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I have read a bit about lazy loading in c# and this might seem like a very basic question, but I am wondering whether autoproperties are lazy loading per default. Eg.:

public Color MyColor { get; set; }

Or would I have to implement something along the lines of

private Color _color;
public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
      if(_color==null)
      { 
       _color=new Color("red");
      }
      return _color;
  }
 }

Thanks Thomas

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Auto properties simply get a backing field generated by the compiler.

So, this:

public Color MyColor { get; set; }

Will end up like this:

private Color _color;
public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
      return _color;
  }

  set
  {
      _color = value;
  }
 }

So they are not lazy loaded - you will need to implement this yourself.

You could instantiate the backing field like this:

private Color _color = new Color("red");

With auto properties, you could set a default using the constructor:

// in the constructor:
MyColor = new Color("red");
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No, they're not lazy laoaded, an auto property is the same as doing this

private Color _color;
public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
      return _color;
  }
  set 
  {
      _color = value;
   }
 }
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Auto properties are just syntactic sugar for the common pattern of a property that does straight reads and writes to a backing field with no other logic.

If you want to lazy load, you want either the second form you give, a more complicated version of the first form you give or else:

private Lazy<Color> _color = new Lazy<Color>(() => new Color("red"));
public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
      return _color.Value;
  }
}

Which in this case is just more complicated, but in some other cases is simpler.

There are variants of the lazy-load pattern which either ignore thead-safety issues (yours does), which depending on a few things might still be thread-safe (it depends on whether or not it's an issue for mulitple Color creations to happen and for some to be over-written until one eventually "wins", and often it isn't an issue though it is something you need to consider if there could be multiple concurrent calls), to allow multiple calls to the constructor but ensure only one ever "wins" and becomes the value used, or to allow only one call ever to happen.

These three variants or of increasing cost in the case where there is only one thread, but increasing safety and decreasing cost if you have lots of concurrent calls, so each of the three has its place.

public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
    if(_color == null)
    {
      var c = new Color("red");//allow multiple creations but...
      Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _color, c, null);//only one write
    }
    return _color;
  }
}

public Color MyColor
{
  get
  {
    if(_color == null)
      lock(somelock)
        if(_color == null)
          _color = new Color("red");//allow one creation only
    return _color;
  }
}

With Lazy<Color> there is a form of the constructor that takes a LazyThreadSafetyMode value indicating which approach you want.

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In your very first line of code you are missing a ) –  Nuffin Jan 14 '12 at 12:12
    
@Tobias Thanks. For that matter, there's worse flaws. –  Jon Hanna Jan 14 '12 at 21:32
    
That may or may not be true, but that particular one just happened to catch my eye ;) –  Nuffin Jan 14 '12 at 21:43

If you write

public Color MyColor { get; set; }

then your property will always be null until you instantiate it.

this.MyColor = new Color("red");

Auto-properties are just a shortcut.

public Color MyColor { get; set; }

in the same as

private Color _MyColor;
public Color MyColor
{
    get
    {
        return this._MyColor;
    }

    set
    {
        this._MyColor = value;
    }
}
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Properties

public Color MyColor { get; set; }  

Pros:

  1. Allows you to avoid using fields/variables. Using reflection, I'm unaware of a way to set values for fields. So I opt for Properties when possible.

Cons:

  • Terrible with the debugger. What variable name is this property associated with? Hopefully Microsoft automatically used _MyColor, but it very well could be something cryptic.

Fields

public Color MyColor;  

Pros:

  • No complexity
  • Easy to use with debugger

Cons:

  • I can't immediately think how to get and set values to this using reflection. If it's possible, then there may not be any downside to this, in comparison to the Lazy Property.

Personally, I use Properties every time because it also allows you to add bounds checking and whatnot within the property get/set. I don't like having bounds checking everywhere unless it's to prevent operations with respect to the function I'm coding in.

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1  
Theres is absolutely NO cons with auto-properties. In the other hand I see tons of cons for public fields... –  ken2k Jan 14 '12 at 10:32
    
public fields break incapsulation and must never be used any project. –  oleksii Jan 14 '12 at 10:46
1  
@ken2k: those are cons of fields vs properties in general. Auto properties cannot have a readonly backing field. –  Groo Jan 14 '12 at 10:50
    
@Groo I wouldn't call the example you specified a cons. If a use case doesn't apply to auto-properties (such as INotifyPropertyChanged implementation), then don't use them. But it's not a "cons". It's just a "doesn't apply". On the other hand, there are no cons in replacing public fields by public auto-properties. –  ken2k Jan 14 '12 at 10:59

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