {
       System.out.println ("This input is invalid. Please enter a number between 0 and 9 and try again.");
        elementsSetA = in.nextInt();
      }



  System.out.println ("How many integers are in set B?");
  elementsSetB = in.nextInt ();
    while (elementsSetB > 9 || elementsSetB < 0)
      {
       System.out.println ("This input is invalid. Please enter a number between 0 and 9 and try again.");
        elementsSetB = in.nextInt();
      }




    for (int i = 1; i <= elementsSetA; i++)
     {
      System.out.println ("Please enter integer number " + i + " in set A: ");
       setA = add(setA, in.nextInt() );
     }

     for (int i = 1; i <= elementsSetB; i++)
      {
       System.out.println ("Please enter integer number " + i + " in set B: ");
        setB = add(setB, in.nextInt () );
      }








 }


 public static boolean setContainsValue (int set, int value)
 {
boolean setContainsValue = (set & maskForValue) != 0;
return true;
 }


 public static int addValueToSet (int set, int newValue)
 {
 set = set | maskForValue;
 return set;
 }

 public static void printSet (int set, int value)
{
 int mask = 1;
 System.out.print ("{");
  for (int i = 0; i<= 9; i++)
  {
    if(( mask & set ) == 1)
     System.out.print(i + " " );
        int maskForValue = 1 << value;
        set >>= 1; //set = (set >> 1);

  }

  System.out.println ("} ");


}







  }

I am having trouble with an assignment for school. We are given the universal set U = {0-9}. I have to gather user input for both sets, and then use bit strings (we are not allowed to use the Set or HashSet classes in java) to store the sets and perform operations on them, such as complement, Set A union Set B and such. I know how to do those, but my code does not convert Sets A and B into the memory correctly and therefore, I cannot perform any operations on them. Help will be gladly appreciated! Thanks in advance. :)

Edit 1:

Alright, I read your ideas and tried to implement them as good as I could, and I have given the result above. This program really pushes me out of my comfort zone and I really appreciate all the help.

share|improve this question
1  
You have given us a lot of code and only said that it "does not convert...correctly." Please give more detail (e.g. a valid input, what you expect as the output, and what it actually gives) and give only the part of the code that is not working for you. –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:02
    
That is true. Let's say the user gives me 1, 3 and 5 in set A. I want to display {1,3,5} on the screen, but instead it displays {0-8}, whatever input I do. That is what I cannot figure out. –  Hot Shot Jan 13 '12 at 21:06
    
Given the skill gap between your current Java experience and what this assignment demands of you (and your admission that it's out of your comfort zone), I highly, highly recommend getting in-person help from your teacher/professor/TA rather than trying to learn the extreme basics of (Java) programming here. This simply isn't a good forum to teach; it's a Q&A site. –  Mark Peters Jan 14 '12 at 5:17

2 Answers 2

First, you need a class (this is object-oriented programming, right?) to contain the "DigitSet".

public DigitSet {

   private BitSet digits;

   public DigitSet() {
     // digits contains one bit for each digit
     digits = new BitSet(10);
   }

   ... rest of DigitSet code goes here, like ...
   /**
    * Check if this set contains a particular digit.
    */
   public boolean contains(int value) {
     // check to see if value is a valid input (0-9)
     // look in digits to see if the "right" bit is set.
   }

   public void set(int value) {
     // check to see if value is a valid input (0-9)
     // set the "right" bit in digits to 1.
   }

   public void clear(int value) {
     // check to see if value is a valid input (0-9)
     // set the "right" bit in digits to 0.         
   }

   public DigitSet union(DigitSet other) {
     // construct a "new" output DigitSet.
     // Walk through all of the digits in "this" set
       // if a digit is set in this set, set it in the output set.
     // Walk through all of the digits in the "other" set
       // if a digit is set in the other set, set it in the output set.
   }

   public String toString() {
     // return a display string based on the set "digit" bits
   }

}

Then the rest is just input handling and "perform the operation"

public static void main(String[] args) {
  DigitSet first = new DigitSet();
  // read in the values for the first digit set, for each value
    // set the digit in first like so
    first.set(value);
  DigitSet second = new DigitSet();
  // read in the values for the second digit set, for each value
    second.set(value);

  DigitSet result = first.union(second);
  System.out.println("Result: " + result.toString());

}
share|improve this answer

First of all, do yourself a favour and create helper methods. Then concentrate only on making them correct:

public static boolean contains(int set, int value) {
   //return true if value bit is 1 in set
}

public static int add(int set, int newValue) {
   //add newValue to set and return it
}

Afterwards you can express your logic more clearly:

if ( contains(set, 1) ) {
   //print 1
}

Some general hints:

  • Don't use Math.pow() as that is made for floating-point numbers. To get a power of 2 as an integer, use bit shifting:

    int maskForValue = 1 << value;
    
  • To check if a certain bit is set, find the mask for that bit and use &. This zeros out all bits except for the bit you're checking.

    boolean setContainsValue = (set & maskForValue) != 0;
    
  • To set a bit in a bit field, find the mask for that bit and use |. This ensures that that bit becomes 1.

    set = set | maskForValue;
    

Edit

As to your direct problem, take a look at this:

  for (int i = 1; i <= elementsSetB; i++)
  {
     System.out.println ("Please enter integer number " + i + " in set B: ");
     setB = in.nextInt ();
  }

You're overwriting setA and setB every time. In the end, setA and setB will contain the last value the user specified. Then later, you do this:

  for (int i = 0; i <=9; i++)
     setB |= (int)pow(2.0, i-1);

Which just ignores the user's input and overwrites all bits 0-9 (though in an unsafe way!). So of course what the user inputs is irrelevant.

Get rid of the latter for loops and then store the input like this (using the helper methods I described above):

  for (int i = 1; i <= elementsSetB; i++)
  {
     System.out.println ("Please enter integer number " + i + " in set B: ");
     setB = add(setB, in.nextInt());
  }

Edit 2

You seem to be having problems understanding where I'm coming from with my idea of these "helper" methods. If this is the first time you've worked with methods that have parameters, sorry for clouding up the issue. But they allow you to focus on getting one piece of functionality working at a time. I'll expand on what I mean more here:

public static boolean setContainsValue(int set, int value) {
   //return true if the bit string (or bit set) represented by the "set" parameter
   //contains the value stored in the "value" parameter
   //see the FIRST and SECOND bullet points above for how to do this
}

public static int addValueToSet(int originalSet, int valueToAdd) {
   //add the value stored in the "valueToAdd" parameter to the set represented by the
   //"originalSet" parameter and return the result
   //see the FIRST and THIRD bullet points above for how to do this.
}

I'll even write some tests for you too. The methods above haven't been implemented properly until at least all of the following print true:

int set = 0;

System.out.println( ! contains(set, 1) ); //make sure set doesn't contain 1

set = addValueToSet(set, 1);
System.out.println( contains(set, 1) ); //make sure set now contains 1
System.out.println( !contains(set, 2) ); //make sure set doesn't contain 2

set = addValueToSet(set, 2);
System.out.println( contains(set, 1) ); //make sure set still contains 1
System.out.println( contains(set, 2) ); //make sure set now contains 2
share|improve this answer
    
@Hot Shot: And do you have any justification for why you think those would do anything useful? Just an explanation, I mean "set" to mean "the bit set" and "value" to mean "the value you're testing for or trying to add". Clearly a contains function that doesn't actually look at the set that it's passed won't do anything useful. Also, please edit your question with updates if possible. –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:32
    
(Hint: I gave you the exact code you need to use to make contains and add work, all you need to do is put the statements together). –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:37
    
@Hot Shot: Please learn to test your code rather than have others tell you whether it works ok. If you want to know if it's better, TRY IT! Does it do what it's supposed to do? And again I'll reiterate: if a method is supposed to check whether value is in set, and doesn't even look at the set parameter, it is surely wrong. –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:45
    
@Hot Shot: I've given you pretty specific instructions that you've chosen to ignore to this point. I've now updated my answer again to be incredibly detailed but I am not going to do your assignment for you and it seems like that's what you want. So please carefully try my suggestions (not just superficially) do some research and if (only after have made a good effort) it still doesn't work, then keep asking for clarification. –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:56
    
@Hot Shot: If you can't compile, edit the compile error message into your question and clearly state where it occurs. I notice that you have not made your helper functions static like the ones in my answer are. That would certainly cause an error. –  Mark Peters Jan 13 '12 at 21:57

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