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The following example does not work because when parent is called in class A, php looks for the parent class of class A but it doesn't exist. I would rather this line to call Test() in class B.

Is this possible?

(I know this seems like a stupid example but it has a practical application)

abstract class A {
    function CallParentTest()
    {
        return call_parent_method('Test');
    }
}

abstract class B extends A {
    function Test()
    {
        return 'test passed';
    }
}

class C extends B {
    function Test()
    {
        return $this->CallParentTest();
    }
}

$object = new C();
echo $object->Test();

Thanks!

EDIT
I changed the parent keyword to the made up method call_parent_method because I think that may have been confusing people. I know there is no way to do this using the keyword.

Just as David Harkness pointed out, I am trying to implement the Template Method pattern but instead of using two different method names, I'm using one. B::Test() will be the default method unless substituted with alternate functionality.

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1  
Is there a real need to redeclare Test function in class C? Because if you do not redeclare Test in C, it will do just what you ask for - call the Test from class B. –  Lubor Bílek Jan 14 '12 at 0:12
    
Yeah, it needs to be set up this way. Like I said, it looks stupid but this is the dumbed down version. –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 0:23
    
You could achieve it by doing some serious backflips in every child class that overrides the parent method by grabbing the stacktrace to determine whether A is the caller or not. If it is, do your thing. If not, call the parent method. This will be far more complicated than just having two methods, though, and I recommend against it. –  David Harkness Jan 14 '12 at 0:54
    
@DavidHarkness, can you expand on that? I know how to do a backtrace to get the method and class called, I just don't know how to call B::Test() without having C::Test() called. In the end, if I have one complicated method doing this work, it's a lot less complicated than having almost every method in every class duplicated. –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 0:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use reflection to bypass the natural calling order for overridden methods. In any context simply create a ReflectionMethod for the method you'd like to call and invoke it. You don't need to do this from the class itself, but you will need to call setAccessible(true) if the method isn't public.

class A {
    public function bypassOverride() {
        echo "Hi from A\n";
        $r = new ReflectionMethod('B', 'override');
        $r->invoke($this);
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public function override() {
        echo "Hi from B\n";
    }
}

class C extends B {
    public function override() {
        echo "Hi from C\n";
        $this->bypassOverride();
    }
}

$c = new C;
$c->override();

The output from this is

Hi from C
Hi from A
Hi from B

You could make bypassOverride() more generic and move it to a helper class if you need to do this a lot.

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Thanks, I see what you're saying now and it's an interesting approach but this again puts the call to the parent method in class C and will result in a considerable amount of duplicated code. –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 17:05
    
I found an easier solution using reflection. –  David Harkness Jan 14 '12 at 23:41
    
Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 23:56

Is this possible?

No.

It makes no sense to use the parent keyword except in child classes. It's only purpose is to be used by child classes to call methods that it as overridden. Think about multi-level parent calls where a child calls its parent's method of the same name and, in turn, that parent calls its parent's method of the same name.

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Thanks, I'm well aware of how inheritance normally works, what I'm attempting to do is slightly outside of the norm. PHP has many dynamic ways of calling methods and such, I was wondering if there is a way to accomplish this. –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 0:27

webbiedave is correct regarding parent, but it looks like you're trying to implement the Template Method pattern where the abstract base class calls a method that subclasses are expected to implement. Here's an example that demonstrates a horrible way to handle errors in your applications.

abstract class ExceptionIgnorer {
    public function doIt() {
        try {
            $this->actuallyDoIt();
        }
        catch (Exception $e) {
            // ignore the problem and it might go away...
        }
    }

    public abstract function actuallyDoit();
}

class ErrorThrower extends ExceptionIgnorer {
    public function actuallyDoIt() {
        throw new RuntimeException("This will be ignored");
    }
}

$thrower = new ErrorThrower;
$thrower->doIt(); // no problem

Here doIt() is the template method as it defines the overall algorithm to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I am, I was trying to see if there was a way to accomplish this in PHP without having to have two different method names. I'm planning to implement the template method pattern in many many places throughout a large application so using the same name would make development much easier. –  Godwin Jan 14 '12 at 0:33

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