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I'd like to code a function like the following

public void Foo(System.Type t where t : MyClass)
{ ... }

In other words, the argument type is System.Type, and I want to restrict the allowed Types to those that derive from MyClass.

Is there any way to specify this syntactically, or does t have to be checked at runtime?

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Maybe your approach is wrong. The way I look at this, it would be much easier to create an instance method Foo() on MyClass, that way all derived classes can call Foo and you can use this.GetType() to perform the same behavior without an additional sanity check. – Juliet May 20 '09 at 3:23
    
I'm doing this for the reflection functionality -- within the function, I need access the type's properties. – kpozin May 20 '09 at 3:39
up vote 8 down vote accepted

If your method has to take a Type type as it's argument, I don't think there's a way to do this. If you have flexibility with the method call you could do: public void Foo(MyClass myClass) and the get the Type by calling .GetType().

To expand a little. System.Type is the type of the argument, so there's no way to further specify what should be passed. Just as a method that takes an integer between 1 and 10, must take an int and then do runtime checking that the limits were properly adhered to.

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Specifying the type be MyClass, or derived from it, is a value check on the argument itself. It's like saying the hello parameter in

void Foo(int hello) {...}

must be between 10 and 100. It's not possible to check at compile time.

You must use generics or check the type at run time, just like any other parameter value check.

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You can use the following:

public void Foo<T>(T variable) where T : MyClass
{ ... }

The call would be like the following:

{
    ...
    Foo(someInstanceOfMyClass);
    ...
}
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This is not what OP asked. – Sarge Borsch Dec 30 '13 at 10:09

What you want could theoretically be done with attributes. But this is much clearer (imo) and does exactly the same thing:

public void Foo(MyClass m) {
   Type t = m.GetType();
   // ...
}
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Of course that doesn't work if it's null. :) – Colin Burnett May 20 '09 at 3:30

why don't you use

public void foo<t>();

instead?

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You can also use an extension method, which will be available for all objects convertible to MyClass:

public static class MyClassExtensions
{
    public static void Foo(this MyClass obj)
    {
       // ...
    }
}

And you can use it as if it were an ordinary method of an object:

var x = new MyClass();
x.Foo();
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