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I have a WCF service and an resource with records (having IDs to identify them). I want that only 1 ID can be accessed simultaneously - so i have written a little resource helper:

public sealed class ConcurrencyIdManager
{
    private static object _syncRootGrant = new object();
    private static List<int> _IdsInUse = new List<int>();

    ... // singleton        

    public void RequestAndWaitForIdGrant(int id)
    {
        lock (_syncRootGrant)
        {
            while (_IdsInUse.Where(i => i == id).Count() != 0)
            {
               Monitor.Wait(_syncRootGrant);
            }             

            _IdsInUse.Add(id);                
        }
    }

    public void ReleaseGrantForId(int id)
    {
        lock (_syncRootGrant)
        {                
            _IdsInUse.Remove(id);

            Monitor.PulseAll(_syncRootGrant);
        }
    }

So in my WCF service i have

public void UpdateMySpecialEntity(Entity foo)
{
   ConcurrencyIdManager.Instance.RequestAndWaitForIdGrant(foo.Id);
   try {
      // do something with the entity foo
   }
   finally { ConcurrencyIdManager.Instance.ReleaseGrantForId(foo.Id); }
}

Is the implementation correct so far? :-)

share|improve this question
    
If I read your code correctly, you're not working with 1 resource at a time, you're allowing at most one thread at any given time to work on a resource. Wouldn't it be easier to just have a lockable object per resource? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 14 '12 at 11:44
    
What I'm trying to achive is: * it should be allowed to Update several entities with different Ids by multiple threads * it should not be allowed to update an entity with Id X simultaneously. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "a lockable object per resource" ? If you mean per ressource item - thats not possible because the amount is infinite (assume ressource is a database in this case) –  damike Jan 14 '12 at 12:08
    
Which version of .NET are you using? Do you have access to ConcurrentBag<T>? Also this code will block the whole access to the List<T>, not only to the particular ID, so there is no need to do extra blocking with Wait and Pulse. –  oleksii Jan 14 '12 at 12:29
    
.NET 4. Hmm I'm not quite sure what do you mean with "whole access to the List<T>". I have written a little demo pastebin.com/xXJU2Vsj The slow client for Id 2 doesnt block the other 2 clients for Id 1 - but the other clients for Id 1 block themselves. I'm new to this topic - so sorry if i misunderstood something :) –  damike Jan 14 '12 at 12:44
    
@damike - like @oleksii says try to use ConcurrentBag<T>. –  Daniel A. White Jan 14 '12 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If am reading your notes right, you want id's 3 4 and 5 to edit simultaneously, but two threads with id 5 to block and wait for each other.

In that case use a concurrent collection of lock objects and use a simple lock on the object for that Id.

e.g. in pseudo c#

ConcurrentDictionary<int,object> lockObjects = new ConcurrentDictionary<int,object)
public void UpdateMySpecialEntity(Entity foo)
{
    object idLock =  lockObject.GetOrAdd(foo.id,new object());
    lock (idLock)
    {
    // do lock sensitive stuff in here.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thx a lot!! How can i safely remove content from lockObjects from time to time? –  damike Oct 21 '13 at 11:47
    
You could try lockObject.TryRemove(foo.id) –  Jason Hernandez Oct 22 '13 at 16:20

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