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I've searched SO and found several answers obviously related to my question, and have read the following as well:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860 http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/index.html http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/genmethods.html

But they're a little over my head (I'm fairly new to Java and Android).

I'm trying to understand how to implement a generic in a custom class. I think an example would be the best way to explain it.

Let's say I start off with this base class:

import java.util.ArrayList;

import android.content.Context;
import android.widget.ImageView;

public class ViewPool {

    private ArrayList<ImageView> employed;
    private ArrayList<ImageView> unemployed;

    private Context context;

    public ViewPool(Context context){

        this.context = context;

        employed = new ArrayList<ImageView>();
        unemployed = new ArrayList<ImageView>();

    }

    public ImageView employView(){      
        ImageView v;
        if(unemployed.size() > 0){
            v = unemployed.get(0);
            unemployed.remove(v);
        } else {
            v = new ImageView(context);
        }
        employed.add(v);
        return v;
    }

    public void retireView(ImageView v){
        if(employed.contains(v)){
            employed.remove(v);
            unemployed.add(v);
        }
    }
}

Now let's say I want to modify the above to work with any View type, passed like:

new ViewPool<ImageView>(this);

or...

new ViewPool<TextView>(this);

How would I rewrite the class listed above to accept types like that? My initial attempts, something like this next code block, failed for what are probably obvious reasons...

public class ViewPool<E> {
...
    public E employView(){      
        E v;
        if(unemployed.size() > 0){
            v = unemployed.get(0);
            unemployed.remove(v);
        } else {
            v = new E(context);  // this line's obviously bad, but not sure what would be correct
        }
        employed.add(v);
        return v;
    }
...

Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try

 public class ViewPool<E extends View>

then to instanciate your view, you could use a factory with the signature :

 public abstract class ViewFactory<E extends View> {
    public E createView( Context c );
 }

and use it in you viewpool to get the new instance of E, injecting the dependency at construction time for viewpool :

public class ViewPool<E extends View> {

ViewFactory<E> factory;

public viewpool( ViewFactory<E> factory ) {
   this.factory = factory;
}

public E employView(){      
    E v;
    if(unemployed.size() > 0){
        v = unemployed.get(0);
        unemployed.remove(v);
    } else {
        v = factory.createView( context );  
    }
    employed.add(v);
    return v;
}

}

Then create your viewpool using :

ViewFactory<TextView> factory = new ViewFactory<TextView>() { 
    public TextView createView( Context c ) {
       return new TextView( c );
    }
}
new ViewPool<TextView>( factory );
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply... How then would I go about getting a reference to the generic so I could instance a new <E>? –  momo Jan 14 '12 at 7:56
    
look at my example, you should use the factory to achieve this. There is no inheritance of constructors in java, thus it's not possible to use any general form of a constructor to create a view from a generics notation. The work around (and actually a good design) is to use a factory. Moreover it has 2 advantages : you separate pooling from creation of instances in the pool and you explicitly declare a dependency toward an object responsible of objects creations. –  Snicolas Jan 14 '12 at 8:26
    
yeah, the question in my first comment was before your example was up. I see what you're doing, and can appreciate the pattern. thanks –  momo Jan 14 '12 at 9:06

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