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The basic idea is that I have a "family" of classes that all do the same identical thing, but in a slightly different way. This "family" is used in a "high performance" loop, so speed is of the essence. Further, the specific family is specified by a configuration file...

The problem is that there is tremendous code repetition in the main function here. Is there a better way to structure this so I don't have to write HP<objx> test and test.loop(bobloblaw) three times? (In practice, this chunk of code is many more lines than 2...)

class obj1 {
public:
    double f(double x) const { return 1.; }
};

class obj2 {
public:
    double f(double x) const { return x; }
};

class obj3 {
public:
    double f(double x) const { return x*x; }
};

template <class O>
class HP {
private:
    O obj;

public:

    double loop(const vector<double>& x) {
        double s = 0.;
        for (auto i : x) s += obj.f(i);

    return s;
    }
};

int main() {
    string config = "bob";
    double result = 0;
    vector<double> bobloblaw;

    /* Read configuration file to determine which object to use. */
    if (config == "obj1") {
        HP<obj1> test;
        result = test.loop(bobloblaw);
    } else if (config == "obj2") {
        HP<obj2> test;
        result = test.loop(bobloblaw);
    } else if (config == "obj3") {
        HP<obj3> test;
        result = test.loop(bobloblaw);
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
+1 for bobloblaw –  jeremynealbrown Jan 14 '12 at 2:52
    
+1 for Arrested Development reference. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 14 '12 at 2:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following is untested, but should work:

class obj1
{
public:
  double f(double x) const { return 1.; }
};

class obj2
{
public:
  double f(double x) const { return x; }
};

class obj3
{
public:
  double f(double x) const { return x*x; }
};

class HPbase
{
public:
  virtual double loop(const vector<double>&) = 0;
};

template <class O> class HP:
  public HPbase
{
public:
  double loop(const vector<double>& x)
  {
    double s = 0.;
    for (auto i : x)
      s += obj.f(i);
    return s;
  }
private:
  O obj;
};

std::unordered_map<std::string, std::unique_ptr<HPbase>> decode{
  {"obj1"}, new HP<obj1>()},
  {"obj2"}, new HP<obj2>()},
  {"obj3"}, new HP<obj3>()} };

int main()
{
  string config = "bob";
  double result = 0;
  vector<double> bobloblaw;

  /* Read configuration file to determine which object to use. */
  result = decode[config].loop(bobloblaw);
}

Note that the only addition is a base class for HP<> and a map which replaces the if/else logic of your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks--this is perfect and exactly the type of answer I was hoping to get. –  notrick Jan 14 '12 at 3:15
    
why unordered_map? Isn't it better/faster to use a std::map here? –  David Feurle Jan 14 '12 at 3:33
    
@DavidFeurle: Well, in this case, it probably doesn't matter at all because there's just one lookup. However, generally std::map lookup is O(log n), wile std::unordered_map lookup is O(1). So if you have enough entries, unordered_map lookup will be faster. For few entries, I have no idea which one is faster (it might even depend on the implementation), but then, it's unlikely to be a bottleneck anyway. However, for few entries, std::map is probably more memory efficient. –  celtschk Jan 14 '12 at 9:40

Couldn't you have these 3 classes all be subclasses w/ the same parent? main would still need to assign to test using the right subclass, but test itself would be declared to be the common superclass.

The downside here is that there may be a (probably small) performance hit, as the compiler would not know when producing the code for test.loop which version would be used, and thus would have to decide at runtime.

An alternative, which would get around this, would be to write the common code as a macro, which thus would only be written once but expanded into 3 distinct copies, each of which the compiler could optimize based on the variant of test being used. Can make debugging a bitch, but if your focus is on performance & reducing redundancy of source (and not so much for object), that might be a good trade-off.

share|improve this answer
    
The decision depends on user input, so it will always be done at runtime. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 14 '12 at 2:51
    
Which one will get USED is determined at runtime; but the code to be executed for each version gets generated at compile-time, so if there is a distinct version of the code for each type of subclass, the compiler can better optimize each version. –  Scott Hunter Jan 14 '12 at 2:58
    
+1 for the suggestion to use a macro, which despite their dangers do have valid uses. –  John Bartholomew Jan 14 '12 at 3:02
2  
I would however note that your suggestion that the performance hit of a virtual function call (per iteration) is "probably small" is unfounded -- predicting performance is hard enough with the code, without seeing the code (or knowing anything about the expected execution environment) you have no basis for even a guess. –  John Bartholomew Jan 14 '12 at 3:06
    
@John Bartholomew: I both agree (in that I'd have no way of telling the relative magnitude of the overhead to the cost of the "guts" of the method) and disagree (I have control over how the overhead is being introduced, and it should amount to a switch between the subtypes, all of which are known by the compiler -- and "probably small" is a pretty weak claim to start with :) ). –  Scott Hunter Jan 14 '12 at 3:19

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