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What's the most efficient algorithm anyone can think of that, given a natural number n, returns the least natural number x with n positive divisors (including 1 and x)? For example, given 4 the algorithm should result in 6 (divisors: 1,2,3,6); i.e. 6 is the smallest number having 4 distinct factors. Similarly, given 6, the algorithm should result in 12 (divisors: 1,2,3,4,6,12); i.e. 12 is the smallest number having 6 distinct factors

In terms of real-world performance, I'm looking for a scalable algorithm which can give answers of the order of 1020 within 2 seconds on a machine which can do 107 computations per second.

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1  
Please elaborate more. – shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 14 '12 at 11:48
    
@user401445 I'm afraid you create a wrong impression of an arrogant person. – alf Jan 14 '12 at 11:48
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that one was for Preet...he deleted his comment..I have edited the question for you to make it more clear – user401445 Jan 14 '12 at 11:49
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I downvoted you for the poor question asking strategy. What you've got here is a statement; it can't hurt to be a little bit more clear on why you're doing this, what language, etc ... – Noon Silk Jan 14 '12 at 11:50
3  
Awesome edit @outis – Till Jan 14 '12 at 12:26
up vote 10 down vote accepted

http://www.primepuzzles.net/problems/prob_019.htm

b) Jud McCranie, T.W.A. Baumann & Enoch Haga sent basically the same procedure to find N(d) for a given d:

  1. Factorize d as a product of his prime divisors: d = p1a1 * p2a2 *p3a3 *...
  2. convert this factorization in another arithmetically equivalent factorization, composed of non-powered monotonically decreasing and not necesarilly prime factors... (uf!...) d = p1a1 * p2a2 *p3a3 *... = b1 * b2 * b3... such that b1 ≥ b2 ≥ b3...
    You must realize that for every given d, there are several arithmetically equivalent factorizations that can be done: by example:
    if d = 16 = 24 then there are 5 equivalent factorizations: d = 2*2*2*2 = 4*2*2 = 4*4 = 8*2 = 16
  3. N is the minimal number resulting of computing 2b1-1 * 3b2-1 * 5b3-1 * ... for all the equivalent factorizations of d. Working the same example:
    N(16) = the minimal of these {2 * 3 * 5 * 7, 23 * 3 * 5, 23 * 33, 27 * 3, 215} = 23 * 3 * 5 = 120

Update: With numbers around 1020, pay attention to the notes by Christian Bau quoted on the same page.

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Here is the high level gist of my Javascript - where factorCount represents the number of divisors:

  • Find the prime factor decomposition of the factorCount
  • Generate every unique combination of these prime factors
  • For each combination, extract these combination values from the original prime factor array and add one value to this array that is the extracted values multiplied together. Then sort in decending order.
  • For each array created by the previous step, check which yields the minimal number when computing 2^(b1-1)*3^(b2-1)5^(b3-1)...
  • This minimum number computed is the smallest number with factorCount number of divisors

Here's a high level code breakdown of my JavaScript functions:

var primeFactors = findPrimeFactors(factorCount);
var primeFactorCombinations = removeDuplicateArrays(generateCombinations(primeFactors, 1));
var combinedFactorCandidates = generateCombinedFactorCombinations(primeFactors, primeFactorCombinations);
var smallestNumberWithFactorCount = determineMinimumCobination(combinedFactorCandidates);

And here's the full sha-bang:

function smallestNumberByFactorCount(factorCount) {

  function isPrime(primeCandidate) {
    var p = 2;
    var top = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(primeCandidate));
    while(p<=top){
      if(primeCandidate%p === 0){ return false; }
      p++;
    }
    return true;
  }

  function findPrimeAfter(currentPrime) {
    var nextPrimeCandidate = currentPrime + 1
    while(true) {
      if(isPrime(nextPrimeCandidate)){
        return nextPrimeCandidate;
      } else {
        nextPrimeCandidate++;
      }
    }
  }

  function findPrimeFactors(factorParent) {
    var primeFactors = [];
    var primeFactorCandidate = 2;
    while(factorParent !== 1){
      while(factorParent % primeFactorCandidate === 0 && factorParent !== 1 ){
        primeFactors.push(primeFactorCandidate);
        factorParent /= primeFactorCandidate;
      }
      primeFactorCandidate = findPrimeAfter(primeFactorCandidate);
    }
    return primeFactors;
  }

  function sortArrayByValue(a,b){
    return a-b;
  }

  function clone3DArray(arrayOfArrays) {
    var cloneArray = arrayOfArrays.map(function(arr) {
      return arr.slice();
    });
    return cloneArray;
  }

  function doesArrayOfArraysContainArray(arrayOfArrays, array){
    var aOA = clone3DArray(arrayOfArrays);
    var a = array.slice(0);
    for(let i=0; i<aOA.length; i++){
      if(aOA[i].sort().join(',') === a.sort().join(',')){
        return true;
      }
    }
    return false;
  }

  function removeDuplicateArrays(combinations) {
    var uniqueCombinations = []
    for(let c=0; c<combinations.length; c++){
      if(!doesArrayOfArraysContainArray(uniqueCombinations, combinations[c])){
        uniqueCombinations[uniqueCombinations.length] = combinations[c];
      }
    }
    return uniqueCombinations;
  }

  function generateCombinations(parentArray, minComboLength) {
    var generate = function(n, src, got, combinations) {
      if(n === 0){
        if(got.length > 0){
          combinations[combinations.length] = got;
        }
        return;
      }
      for (let j=0; j<src.length; j++){
        generate(n - 1, src.slice(j + 1), got.concat([src[j]]), combinations);
      }
      return;
    }
    var combinations = [];
    for(let i=minComboLength; i<parentArray.length; i++){
      generate(i, parentArray, [], combinations);
    }
    combinations.push(parentArray);
    return combinations;
  }

  function generateCombinedFactorCombinations(primeFactors, primeFactorCombinations) {
    var candidates = [];
    for(let p=0; p<primeFactorCombinations.length; p++){
      var product = 1;
      var primeFactorsCopy = primeFactors.slice(0);
      for(let q=0; q<primeFactorCombinations[p].length; q++){
        product *= primeFactorCombinations[p][q];
        primeFactorsCopy.splice(primeFactorsCopy.indexOf(primeFactorCombinations[p][q]), 1);
      }
      primeFactorsCopy.push(product);
      candidates[candidates.length] = primeFactorsCopy.sort(sortArrayByValue).reverse();
    }
    return candidates;
  }

  function determineMinimumCobination (candidates){
    var minimumValue = Infinity;
    var bestFactorCadidate = []
    for(let y=0; y<candidates.length; y++){
      var currentValue = 1;
      var currentPrime = 2;
      for(let z=0; z<combinedFactorCandidates[y].length; z++){
        currentValue *= Math.pow(currentPrime,(combinedFactorCandidates[y][z])-1);
        currentPrime = findPrimeAfter(currentPrime);
      }
      if(currentValue < minimumValue){
        minimumValue = currentValue;
        bestFactorCadidate = combinedFactorCandidates[y];
      }
    }
    return minimumValue;
  }

  var primeFactors = findPrimeFactors(factorCount);
  var primeFactorCombinations = removeDuplicateArrays(generateCombinations(primeFactors, 1));
  var combinedFactorCandidates = generateCombinedFactorCombinations(primeFactors, primeFactorCombinations);
  var smallestNumberWithFactorCount = determineMinimumCobination(combinedFactorCandidates);

  return smallestNumberWithFactorCount;
}

Paste the above code block into your browser console and you can test it out yourself:

> smallestNumberByFactorCount(3) --> 4
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(4) --> 6
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(5) --> 16
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(6) --> 12
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(100) --> 45360
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(500) --> 62370000
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(5000) --> 4727833110000
> smallestNumberByFactorCount(100000000) --> 1.795646397225103e+40

My algorithm starts shitting the bed when the input gets up to around 100 million... so for Project Euler problem 500 where the input would be 2^500500 (a really, really, really big number) you would need another approach. However, this is a good general approach that gets you pretty far. Hope it helps.

Please leave comments with efficiency optimization suggestions. I would love to hear them.

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