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In the POSIX API, read() returns 0 to indicate that the end-of-file has been reached. Why isn't there a separate function that tells you that read() would return zero -- without requiring you to actually call read()?


Reason for asking: Since you have to call read() in order to discover that it will fail, this makes file reading algorithms more complicated and maybe slightly less efficient since they have to allocate a target buffer that may not be needed.

What we might like to do...

while ( !eof )
   {
   allocate buffer
   read to buffer
   process buffer
   }

What we have to do instead...

while ( true )
   {
   allocate buffer
   read to buffer
   if ( eof ) release buffer, break;
   process buffer
   }

Additionally, it seems like this behavior propagates itself into higher-level APIs such as fread() and feof() in C -- and creates a lot of confusion about how to use feof() correctly:

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The most interesting answer that I have seen (to a similar question): stackoverflow.com/a/5605161/86967. Need to think about whether or not similar logic is applicable to the POSIX API. –  nobar Nov 20 '14 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

To gain perspective on why this might be the case, understand that end-of-stream is not inherently a permanent situation. A file's read pointer could be at the end, but if more data is subsequently appended by a write operation, then subsequent reads will succeed.

Example: In Linux, when reading from the console, a new line followed by ^D will cause posix::read() to return zero (indicating "end of file"). However, if the program isn't terminated, the program can continue to read (assuming additional lines are typed).

Since end-of-stream is not a permanent situation, perhaps it makes sense to not even have an is_at_end() function (POSIX does not). Unfortunately, this does put some additional burden on the programmer (and/or a wrapper library) to elegantly and efficiently deal with this complexity.

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The general case is that the program will have more than zero total bytes of input. So in the general case the program will have to allocate a buffer. It's simpler not to have a special case for empty input.

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Assuming that we are reading a file (or stream) into memory, and we don't know in advance how large it will be, we will have to make multiple memory allocations. My question is, why do we have to allocate the last buffer -- which doesn't end up being used. –  nobar Jan 14 '12 at 5:45
1  
Many many programs simply read into a buffer, process the whole buffer (or almost the whole buffer), and then reuse the same buffer, so only one buffer is allocated. (Any program that uses stdio to process one line at a time works this way.) Reading the entire file into memory is less common. And it was much much less common when the Unix API was first evolving and even 256KB was a lot of RAM. –  rob mayoff Jan 14 '12 at 5:53
    
Good point that a lot of POSIX programs will reuse a single input buffer -- for that case there's no problem. –  nobar Jan 14 '12 at 6:37

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