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As std::vector isn't thread-safe, I was trying to build a very simple encapsulation around it which makes it thread-safe.

This works quite well, but there's one little problem. When the instance of the class is being destructed and another thread is still trying to read data out of it, the thread keeps hanging forever in the boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);

How could I solve this? The best is to just unlock the mutex in order that the thread hanging in it can continue executing. I haven't defined a destructor because until now, it was not required.

Here my code. Note that there are more methods than shown here, it's been simplified.

template<class T>
class SafeVector 
{
    public:
    SafeVector();
    SafeVector(const SafeVector<T>& other);

    unsigned int size() const;
    bool empty() const;

    void clear();
    T& operator[] (const unsigned int& n);

    T& front();
    T& back();

    void push_back(const T& val);
    T pop_back();

    void erase(int i);

    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator begin() const;
    typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator end() const;

    const SafeVector<T>& operator= (const SafeVector<T>& other);

    protected:
    mutable boost::mutex m_mutex;
    std::vector<T>  m_vector;

};

template<class T>
SafeVector<T>::SafeVector()
{

}

template<class T>
SafeVector<T>::SafeVector(const SafeVector<T>& other)
{
    this->m_vector = other.m_vector;
}

template<class T>
unsigned int SafeVector<T>::size() const
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.size();
}

template<class T>
bool SafeVector<T>::empty() const
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.empty();
}

template<class T>
void SafeVector<T>::clear()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.clear();
}

template<class T>
T& SafeVector<T>::operator[] (const unsigned int& n)
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return (this->m_vector)[n];
}

template<class T>
T& SafeVector<T>::front()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.front();
}

template<class T>
T& SafeVector<T>::back()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.back();
}

template<class T>
void SafeVector<T>::push_back(const T& val)
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    return this->m_vector.push_back(val);
}

template<class T>
T SafeVector<T>::pop_back()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    T back = m_vector.back();
    m_vector.pop_back();
    return back;
}

template<class T>
void SafeVector<T>::erase(int i)
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_mutex);
    this->m_vector.erase(m_vector.begin() + i);
}

template<class T>
typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator SafeVector<T>::begin() const
{
    return m_vector.begin();
}

template<class T>
typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator SafeVector<T>::end() const
{
    return m_vector.end();
}

Edit I have to change my definition. The container clearly is not thread-safe as stated before. It isn't supposed to do so - even if the nomenclature is misleading. Sure you can do things with it that aren't thread-safe at all! But only one thread writes into the container, 2 or 3 read from it. It works well until I try to stop the process. I have to state that a monitor would have been better. But time's running out and I cannot change this until then.

Any idea is appreciated! Thanks and regards.

share|improve this question
3  
I think you have threading issues at a higher level. It seems like an error for thread 1 to think that it is legitimate to destroy an object that thread 2 has a reference to and believes it can read from it. What if thread 1 actually managed to completely destroy the object and then thread 2 tried to read from it? –  Charles Bailey Jan 14 '12 at 13:47
1  
Wouldn't the copy constructor also have to lock the other vector? –  Kerrek SB Jan 14 '12 at 13:53
    
I'd be interested to see the implementation of the copy assignment operator, too. It would be easy to get it spectacularly wrong. –  Charles Bailey Jan 14 '12 at 13:55
2  
I don't see what's "safe" about this container. You freely hand out iterators references to elements, while also allowing mutating operations on the container itself - since you guard those, you clearly expect multiple threads to mutate the containers concurrently, which invalidates all iterators and references. Take a pick: either make a fully concurrent container that only allows element access by copy, or just be careful how you use the container. –  Kerrek SB Jan 14 '12 at 13:58
    
This is not what thread safety is. std::vector isn't thread safe for a reason. Thread safe containers are usually immutable. Moreover, even for thread safe objects (e.g. std::atomic<int> and boost::mutex itself) construction and destruction aren't thread safe. –  ybungalobill Jan 14 '12 at 14:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: Updated to be more complete example.

Others have pointed out the flaws with your "thread safety;" I'll attempt to answer your question.

The only proper way to do what you have set out to do is to make sure all of your threads have been shutdown before you try and destroy the vector itself.

A common method I have used is to simply use RAII to define the order of construction and destruction.

void doSomethingWithVector(SafeVector &t_vec)
{
  while (!boost::this_thread::interruption_requested())
  {
    //operate on t_vec
  }
}

class MyClassThatUsesThreadsAndStuff
{
  public:
    MyClassThatUsesThreadsAndStuff()
      : m_thread1(&doSomethingWithVector, boost::ref(m_vector)),
        m_thread2(&doSomethingWithVector, boost::ref(m_vector))
    {
      // RAII guarantees that the vector is created before the threads
    }

    ~MyClassThatUsesThreadsAndStuff()
    {
      m_thread1.interrupt();
      m_thread2.interrupt();
      m_thread1.join();
      m_thread2.join();
      // RAII guarantees that vector is freed after the threads are freed
    }

  private:
    SafeVector m_vector;
    boost::thread m_thread1;
    boost::thread m_thread2;
};

If you are looking for a more complete thread safe data structure that allows for multiple readers and writers, feel free to check out a queue I wrote using boost threads a while back.

http://code.google.com/p/crategameengine/source/browse/trunk/include/mvc/queue.hpp

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your response. i know about RAII. the "problem" here is that the joins don't always return... if I overlook your queue implementation, the principle seems to be the same to me: putting a scoped_lock everywhere you perform operations on the container - except that my implementation is lacking of the cancellation part. –  Atmocreations Jan 15 '12 at 9:35
    
I have blocking reads in my Queue class, which is why the cancellation is required. You do not have any "block and wait for data" features of your class. This lead me to assume the actual error is that the Mutex you were trying to access had been destroyed before / during a lock. The only way this could happen is if the Vector were destroyed before the thread. With my example above, you have now a cancellation example as well as guarantees that the the mutex cannot be destroyed before its useful life is done. –  lefticus Jan 15 '12 at 15:21

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