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I am trying to edit a string of HTML (from a textarea) using jQuery. When I use this code, links are removed from the resulting string, as expected:

      $('#foo').find('a').remove();
      $('#foo').html(); // links are removed, as expected

But when I use the code below, the links don't get removed.

      $('#foo').remove('a');
      $('#foo').html(); // links are still there

Why doesn't this work? I have read the jQuery API documentation for .remove(), and I still don't understand.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The 'a' selector is a top level filter. It takes the current set, looks for elements that match the selector, and removes them.

$('#foo').remove('a');

The filter doesn't search nested elements.

So if you did this...

$('.myClass').remove('a');

...and the .myClass selector matched the following elements...

<p class="myClass">a paragraph</p>
<a class="myClass">an anchor</a>  <!-- will be removed -->
<p class="myClass">
    <a>a NESTED anchor</a>
</p>
<a class="myClass">an anchor</a>  <!-- will be removed -->
<a class="myClass">an anchor</a>  <!-- will be removed -->
<p class="myClass">
    <a>a NESTED anchor</a>
</p>
<p class="myClass">a paragraph</p>

...then only the <a> elements at the top level would be removed from the set

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remove operates on the set of elements that you have already matched, optionally filtering that set even further if you pass it an argument. So here's what each version does:

Find all the <a> descendants of #foo and remove them:

$('#foo').find('a').remove(); 

Find all the <a> elements that are in the set of #foo and remove them:

$('#foo').remove('a'); 

So this last one will do absolutely nothing if #foo is not an <a> itself; if it is (<a id="foo">) then this element will be removed. It's essentially the same as if you wrote

$('a#foo').remove();

Hope this helps. :)

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difference is

$('#foo').remove('a');//This will help to get rid of <a /> in the dom structure.
$('#foo').remove();//This will remove the element with id foo
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What do you mean by "filter <a/> out"? This syntax will actually remove any <a> elements within the initial jQuery object from the DOM. –  nnnnnn Jan 14 '12 at 4:29
    
Sorry for the confusion, filter means it will get rid of the <a/> tag. Updated the description. –  Gran Jan 14 '12 at 4:51
    
I believe that the first one will remove the element with id foo iff its element name is a. –  Mikko Rantalainen Mar 7 at 15:16
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