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Is there a difference between (in either java or c#):

public class Foo {
  Bar1 bar1;
  Bar2 bar2;

  public Foo(Bar1 bar1, Bar2 bar2) {
    this.bar1 = bar1;
    this.bar2 = bar2;
  }
}

And

public class Foo {
  Bar1 bar1 = null;
  Bar2 bar2 = null;

  public Foo(Bar1 bar1, Bar2 bar2) {
    this.bar1 = bar1;
    this.bar2 = bar2;
  }
}

For objects, it shouldn't matter whether you assign null or not - it's implicit, right?

My boss is insistent on assigning each value null. For strings, I understand assigning String str = "", since there's a big difference there, but I'm not quite sure why the huge deal over objects.

Also, is it bad practice to do the following:

public class Foo {
  Bar1 bar1 = new Bar1();
  Bar2 bar2 = new Bar2(); 

  public Foo(Bar1 bar1, Bar2 bar2) {
    this.bar1 = bar1;
    this.bar2 = bar2;
  }
}
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1  
Uuughh I feel so bad for people when they say their boss insists on this or that programming detail that makes no difference. A development manager who moonlights as a junior programmer and debates useless semantics. Don't put up with it, sisters and brothers. –  Rex M Jan 14 '12 at 2:45
    
Actually, I don't understand assigning str = "" unless there's a good reason why it should be the empty string. At least if you missed changing it from null the bug would likely be found faster. Either a string should be empty or it shouldn't, throwing = "" around randomly is just sabotage. –  Jon Hanna Jan 14 '12 at 3:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no need to explicitly initialize instance variables to default values. In Java and C#, instance variables are assigned default values when the instance is created. A reference type already is null prior to the main body of the constructor running. An int already is 0, etc. In the first code snippet, bar1 and bar2 are already null. There's no need to explicitly state it, as in the second snippet.

In the second example (third snippet), there is absolutely no need to instantiate an instance variable to a new Bar1(); if all you are doing is overwriting with another reference in the constructor.

You might want to initialize a member variable to a value when the default should be something other than the type's default when a constructor is not already immediately overwriting it with a supplied parameter. But setting it to its default value is simply redundant. However, if it helps your boss or other members of the team understand what those default values are, then so be it.

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Does this change if you have multiple constructors, or not all values are assigned immediately from the constructor? –  Doctor Oreo Jan 14 '12 at 2:36
    
I've expanded the answer (and eliminated the wording about a single constructor) to hopefully make it clearer. Instance members are always initialized to default values, you do not have to explicitly do it. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 14 '12 at 2:43

If you're going to assign a class field in the constructor, there's generally not a good reason to do any assignment in the field declaration. (If your constructor doesn't assign the field, though, it's a different story.)

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Since it's already suggested that there is no difference between 1 and 2. Just providing a case where explicitly assigning a 'null' value is required.

Consider,

public class Foo
    {
        ....
         public void DoSomething()
    {
        string someValue;

        if (someValue == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("SomeValue must not be null");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine(someValue);
        }
    }
    }

What do you expect to be the output of DoSomething? It's a compile time error: 'Use of unassigned local variable 'somValue'.

Thus, in this case it is mandatory and hence makes sense to have someValue = null. But, for a member field it does not because object constructor assigns default values (default(T)) to all member fields.

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Between the first two the only difference is that to former is clearer in intent.

While I know that bar1 and bar2 will be initialised to null (conceptually at least, hopefuly it gets optimised away in both cases), it's clear that the intent is that they not be null but rather set to the values they are given in the constructor.

In the second case though, the intent isn't clear. The developer explicitly set them to null, so presumably the developer wants them to be null for some good reason. Then the developer sets them to something else in the only visible code-path. When I see code for which I can't understand the intent, there are four possibilities.

  1. The developer is an idiot.
  2. The code went through some changes, and while once the explicit setting to null was necessary, it no longer is, and this is just a legacy of earlier code.
  3. The develop made a mistake.
  4. I'm not spotting something.

I can rule out number 1, becaues I don't work with idiots. If I was to find myself working with idiots, I'd polish up my CV.

I'm left with the other three. I'm not arrogant so I don't rule out 4 until I'm sure. If I can't quickly ask the developer in question, then I'm going to waste some time making sure that 4 isn't the case. If I can ask the developer, I'm possibly going to waste some of my time, and theirs. Still, it's not really a waste because of 2, 3 and 4, either way I need to know which is the case because it's only then that I can be sure I understand the code and that there isn't a bug related to the initialisation.

The third case is much worse. Assuming all goes well, then the only real effect is that perhaps the compiler or the jitter won't optimise away the deliberately inserted cruft, which would have a very slight performance impact. But, since all never goes well, maybe you've just made a bug harder to find.

Edit:

This assumes that there's no side effect to object creation. If there is, then the third case could be anything from considerably wasteful to downright dangerous.

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