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I am working on a generic class and am working on handling errors. I am using a try catch on one spot where I am getting an error. The question is, how do I return that error back to the calling method?

    public static DataTable GetData(string connString, string sqlStatement, Action<iDB2ParameterCollection> parameters)
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();

        using (iDB2Connection conn = new iDB2Connection(connString))
        {
            using (iDB2Command cmd = new iDB2Command(sqlStatement, conn))
            {
                conn.Open();
                if (parameters != null) { parameters(cmd.Parameters); }
                try
                {
                    using (iDB2DataAdapter da = new iDB2DataAdapter(cmd)) { da.Fill(dt); }
                }
                catch (iDB2SQLErrorException e)
                {
                }

                conn.Close();
            }
        }

        return dt;
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

We do this, for the same reason you appear to be doing it. So that you can ensure the connection is closed.

We just re-throw the same error and lose the connection in the "finally" block. This lets the connection be closed and still bubble the connection back up to the caller, because the "finally" block gets executed regardless.

catch (iDB2SQLErrorException e) 
{ 
   throw e;
} 
finally
{
   cn.Close();
}

The above code is what we've used for years, but thanks to the comments, I think it might need tweaking. See this blog post for info on how to preserve the stack trace with exception handling: http://weblogs.asp.net/fmarguerie/archive/2008/01/02/rethrowing-exceptions-and-preserving-the-full-call-stack-trace.aspx

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Now this is more along the lines as to what I was trying to figure out. –  Mike Wills Jan 13 '12 at 22:25
1  
Doesn't throw e; as opposed to throw; clear the original call stack in the exception? –  Greg B Jan 13 '12 at 22:26
    
@GregB Correct so this is going to have a pretty big drawback when trying to debug issues. This is why I'm not a fan. –  Feisty Mango Jan 13 '12 at 22:29
    
@Greg B - there is a difference. You were right. Edited. –  David Stratton Jan 13 '12 at 22:33

By not catching it in a base class!

I am not a fan of capturing and swallowing exceptions at the base class level.

Let your derived classes worry about these details.

Side Note (Evidence of position): You'll notice that in practically any API, the doucmentation will report what exceptions will be thrown with classes. If they were to catch them in a base class, they have effectively swallowed them rendering you helpless as the user of said classes.

Additional Articles:

...instead of writing our abstractions based on details, the we should write the details based on abstractions.

This is a core tenant of Dependency Inversion Principle.

Take a look at this article for some really good things to consider in your design process, http://www.oodesign.com/design-principles.html

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Oh. so let the calling code handle it? –  Mike Wills Jan 13 '12 at 22:14
1  
@MikeWillis Absolutely! That is the right approach. Not only do you make it pretty much impossible to handle them. You also set yourself up for having to try and think up every possible case in which a derived class will cause the exception to be thrown. (You won't be able to do so, nor should you). –  Feisty Mango Jan 13 '12 at 22:17
    
I haven't made something like this that was so universal (at least in my world), so I wasn't sure if I should be handling the errors or not. –  Mike Wills Jan 13 '12 at 22:21
    
This doesn't let him close the connection gracefully, and when dealing with the accursed iDB2 objects, that's even more of an issue than with SQL Server. In my experience, the iseries isn't as forgiving of failure to close connections as SQL Server. However, I agree with you 100% on not handling them at the base level. My answer shows how we got around the connection issue while bubbling the exception up to a higher level. –  David Stratton Jan 13 '12 at 22:23
    
@MikeWills Just always be wary of the temptation to design one class to rule them all (universal classes as you put it). It will lead you down the path of darkness. –  Feisty Mango Jan 13 '12 at 22:23
  1. You could implement some logic to handle to exception internally in this method and re-throw it again. The exception will bubble up in the call stack;
  2. Other option is to use error codes to pass the error up in the stack. It depends on the API.
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Either don't catch it and let the caller handle it, or throw your own error that wraps the original one:

class DataRetrievalException : Exception {
    DataRetrievalException(String message, Exception cause) : base(message, cause) {}
}

// ...
catch (iDB2SQLErrorException e) {
    throw new DataRetrievalException("Error retrieving data from database", e);
}
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