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[regex]::replace('test test','^(.*?)test', 'barf')

returns 'barf test'

Why doesn't it replace all occurrences of 'test'? This must have something to do with the position at which a subsequent replace iteration begins.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Quick answer: you anchored it at the beginning of the input (^) and your first group ((.*?)) did not capture anything (since the first occurrence of test was found right after the beginning of line and you use a lazy quantifier -- furthermore you don't use the capture in your replacement string. Had you used a "normal" quantifier, the last occurrence of test would have been replaced).

Long answer: a regex never needs to match the whole input, only the parts which are necessary. What's more, when cycling through an input, the regex engine will start the next round from the position where it successfully completed a match.

Here, you want to replace a sequence of characters which is test. Note that it will also means that testosterone will be matched (or untested). If you want to match test as a "word", use the word anchor \b.

This works (tested on Powershell v2):

[regex]::replace('test test','\btest\b', 'barf')

The engine in action looks something like this:

# beginning
regex: |\btest\b
input: |test test
# \b: matched,  beginning of input followed by word character
regex: \b|test\b
input: |test test
# literal matching of t, then e, then s, then t
regex: \btest|\b
input: test| test
# \b: match, word character followed by non word character
regex: \btest\b|
input: test| test
# replacement
regex: \btest\b|
input: barf| test
# beginning of second round
regex: |\btest\b
input: barf| test
# \b: match, word character followed by non word character
regex: \b|test\b
input: barf| test
# t: not matched. Failed matching. Proceeding to next character
regex: |\btest\b
input: barf |test
# \b: match
regex: \b|test\b
input: barf |test
# literal matching of t, then e, then s, then t
regex: \btest|\b
input: barf test|
# \b: match, word character followed by end of input
regex: \btest\b|
input: barf test|
# replacement
regex: \btest\b|
input: barf barf|
# beginning of next round
regex: |\btest\b
input: barf barf|
# end of input: end of processing
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The OP asked about the behaviour of a specific regex - there is no way anyone can say it is 'wrong'. –  Borodin Jan 13 '12 at 23:26
    
@Borodin when a regex is misleaded, it is misleaded. (.*?) serves no purpose. –  fge Jan 14 '12 at 3:15
    
@borodin is correct, my OP isn't "wrong". It is simply a contrived example to illustrate a behavior I wanted to understand. I got a good explanation, now I understand. –  Elroy Flynn Jan 14 '12 at 4:27
    
@ElroyFlynn if you want I can simulate the regex engine in the works with your original expression –  fge Jan 14 '12 at 19:04

Because once the first 'test' is found at the beginning of the string (with /(.*?)/ matching an empty string) the next search starts after that string. Straight away the /^/ cannot match, so no more replacements are made.

The regex engine doesn't find all ways that a pattern could possibly match: it claims the first match that it comes across and moves on.

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"The regex engine doesn't find all ways that a pattern could possibly match: it claims the first match that it comes across and moves on." <-- wrong with POSIX regex engines. A POSIX regex engine will always attempt to find the longest, leftmost match (star|starlight will match starlight if given I love starlights as an input` –  fge Jan 14 '12 at 3:57
    
My meaning was that no regex engine finds all ways the pattern could match. So /^.*?/ can't match twice with two different lengths. –  Borodin Jan 14 '12 at 16:56

This is because .*? matches as less as possible including the empty string. So you are matching only the first "test" and replacing it.

The main reason is because your anchor ^. That means your regex matching only once from the start, after the replacement the regex would continue after the replacement but at this point the anchor is not true, so your regex is done.

From your comment

BUT! WHY DOESN'T this replace both: [regex]::replace("testntest",'^(.*?)test', 'barf')(The "testntest" has a newline in the middle so the second instance should match the ^

The anchor ^ matches only the start of the string per default, if you use the modifier m (Multiline), then the anchor ^ will match the start of the row

If you want to replace all occurrences of "test" then match only "test", without ^.*?

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I know what ? means but I'm looking for a deeper explanation of why this fails. After all ,replace is documented as "replace ALL occurrences that match the pattern. This pattern specifies 0 or more of anything followed by 'test'. After the first replace I have 'barf test' so why doesn't that match for a second occurrence? After all, if I run the same replace against the results of the first replace, 'barf test' becomes 'barf barf'. –  Elroy Flynn Jan 13 '12 at 23:16
    
That because your anchor ^. That means your regex matching only once from the start, after the replacement the regex would continue after the replacement but at this point the anchor is not true, so your regex is done. –  stema Jan 13 '12 at 23:25
    
Ok, I get it. thanks. –  Elroy Flynn Jan 13 '12 at 23:27
    
Are you sure? I would expect a second replacement to result in just 'barf' as the pattern matches the entire string. I don't have a VS to hand to test it. –  Borodin Jan 13 '12 at 23:30
    
This answer is incorrect. The problem is not with the /(.*?/ as the effect is the same with or without it. Removing the anchor /^/, on the other hand, makes all the difference. –  Borodin Jan 13 '12 at 23:49

The question mark is the lazy operator. It tries to quit as soon as it can. Remove it and thy will be done.

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This is just wrong. Removing the question mark has the effect of replacing the entire string instead. –  Borodin Jan 14 '12 at 17:33
    
Isn't that what he wants? What else could happen? –  Malvolio Jan 15 '12 at 18:16
    
It was an experiment, and I think he expected every occurrence of 'test' to be replaced with 'barf'. /^(.*)test/ simply replaces the entire string with 'barf'. –  Borodin Jan 16 '12 at 4:58

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