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What's the most efficient algorithm anyone can think of that, given a natural number n, returns the least natural number x with n positive divisors (including 1 and x)? For example, given 4 the algorithm should result in 6 (divisors: 1,2,3,6); i.e. 6 is the smallest number having 4 distinct factors. Similarly, given 6, the algorithm should result in 12 (divisors: 1,2,3,4,6,12); i.e. 12 is the smallest number having 6 distinct factors

In terms of real-world performance, I'm looking for a scalable algorithm which can give answers of the order of 1020 within 2 seconds on a machine which can do 107 computations per second.

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Please elaborate more. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 14 '12 at 11:48
    
@user401445 I'm afraid you create a wrong impression of an arrogant person. –  alf Jan 14 '12 at 11:48
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that one was for Preet...he deleted his comment..I have edited the question for you to make it more clear –  user401445 Jan 14 '12 at 11:49
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I downvoted you for the poor question asking strategy. What you've got here is a statement; it can't hurt to be a little bit more clear on why you're doing this, what language, etc ... –  Noon Silk Jan 14 '12 at 11:50
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Awesome edit @outis –  Till Jan 14 '12 at 12:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

http://www.primepuzzles.net/problems/prob_019.htm

b) Jud McCranie, T.W.A. Baumann & Enoch Haga sent basically the same procedure to find N(d) for a given d:

  1. Factorize d as a product of his prime divisors: d = p1a1 * p2a2 *p3a3 *...
  2. convert this factorization in another arithmetically equivalent factorization, composed of non-powered monotonically decreasing and not necesarilly prime factors... (uf!...) d = p1a1 * p2a2 *p3a3 *... = b1 * b2 * b3... such that b1 ≥ b2 ≥ b3...
    You must realize that for every given d, there are several arithmetically equivalent factorizations that can be done: by example:
    if d = 16 = 24 then there are 5 equivalent factorizations: d = 2*2*2*2 = 4*2*2 = 4*4 = 8*2 = 16
  3. N is the minimal number resulting of computing 2b1-1 * 3b2-1 * 5b3-1 * ... for all the equivalent factorizations of d. Working the same example:
    N(16) = the minimal of these {2 * 3 * 5 * 7, 23 * 3 * 5, 23 * 33, 27 * 3, 215} = 23 * 3 * 5 = 120

Update: With numbers around 1020, pay attention to the notes by Christian Bau quoted on the same page.

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