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Let f(N) be the number of points with integer coordinates that are on a circle passing through (0,0), (N,0), (0,N), and (N,N).

It can be shown that f(10000) = 36.

What is the sum of all positive integers N  1011 such that f(N) = 420 ?

Alright, so I think that I have the basic idea for Project Euler number 233. Here is my code:

/*
 * Andrew Koroluk
 */

public class euler233 {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(f(10000));
    System.out.println(f(1328125));
    System.out.println(f(84246500));
    System.out.println(f(248431625));
    //if(true) return;

    double ans = 0;
    for(double N=10000; N<=(Math.pow(10, 11)); N++) {
        //System.out.println(N);
        if( f(N)==420 ) {
            ans+= N;
            System.out.println(N);
        }
    }
    System.out.println(ans);
}
static double f(double N) {
    double ans = 0;     
    double r = Math.sqrt(2*N*N)/2;
    //System.out.println(r*r);
    double r2 = r*r;

    for(int x=1; x<=r; x++) {
        for(int y=1; y<=r; y++) {
            if( x*x + y*y == r2 ) {
                ans+=4;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return ans;
}
static boolean isInt(double a) {
    if(a==(int)a) return true;
    return false;
}
}

Basically what I am doing is finding solutions for right triangles inscribed inside the circle, having a hypotenuse the length of the circles diameter. I am not positive that my code is correct.

If it is correct, then my problem is optimizing the f(N) function and optimizing the loop to find numbers for f(N) = 420.

New Code:

public class euler233 {
    static long[] primes;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(r(1328125));
        Clock c = new Clock();
        System.out.println(f2(10000));
        c.getTimeSeconds();
        c.reset();

        System.out.println(f2(1328125));
        c.getTimeSeconds();
    }
    static long f2(long N) {
        return SquaresR2(N*N);
    }
    static boolean isInt(long a) {
        if(a==(int)a) return true;
        return false;
    }
    static int SquaresR2(long n) {
        //System.out.println("start");
        int sum = 0;
        outer:
        for(int a=0; a<Math.sqrt(n)-1; a++) {
            for(int b=0; b<Math.sqrt(n)-1; b++) {
                if( a*a + b*b == n ) {
                    if(a>b) break outer;
                    sum+=4;
                    System.out.println(n+" = "+a+"^2 + "+b+"^2");
                }
            }
        }
        sum*=2;

        if(Math.sqrt(n)==(int)Math.sqrt(n)) sum+=4;
        return sum;
    }
    static int r(int n) {
        return 4*(d1(n) - d3(n));
    }
    private static int d1(int n) {
        int k=1, sum=0;
        while(true) {
            int d = 4*k+1;
            if(d>n) break;
            if(n%d==0) sum++;
            k++;
        }
        return sum;
    }
    private static int d3(int n) {
        int k=1, sum=0;
        while(true) {
            int d = 4*k+3;
            if(d>n) break;
            if(n%d==0) sum++;
            k++;
        }
        return sum;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the question here? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 14 '12 at 3:56
    
1. Is my approach correct? 2. How can I optimize the code to run quickly? –  Andrew Koroluk Jan 14 '12 at 3:59
    
Why dont you define the problem as a courtesy to those who don't want to look it up. –  Amir Afghani Jan 14 '12 at 4:02
    
@Amir Afghani - edited :) –  Andrew Koroluk Jan 14 '12 at 4:11
2  
-1 and vote to close. The rules of project-euler discourage using foreign help. From the bottom of the problems page: If you can't solve it, then you can't solve it! projecteuler.net/problems –  user unknown Jan 14 '12 at 16:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A few points:

  1. Don't use floating point numbers for this.
  2. Apart from that, your algorithm is in principle correct.
  3. But it won't finish before the heat death of the universe.

You have to find a much better approach, a few hints:

  1. Use only integer maths.
  2. Have a look at an introduction to number theory. Squares and right triangles might be interesting. Oh, and primes.
  3. Have fun.
  4. Let me repeat, number theory (but very basic, you can understand the relevant bits with high school math background; you will have to invest a bit of time though).
share|improve this answer
    
-1 The idea of project-euler is to find the solution yourself. From the bottom of the problems page: If you can't solve it, then you can't solve it! See projecteuler.net/problems . –  user unknown Jan 14 '12 at 16:22
2  
Thanks for explaining the downvote, I appreciate that. I know the idea of doing it yourself quite well, but the general advice given here is well within limits, you can get much more concrete hints for numerous problems at the forum - or at least one could when I was still involved. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 14 '12 at 16:31
    
In the forum, you can discuss your solution, after solving the problem. –  user unknown Jan 14 '12 at 16:37
    
I meant the companion site, take a look at this topic, some near-spoilers there. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 14 '12 at 16:44
2  
@userunknown which spoilers are on your side? Just to be clear, I find your position with respect to hints way exaggerated, but not fundamentally wrong. Hints should be not too explicit. But nudging people carefully in the right direction was very much part of the game, we all participated in that. I maintain that my hints (don't do it that way, learn some elementary number theory instead) were adequate, and part of the reason for my answer was to discourage more explicit guidance. You have the right to disagree, of course. Reasonable people can draw the line at different points. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 14 '12 at 18:26

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