Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need a generic function that can take either a const or non-const reference to a container, and return the corresponding reference to elements qualified as per the container.

Something along these lines:

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C& c, int i ) -> /* not-sure-what, but let's call it T */
{
      //.... some tricky code here ...
}

I would like to stress that if C expands to

SomeContainer const

then T would be

SomeContainer::const_reference

and otherwise

SomeContainer::reference

I think I can put it together using type traits and mtl if, my question is if there is a shorter, cleaner way.

I'm using C++x11 (obviously) and boost.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
If you pass an rvalue as the first parameter to get_nth, do you want to return an lvalue reference or an rvalue reference to the i-th element? – fredoverflow Jan 14 '12 at 12:04
    
@FredOverflow I'm only interested on lvalues. The correct thing is then to use ...(C& c...) in that case, right? – dsign Jan 14 '12 at 12:16
    
Yes. Nevertheless, I will update my answer :) – fredoverflow Jan 14 '12 at 12:30
1  
What's the problem with *std::next(begin(c), i);? – pmr Jan 14 '12 at 13:50
    
@pmr very nice! – fredoverflow Jan 14 '12 at 14:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you are looking for typename C::reference, see 23.2.1 [container.requirements.general] §4.


Oh wait, the above doesn't work if C is already const. But wait, decltype to the rescue!

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C&& c, int i ) -> decltype(*c.begin())
{
      //.... some tricky code here ...
}

If you also want to support C-style arrays which have no begin member function:

#include <iterator>

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C&& c, int i ) -> decltype(*std::begin(c))
{
      //.... some tricky code here ...
}

And the implementation really isn't that tricky:

#include <iterator>

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C&& c, int i ) -> decltype(*std::begin(c))
{
    auto it = std::begin(c);
    std::advance(it, i);
    return *it;
}

Note that the above solution accepts lvalues and rvalues, but it will always return an lvalue reference. Depending on the client code, this may be a performance concern. Take the following example code:

std::string s = get_nth(std::vector<std::string> { "hello", "world" }, 0);

This will copy the result into s, even though moving it would be perfectly valid (and, of course, faster).

To solve this problem, we need two overloads, one for lvalues and one for rvalues:

#include <iterator>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C& c, int i ) -> decltype(*std::begin(c))
{
    auto it = std::begin(c);
    std::advance(it, i);
    return *it;
}

template <typename C>
auto get_nth( C&& c, int i )
-> typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<C&&>::value,
                           decltype(std::move(*std::begin(c)))>::type
{
    auto it = std::begin(c);
    std::advance(it, i);
    return std::move(*it);
}

Now the result will be moved into s. The enable_if part is necessary because due to reference collapsing rules, C&& can also bind to lvalues, and then the call to initialize s would be ambiguous.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It is not as clean as I would like, but it is a lot better of what I had in mind. – dsign Jan 14 '12 at 12:01
    
If only it allowed for ADL of begin... :-) – Kerrek SB Jan 14 '12 at 14:03
    
@KerrekSB: I knew somebody would find an opportunity for improvement somewhere :) – fredoverflow Jan 14 '12 at 14:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.