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Long version...

A co-worker asserted today after seeing my use of while (1) in a Perl script that for (;;) is faster. I argued that they should be the same hoping that the interpreter would optimize out any differences. I set up a script that would run 1,000,000,000 for loop iterations and the same number of while loops and record the time between. I could find no appreciable difference. My co-worker said that a professor had told him that the while (1) was doing a comparison 1 == 1 and the for (;;) was not. We repeated the same test with the 100x the number of iterations with C++ and the difference was negligible. It was however a graphic example of how much faster compiled code can be vs. a scripting language.

Short version...

Is there any reason to prefer a while (1) over a for (;;) if you need an infinite loop to break out of?

Note: If it's not clear from the question. This was purely a fun academic discussion between a couple of friends. I am aware this is not a super important concept that all programmers should agonize over. Thanks for all the great answers I (and I'm sure others) have learned a few things from this discussion.

Update: The aforementioned co-worker weighed in with a response below.

Quoted here in case it gets buried.

It came from an AMD assembly programmer. He stated that C programmers (the poeple) don't realize that their code has inefficiencies. He said today though, gcc compilers are very good, and put people like him out of business. He said for example, and told me about the while 1 vs for(;;). I use it now out of habit but gcc and especially interpreters will do the same operation (a processor jump) for both these days, since they are optimized.

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4  
I'm curious. Why do need an infinite loop in a perl script ? You're obviously not programming a driver or a system thing... Infinite is quiet long :-) –  Luc M May 20 '09 at 2:49
81  
Which infinite loop is fastest? LOL... "My new computer is so fast, it runs an infinite loop in just under an hour..." ;-) –  Arjan Einbu May 20 '09 at 11:03
8  
Was that a professor of sociology who told him that? In the modern era, the code you type isn't what the computer ends up seeing. –  brian d foy May 26 '09 at 15:46
4  
i expect the amount of time it took you to test this was far longer than the amount of time potentially saved by knowing which one is faster, if either. even if you amortize it over both your lifetimes of programming. –  Peter Recore Sep 28 '10 at 16:38
3  
Why would the compiler ever generate code to perform a test that it knows has no side effects and whose result the compiler already knows? That makes no sense. –  David Schwartz Aug 27 '11 at 21:14

19 Answers 19

up vote 180 down vote accepted

In perl, they result in the same opcodes:

$ perl -MO=Concise -e 'for(;;) { print "foo\n" }'
a  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v ->3
9     <2> leaveloop vK/2 ->a
3        <{> enterloop(next->8 last->9 redo->4) v ->4
-        <@> lineseq vK ->9
4           <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v ->5
7           <@> print vK ->8
5              <0> pushmark s ->6
6              <$> const[PV "foo\n"] s ->7
8           <0> unstack v ->4
-e syntax OK

$ perl -MO=Concise -e 'while(1) { print "foo\n" }'
a  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC ->(end)
1     <0> enter ->2
2     <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v ->3
9     <2> leaveloop vK/2 ->a
3        <{> enterloop(next->8 last->9 redo->4) v ->4
-        <@> lineseq vK ->9
4           <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v ->5
7           <@> print vK ->8
5              <0> pushmark s ->6
6              <$> const[PV "foo\n"] s ->7
8           <0> unstack v ->4
-e syntax OK

Likewise in GCC:

#include <stdio.h>

void t_while() {
    while(1)
    	printf("foo\n");
}

void t_for() {
    for(;;)
    	printf("foo\n");
}

    .file   "test.c"
    .section    .rodata
.LC0:
    .string "foo"
    .text
.globl t_while
    .type   t_while, @function
t_while:
.LFB2:
    pushq   %rbp
.LCFI0:
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
.LCFI1:
.L2:
    movl    $.LC0, %edi
    call    puts
    jmp .L2
.LFE2:
    .size   t_while, .-t_while
.globl t_for
    .type   t_for, @function
t_for:
.LFB3:
    pushq   %rbp
.LCFI2:
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
.LCFI3:
.L5:
    movl    $.LC0, %edi
    call    puts
    jmp .L5
.LFE3:
    .size   t_for, .-t_for
    .section    .eh_frame,"a",@progbits
.Lframe1:
    .long   .LECIE1-.LSCIE1
.LSCIE1:
    .long   0x0
    .byte   0x1
    .string "zR"
    .uleb128 0x1
    .sleb128 -8
    .byte   0x10
    .uleb128 0x1
    .byte   0x3
    .byte   0xc
    .uleb128 0x7
    .uleb128 0x8
    .byte   0x90
    .uleb128 0x1
    .align 8
.LECIE1:
.LSFDE1:
    .long   .LEFDE1-.LASFDE1
.LASFDE1:
    .long   .LASFDE1-.Lframe1
    .long   .LFB2
    .long   .LFE2-.LFB2
    .uleb128 0x0
    .byte   0x4
    .long   .LCFI0-.LFB2
    .byte   0xe
    .uleb128 0x10
    .byte   0x86
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .long   .LCFI1-.LCFI0
    .byte   0xd
    .uleb128 0x6
    .align 8
.LEFDE1:
.LSFDE3:
    .long   .LEFDE3-.LASFDE3
.LASFDE3:
    .long   .LASFDE3-.Lframe1
    .long   .LFB3
    .long   .LFE3-.LFB3
    .uleb128 0x0
    .byte   0x4
    .long   .LCFI2-.LFB3
    .byte   0xe
    .uleb128 0x10
    .byte   0x86
    .uleb128 0x2
    .byte   0x4
    .long   .LCFI3-.LCFI2
    .byte   0xd
    .uleb128 0x6
    .align 8
.LEFDE3:
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.3.3-5ubuntu4) 4.3.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

So I guess the answer is, they're the same in many compilers. Of course, for some other compilers this may not necessarily be the case, but chances are the code inside of the loop is going to be a few thousand times more expensive than the loop itself anyway, so who cares?

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10  
++ That's a fun perl switch. –  guns May 20 '09 at 4:55
12  
try with B::Deparse, deparsing an infinite for loop returns a while loop :P –  Kent Fredric May 20 '09 at 21:09
14  
"In perl, they result in the same opcodes"... yes, but which is faster? :-) –  the Tin Man Apr 18 '10 at 5:54
4  
+1 so you're closer to the Great Answer Badge. Because it is one :) –  Marko Oct 3 '10 at 20:14
3  
I love that gcc substituted puts() for printf(), since there is only one argument and therefore nothing to format -- faster and more secure! (gcc also checks formatting tags against the variable argument list.) –  Lee D May 26 '11 at 11:06

Using GCC, they both seem to compile to the same assembly language:

L2:
        jmp     L2
share|improve this answer
    
How do you get this assembly code? –  Frank Sep 28 '10 at 16:52
7  
Using GCC with the -S option (assemble, do not link) –  Martin Cote Sep 29 '10 at 3:37

There's not much reason to prefer one over the other. I do think that while(1) and particularly while(true) are more readable than for(;;), but that's just my preference.

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62  
#define EVER ;; for(EVER) I've always find that kind of amusing. –  Tom May 20 '09 at 2:47
15  
How about #define ever (;;) forever; –  Martin Cote May 20 '09 at 2:55
12  
Both seem more readable on the surface, but I try not to define new keywords for my maintenance programmer (usually me) to scratch his head over. –  Bill the Lizard May 20 '09 at 3:01
10  
@Martin that will not work, because #define's do not replace within a token, and forever is it's own token. –  Istvan Chung Aug 17 '10 at 19:42
1  
I think that PC-Lint warns for while(true), and does not for for(;;). –  Gauthier Nov 28 '12 at 14:25

There is no difference according to the standard. 6.5.3/1 has:

The for statement

for ( for-init-statement conditionopt ; expressionopt ) statement

is equivalent to

{
  for-init-statement
  while ( condition ) {
    statement
    expression ;
  }
}

And 6.5.3/2 has:

Either or both of the condition and the expression can be omitted. A missing condition makes the implied while clause equivalent to while(true).

So according to the C++ standard the code:

for (;;);

is exactly the same as:

{
  while (true) {
    ;
    ;
  }
}
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1  
+1 Good answer. –  GManNickG May 24 '09 at 21:20
4  
That doesn't pertain to the generated code or performance at all. The standard only defines functionality. Of course, performance will be the same. –  Potatoswatter Aug 13 '09 at 23:38
1  
I don't believe it's true that a difference in performance violates the as-if rule. If it were, then compilers would not be permitted to speed up your code under the as-if rule, for example by re-ordering independent statements. Compilers in fact do exactly that. But my copy of the standard is way upstairs. –  Steve Jessop Sep 4 '09 at 14:07
    
Very good answer. –  Copas Sep 24 '10 at 20:55
1  
Thanks to those highlighting that the as-if rule is not direct evidence of functionality, I've removed my comment. –  Richard Corden Mar 14 '11 at 20:08

The Visual C++ compiler used to emit a warning for

while (1) 

(constant expression) but not for

for (;;)

I've continued the practice of preferring for (;;) for that reason, but I don't know if the compiler still does that these days.

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Thanks! That's the fist good reason for my friends missunderstanding I've heard. –  Copas May 20 '09 at 5:19
    
the warning is probably becuase you used while(1) instead of while(true) –  jrharshath May 20 '09 at 6:12
14  
true is a constant. while (true) is a constant expression. For anyone interested, warning C4127 is documented here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6t66728h(VS.80).aspx –  sean e May 20 '09 at 6:34

for(;;) is one less character to type if you want to go in that direction to optimize things.

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13  
Good to know for golfing. Otherwise a poor reason to choose a syntax. –  Adam Bellaire Feb 2 '10 at 13:51
    
@AdamBellaire Terseness often increases readability, above a certain skill threshold. –  Vector Gorgoth Nov 27 '13 at 20:57

For all the people arguing you shouldn't use indefinte while loops, and suggesting daft stuff like using open goto's ( seriously, ouch )

while (1) {
     last if( condition1 );
     code();
     more_code(); 
     last if( condition2 ); 
     even_more_code(); 
}

Can't really be represented effectively any other way. Not without creating an exit variable and doing black magic to keep it synced.

If you have a penchant for the more goto-esque syntax, use something sane that limits scope.

flow: { 

   if ( condition ){ 
      redo flow;
   }
   if ( othercondition ){ 
       redo flow;
   }
   if ( earlyexit ){ 
       last flow;
   }
   something(); # doesn't execute when earlyexit is true 
}

Ultimately Speed is not that important

Worring about how effective speed wise different looping constructs are is a massive waste of time. Premature optimization through and through. I can't think of any situation I've ever seen where profiling code found bottlenecks in my choice of looping construct.

Generally its the how of the loop and the what of the loop.

You should "optimize" for readability and succinctness, and write whatever is best at explaining the problem to the next poor sucker who finds your code.

If you use the "goto LABEL" trick somebody mentioned, and I have to use your code, be prepared to sleep with one eye open, especially if you do it more than once, because that sort of stuff creates horrifically spaghetti code.

Just because you can create spaghetti code doesn't mean you should

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Turbo C with this old compilers for(;;) results in faster code then while(1).

Today gcc, Visual C (I think almost all) compilers optimize well, and CPUs with 4.7 MHz are rarely used.

In those days a for( i=10; i; i-- ) was faster than for( i=1; i <=10; i++ ), because compare i is 0, results in a CPU-Zero-Flag conditional Jump. And the Zero-Flag was modified with the last decrement operation ( i-- ), no extra cmp-operation is needed.

    call    __printf_chk
    decl    %ebx          %ebx=iterator i 
    jnz     .L2
    movl    -4(%ebp), %ebx
    leave

and here with for(i=1; i<=10; i++) with extra cmpl:

    call    __printf_chk
    incl    %ebx
    cmpl    $11, %ebx
    jne     .L2
    movl    -4(%ebp), %ebx
    leave
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2  
I can't believe that after two years this iniquitous question is still getting thoughtful, high quality responses. Thanks. –  Copas Apr 24 '12 at 11:03

I heard about this once.

It came from an AMD assembly programmer. He stated that C programmers (the people) don't realize that their code has inefficiencies. He said today though, gcc compilers are very good, and put people like him out of business. He said for example, and told me about the while 1 vs for(;;). I use it now out of habit but gcc and especially interpreters will do the same operation (a processor jump) for both these days, since they are optimized.

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In an optimized build of a compiled language, there should be no appreciable difference between the two. Neither should end up performing any comparisons at runtime, they will just execute the loop code until you manually exit the loop (e.g. with a break).

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From Stroustrup, TC++PL (3rd edition), §6.1.1:

The curious notation for (;;) is the standard way to specify an infinite loop; you could pronounce it "forever". [...] while (true) is an alternative.

I prefer for (;;).

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If compiler doesn't do any optimization, for(;;) would always be faster than while(true). This is because while-statement evaluates the condition everytime, but for-statement is an unconditional jump. But if compiler optimizes the control flow, it may generate some opcodes. You can read disassembly code very easily.

P.S. you could write a infinite loop like this:

#define EVER ;;
  //...
  for (EVER) {
    //...
  }
share|improve this answer

I hope this question is only "academic".

In my experience, software of any reasonable size is, as first written, riddled with avoidable function calls, causing large factors of slowdown.

I still hear people in all seriousness asking questions like this, which is like a drunk looking for his keys under the light of a pencil-beam "because that's where the light is".

share|improve this answer
    
This question just came from a chat at work. That's all, a co-worker had an (apparently bad) professor give him the idea that somehow for (;;) was better then while (1). I didn't buy it but wanted to prove it to him buy asking some smart people (you guys) to demonstrate it better then I had with the test code I generated. So yes purely "academic". –  Copas May 24 '09 at 23:35
1  
@Copas: Please forgive my negativity. And as for professors, I was one, and I think there is a systemic problem in higher ed that there is precious little quality control on what professors tell students. –  Mike Dunlavey May 25 '09 at 0:56
    
@Mike Agreed, thanks for your contribution. I don't take offence to it being considered a bad question. By all rights it very well may be a bad question. But it is a real question that came up in everyday work. That appears to have spurred on some real thought provoking discourse. –  Copas May 29 '09 at 2:15
1  
@Copas:Having been a prof, and being dumb enough to worry about cosmic issues, I have the impression that the whole "world-view" of software performance is too focussed on low-level issues, and considers too little the wide wonderful world of ways to make software slow, like too much abstraction, too much data structure, too much reliance on notification-style architecture, and ignorance of things like code generation. Sorry for the tirade. –  Mike Dunlavey May 29 '09 at 11:33
    
... nobody in their right mind would casually write an extra level of nested loop if they didn't have to, but they think nothing of invoking another layer of "abstraction", the wonderfulness of which will surely guarantee getting the program counter back in the forseeable future. –  Mike Dunlavey Jun 21 '09 at 22:17

In theory, a completely naive compiler could store the literal '1' in the binary (wasting space) and check to see if 1 == 0 every iteration (wasting time and more space).

In reality, however, even with "no" optimizations, compilers will still reduce both to the same. They may also emit warnings because it could indicate a logical error. For instance, the argument of while could be defined somewhere else and you not realize it's constant.

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while(1) is an idiom for for(;;) which is recognized by most compilers.

I was glad to see that perl recognizes until(0), too.

share|improve this answer
    
In what situation would until(0) be helpful? –  Copas May 30 '09 at 18:04
3  
until() is the opposite of while() just as unless() is the opposite of if(). As suggested eslewhere in this thread, one might write: do { something... } while (! condition) An alternative might be until (condition) { something } –  JayDee Jun 1 '09 at 13:36

I'm surprised no one has offered the more direct form, corresponding to the desired assembly:

forever:
     do stuff;
     goto forever;
share|improve this answer
    
Dose that not end up with the same machine code as while 1 or for (;;) in say c? –  Copas Aug 19 '10 at 20:21

I am surprised that nobody properly tested for (;;) versus while (1) in perl!

Because perl is interpreted language, the time to run a perl script does not only consist of the execution phase (which in this case is the same) but also of the interpretation phase before execution. Both of these phases have to be taken in account when making a speed comparison.

Luckily perl has a convenient Benchmark module which we can use to implement a benchmark such as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

sub t_for   { eval 'die; for (;;) { }'; }
sub t_for2  { eval 'die; for (;;)  { }'; }
sub t_while { eval 'die; while (1) { }'; }

cmpthese(-60, { for => \&t_for, for2 => \&t_for2, while => \&t_while });

Note that I am testing two different versions of the infinite for loop: one which is shorter than the while loop and another one which has an extra space to make it the same length as the while loop.

On Ubuntu 11.04 x86_64 with perl 5.10.1 I get the following results:

          Rate   for  for2 while
for   100588/s    --   -0%   -2%
for2  100937/s    0%    --   -1%
while 102147/s    2%    1%    --

The while loop is clearly the winner on this platform.

On FreeBSD 8.2 x86_64 with perl 5.14.1:

         Rate   for  for2 while
for   53453/s    --   -0%   -2%
for2  53552/s    0%    --   -2%
while 54564/s    2%    2%    --

While loop is the winner here too.

On FreeBSD 8.2 i386 with perl 5.14.1:

         Rate while   for  for2
while 24311/s    --   -1%   -1%
for   24481/s    1%    --   -1%
for2  24637/s    1%    1%    --

Surprisingly the for loop with an extra space is the fastest choice here!

My conclusion is that the while loop should be used on x86_64 platform if the programmer is optimizing for speed. Obviously a for loop should be used when optimizing for space. My results are unfortunately inconclusive regarding other platforms.

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2  
The conclusion is blatantly wrong. Benchmark has its limitations and cannot be used to distinguish fast from slow if the results are within 7% of each other. Moreover, you have not tested the difference between the for and while loops because each sub will die before reaching the loops themselves. And since when did the amount of whitespace matter to the Perl interpreter? Sorry, but the analysis is extremely flawed. –  Zaid Dec 11 '11 at 20:25
2  
@Zaid, Thanks for your comments! Would you mind posting your own answer so that everyone can learn from that? :) The die is there in my code because my intention is to test only the compilation time difference. As others have already pointed out the resulting byte-code is identical, thus there is no point in testing that. Surprisingly the amount of white space seems to make a small difference in this case in my testing environments. It might have something to do with how the characters end up getting aligned in memory or something similar... –  snap Dec 26 '11 at 7:09
4  
I don't need to post an answer because what I would say has already been mentioned by bdonlan. And even if you're comparing compile times, the numbers that Benchmark are inconclusive. Don't trust that 1% difference at all! –  Zaid Dec 26 '11 at 19:19
    
Only 60 iterations? Run tests for like 5 minutes so as to get more accurate relative times. –  Mooing Duck Oct 16 '12 at 16:44
    
-60 runs the test for 60 seconds. –  snap Oct 17 '12 at 4:43

I would think that both are the same in terms of performance. But I would prefer while(1) for readability but I question why you need an infinite loop.

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They are the same. There are much more important questions to ponder.

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16  
No links or explanation. Unhelpful, subjective and a little condescending. –  cdmckay May 20 '09 at 2:41
1  
well no proof but he is right. They both call the Opcode for jumping when false. (which would make it the same as goto but no one likes gotos) –  Matthew Whited May 20 '09 at 2:44
3  
I was unaware that only important questions where to be asked, my mistake was my first question. –  Copas May 20 '09 at 2:50
3  
Yes, I admit it is condescending. But seriously, even without any proof it is obvious that they are going to be in the same ballpark speedwise; if the question was about style there would be something to argue about. I was trying to make the point that on the list of things to worry about, this should really be at the bottom of the list. –  Mark Ransom May 20 '09 at 4:22
6  
I wasn't trying to be a jerk. I was trying to make a point. When I posted it I was trying for a kind of dark humor, and it is obvious that I failed; for that I apologize. –  Mark Ransom May 29 '09 at 2:44

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