Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file with addresses in which some addresses have the city zip line twice.

Example

Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
TIMBUKTU, AK 99909

I'd like to keep the first, so I thought a sed one-liner such as the following might work:

sed -e '$!N' -e "s/\(.* 9[0-9]\{4\}\)\n.* 9[0-9]\{4\}/\1/" processme.txt

The weird part is: it works on files with no blank lines --- but not ones with.

???

Thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
You can dis-regard my answer since it uses awk. I didn't see the sed only tag. –  jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 3:23
    
Actually, I just need to solve this --- awk is fine. I'm just more familiar with sed. The old 'if all you have is a hammer ...' syndrome. –  Bubnoff Jan 14 '12 at 3:31
    
Sounds good. :) I made one more change to the answer. Can you please test it against your file. –  jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 3:33
    
Your awk statement doesn't work either. –  Bubnoff Jan 14 '12 at 3:35
    
I did a test on a sample file. If you can tell me what the issue is then may be I can work it out. –  jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 3:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In case you still wanted to use sed

Keep 1st occurrence

sed 'N;/9[[:digit:]]\{4\}\n.*9[[:digit:]]\{4\}/{P;d;D};P;D' processme.txt

Keep 2nd occurrence

sed 'N;/9[[:digit:]]\{4\}\n.*9[[:digit:]]\{4\}/D;P;D' processme.txt

Also, the use of [[:digit:]] over [0-9] is preferred as the former works across locales.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he'd like to keep the first address not the last. –  potong Jan 14 '12 at 8:23
    
Yes I'd like to keep the first. –  Bubnoff Jan 15 '12 at 16:37
    
@Bubnoff ok, I updated my answer to accommodate either case. Note that the only reason my first answer kept the 2nd occurrence was because that is what the answer you accepted does. –  SiegeX Jan 15 '12 at 21:19
    
Got it, thanks. I'm going to check this out against my records and see how it goes. –  Bubnoff Jan 16 '12 at 7:15
    
This is a keeper, thanks! –  Bubnoff Jan 18 '12 at 3:03

Updated to include first match instead of second.

awk 'NF{a=$NF; b=$0; getline; if(a~$NF) {print b;next} else {print b; print $0; next}}1' file

Input File:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
TIMBUKTU, AK 99909

Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
TIMBUKTU, AK 99909
Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
TIMBUKTU, AK 99909

Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
TIMBUKTU, AK 99909

Output:

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk 'NF{a=$NF; b=$0; getline; if(a~$NF) {print b;next} else {print b; 

print $0; next}}1' file
Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909

Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909

Joe Schmoe
4545 RANDOM ADDRESS ST NE
TIMBUKTU AK 99909
share|improve this answer
    
But the lines aren't the same, only similar. –  Bubnoff Jan 14 '12 at 3:23
    
I need to match on zip code. Eventually,I'd like to run it in a shell script against an array of zip codes. –  Bubnoff Jan 14 '12 at 3:24
    
Yea, I am only matching the last field which is the zip code as shown in the conditional if (a==$NF). I modified it to if(a~$NF) –  jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 3:26
    
The awk doesn't work either. –  Bubnoff Jan 14 '12 at 3:33
    
Did you try with the latest version? What issue are you getting. I recently updated the answer to include NF. –  jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 3:34

This might work for you:

 sed ':a;$!N;/ \(9[0-9]\{4\}\)\n.*\(9[0-9]\{4\}\)/s/\n.*//;ta;P;D' file

This handles multilple consecutive similar lines. Or this:

sed '/9[0-9]\{4\}/!b;:a;$!{N;/\n\s*$/ba};s/\(9[0-9]\{4\}\)\(\n\s*\)*[^\n]*9[0-9]\{4\}/\1/' file

This handles blank lines between consecutive similar lines.

sed ':a;$!{N;ba};s/\(9[0-9]\{4\}\)\(\n\s*\)*[^\n]*9[0-9]\{4\}/\1/;ta' file

As does this as well as multilple consecutive similar lines but slurps the whole file into pattern space.

share|improve this answer
    
This ones a tough one to decipher but i'll give it a shot. –  Bubnoff Jan 16 '12 at 7:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.