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I have just started reading "Spring In Action - Third edition" and am stuck up while experimenting with wiring concepts. I am unable to understand the lifecycle of a bean after writing this code :

    public class TestCase {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ApplicationContext context = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("test.xml");
        Test1 t1 = (Test1)context.getBean("test1");
        t1.setName1("Win");
        Test1 t2 = (Test1)context.getBean("test1");
        t2.setName1("Lin");
        Test2 t3 = (Test2)context.getBean("test2");
        Test1 t4 = t3.getName();
        System.out.println("End" +t4.getName1());

    }

}

public class Test1 {

    private String name1;

    public String getName1() {
        System.out.println("test1 - getter");
        return name1;
    }

    public void setName1(String name1) {
        System.out.println("test1 - setter");
        this.name1 = name1;
    }

    public void onStart()
    {
        System.out.println("start1");
    }

    public void onStop()
    {
        System.out.println("stop1");
    }
}


public class Test2 {

    private int age;
    private Test1 name;
    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }
    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
    public Test1 getName() {
        System.out.println("test2 - getter");
        return name;
    }
    public void setName(Test1 name) {
        System.out.println("test2 - setter");
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void onStart()
    {
        System.out.println("start2");
    }

    public void onStop()
    {
        System.out.println("stop2");
    }
}

Here's my test.xml :

<bean id="test1" class="springidol.Test1" init-method="onStart" destroy-method="onStop" >
</bean>

<bean id="test2" class="springidol.Test2" init-method="onStart" destroy-method="onStop">
<property name="name" ref="test1"></property>
</bean>

The output is :

   start1
test2 - setter
start2
test1 - setter
test1 - setter
test2 - getter
test1 - getter
End - Lin

If I change the Test1 scope to prototype I get :

start1
test2 - setter
start2
start1
test1 - setter
start1
test1 - setter
test2 - getter
test1 - getter
End - null

I know I am asking for too much, but can someone get me the steps involved here - I cant understand why test2 setter is getting called after loading of tst1 is done (and even before test2 is loaded) !

Secondly, why are the "End" outputs for prototype and default scopes different ? Thanks.

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Accepting the partial solution... was expecting an answer to my other queries too :( –  SlowAndSteady Jan 14 '12 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because Spring does set the references to other beans first. (Wiring of the beans) After that the init methods will be invoked.

Since your test2 setter points to a reference of test1 within your application context configuration it will be invoked first.

----------edit------------

The prototype scope is a little bit tricky, since it behaves different depending if your prototype scoped bean is a proxy or not.

If you get the prototyped bean from the application context directly, like you did, you will get a new instance each time. Setting a name to the first instance will not affect the name of the second instance you write out at the end.

But if a prototype scoped bean is referenced within the application context from another singleton bean, a proxy is injected. This proxy will even switch the actually invoked instance for every method call on it. This will be more irritating since:

Test1 t4 = t3.getName(); 
t4.setName1("lala");
assertEquals(null,t4.getName1()); //will be true

But please verify that, since thats what I suppose it is doing. I did not verified it by code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Omnaest. Is it like the constructors and init-methods are called after wiring (setter methods) ? Seems very strange to me... And why isnt the destroy-method being called ? –  SlowAndSteady Jan 14 '12 at 11:10
    
Possibly you kill the JVM and you dont shut the application context down. The destroy method is called for the latter action. –  Omnaest Jan 14 '12 at 19:36

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