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I'd like to use the following function to return a transposed pointer to a multidimensional array.

Code

float** Matrix3f::Transpose( void )
{

    float matrix[MATRIX3_DIMS][MATRIX3_DIMS] =
    {
        { mMatrix[ 0 ][ 0 ], mMatrix[ 1 ][ 0 ], mMatrix[ 2 ][ 0 ] },
        { mMatrix[ 0 ][ 1 ], mMatrix[ 1 ][ 1 ], mMatrix[ 2 ][ 1 ] },
        { mMatrix[ 0 ][ 2 ], mMatrix[ 1 ][ 2 ], mMatrix[ 2 ][ 2 ] }
    };

    float** ret = new float*[ MATRIX3_DIMS ];

    for ( int i = 0; i < MATRIX3_DIMS; i++ )
    {
        for ( int j = 0; j < MATRIX3_DIMS; j++ )
        {
            ( *ret )[ i ][ j ] = matrix[ i ][ j ];
        }
    }

    return ret;

}

Description

As shown, I declare a multidimensional array using initialization syntax(using the class-member matrix - mMatrix - to create a transposed version of the matrix itself. I then assign a multidimensional pointer to an array (ret) and loop through, assigning each member of the local array - matrix - to the ret pointer array.

The error I receive is the following:

error: invalid types ‘float[int]’ for array subscript

Question

What exactly am I doing wrong, and how can I accomplish this task?

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3  
You are allocating only rows for 2D array and not the columns. You have to new float[MATRIX3_DIMS] for columns also. –  iammilind Jan 14 '12 at 5:05
4  
There are multiple things wrong here but the syntax error is because you need to replace '(*ret)' with just 'ret' -- you're trying to dereference a ptr-to-ptr type three times when it can only be dereferenced twice. –  mcmcc Jan 14 '12 at 5:08
2  
@iammilind also ( *ret )[ i ][ j ] dereferences a float ** 3 times. ret is a float**, *ret is a float* and (*ret)[i] is a float. You can't do float f; f[0]; but that's basically what you do and what the compiler complains about. Also I'd recommend that you allocate the matrix with new float[height*width] and access it with mat[i%width+j*width] or write a small wrapper class and override the subscript operator. –  PeterT Jan 14 '12 at 5:08
    
Oh, silly me... –  blissfreak Jan 14 '12 at 5:09
    
I hope you are planning on releasing the memory afterwards. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 14 '12 at 5:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ret is a pointer to pointer to float. When you dereference it, like this: (*ret), you get a pointer to float. When you take an index on that, like this: ( *ret )[ i ], that gives you a float. When you take an index on that, like this: ( *ret )[ i ][ j ], well, you're trying to index off of a float. That's not legal.

Putting my disgust for this style of coding aside, the first thing you're doing wrong is you are not allocating the sub-arrays. The compiler error though, refers to the error I illustrated in the first paragraph. Just remove the dereferencing of ret to fix that. You end up with this:

for ( int i = 0; i < MATRIX3_DIMS; i++ )
{
    ret[i] = new float[MATRIX3_DIMS];
    for ( int j = 0; j < MATRIX3_DIMS; j++ )
    {
        ret[ i ][ j ] = matrix[ i ][ j ];
    }
}

This is totally not exception safe though, and you should be using a class that properly manages memory in an exception safe way, like std::vector.

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