Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the paypal_adaptive gem with Rails 3.1 to make chained payments. However, after watching http://railscasts.com/episodes/143-paypal-security I've become concerned that I should perhaps add security measures to my payment request. Specifically, I don't want someone to be able to manipulate the prices of the items which I send in my request. Of course, I'm using the standard paypal_adaptive gem request:

pay_request = PaypalAdaptive::Request.new

data = {
"returnUrl" => "http://testserver.com/payments/completed_payment_request", 
"requestEnvelope" => {"errorLanguage" => "en_US"},
"currencyCode"=>"USD",  
"receiverList"=>{"receiver"=>[{"email"=>"testpp_1261697850_per@nextsprocket.com",     "amount"=>"10.00"}]},
"cancelUrl"=>"http://testserver.com/payments/canceled_payment_request",
"actionType"=>"PAY",
"ipnNotificationUrl"=>"http://testserver.com/payments/ipn_notification"
}

pay_response = pay_request.pay(data)

if pay_response.success?
  redirect_to pay_response.approve_paypal_payment_url
else
  puts pay_response.errors.first['message']
  redirect_to failed_payment_url
end

My question is: do I need to encrypt this request to prevent people from changing prices like Ryan does in his rails cast? If so, how can I manipulate this code in order to do so?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

IPN validation is definitely good practice. But with regards to encrypting the variables sent across; no, that's not necessary.

The example listed on http://railscasts.com/episodes/143-paypal-security uses Website Payments Standard, in which case it is good to encrypt it.

But Adaptive Payments is a series of server-to-server API calls (the 'Pay' API), from your server to PayPal's. The only part exposed to the buyer is the payKey, a temporary token which the buyer can't manipulate.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, Robert! I'll accept this as an answer. One question though, somewhat unrelated: I've been using these API calls to access accounts in the sandbox -- do you know if I need Website Payments Pro in order to make these API calls in production? I've been trying to find the answer to this question for forever, and you seem to be knowledgeable about Paypal so I thought I'd ask. –  varatis Jan 14 '12 at 3:37
3  
No, you don't need Website Payments Pro; Website Payments Pro is required if you want to use the DoDirectPayment API call. For Adaptive Payments, you'll need to submit an application via x.com , after which you'll get an application ID back. You'll need to ensure you're passing this application ID along in the HTTP header (something you're likely already doing, now in Sandbox). –  Robert Jan 14 '12 at 20:26
2  
I don't use Adaptive Payments myself (I don't need chained/split payments, thus I have no need for it), but you can log a ticket with PayPal at paypal.com/dts to get the exact steps you need to follow to get an application live. –  Robert Jan 14 '12 at 20:27
    
Thanks. Very helpful comments. –  varatis Jan 14 '12 at 20:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.