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I'm reading a JSON response with Gson, which returns somtimes a NumberFormatException because an expected int value is set to an empty string. Now I'm wondering what's the best way to handle this kind of exception. If the value is an empty string, the deserialization should be 0.

Expected JSON response:

{
   "name" : "Test1",
   "runtime" : 90
}

But sometimes the runtime is an empty string:

{
   "name" : "Test2",
   "runtime" : ""
}

The java class looks like this:

public class Foo
{
    private String name;
    private int runtime;
}

And the deserialization is this:

String input = "{\n" +
               "   \"name\" : \"Test\",\n" +
               "   \"runtime\" : \"\"\n" +
               "}";

Gson gson = new Gson();
Foo foo = gson.fromJson(input, Foo.class);

Which throws a com.google.gson.JsonSyntaxException: java.lang.NumberFormatException: empty String because an empty String is returned instead of an int value.

Is there a way to tell Gson, "if you deserialize the field runtime of the Type Foo and there is a NumberFormatException, just return the default value 0"?

My workaround is to use a String as the Type of the runtime field instead of int, but maybe there is a better way to handle such errors.

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This doesn't exactly answer your question, but maybe you should just omit the entire "runtime" field from the JSON? –  Mike Baranczak Jan 14 '12 at 16:17
    
Also, what happens when you change the field from int to Integer? –  Mike Baranczak Jan 14 '12 at 16:18
    
The JSON is the response of an webservice which I can't control, but I'm interested in the field runtime. Changing the field to Integer makes no difference. –  Soundlink Jan 14 '12 at 16:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

At first, I tried to write a general custom type adaptor for Integer values, to catch the NumberFormatException and return 0, but Gson doesn't allow TypeAdaptors for primitive Types:

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Cannot register type adapters for class java.lang.Integer

After that I introduced a new Type FooRuntime for the runtime field, so the Foo class now looks like this:

public class Foo
{
    private String name;
    private FooRuntime runtime;

    public int getRuntime()
    {
        return runtime.getValue();
    }
}

public class FooRuntime
{
    private int value;

    public FooRuntime(int runtime)
    {
        this.value = runtime;
    }

    public int getValue()
    {
        return value;
    }
}

A type adaptor handles the custom deserialization process:

public class FooRuntimeTypeAdapter implements JsonDeserializer<FooRuntime>, JsonSerializer<FooRuntime>
{
    public FooRuntime deserialize(JsonElement json, Type typeOfT, JsonDeserializationContext context) throws JsonParseException
    {
        int runtime;
        try
        {
            runtime = json.getAsInt();
        }
        catch (NumberFormatException e)
        {
            runtime = 0;
        }
        return new FooRuntime(runtime);
    }

    public JsonElement serialize(FooRuntime src, Type typeOfSrc, JsonSerializationContext context)
    {
        return new JsonPrimitive(src.getValue());
    }
}

Now it's necessary to use GsonBuilder to register the type adapter, so an empty string is interpreted as 0 instead of throwing a NumberFormatException.

String input = "{\n" +
               "   \"name\" : \"Test\",\n" +
               "   \"runtime\" : \"\"\n" +
               "}";

GsonBuilder builder = new GsonBuilder();
builder.registerTypeAdapter(FooRuntime.class, new FooRuntimeTypeAdapter());
Gson gson = builder.create();
Foo foo = gson.fromJson(input, Foo.class);
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8  
wow, that's a lot of code for something that should be trivial :-s –  Somatik May 28 '12 at 17:49

It might help you to always assume a default value of 0 for the field runtime in case of a NumberFormatException, since it can be the only source of error.

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain how you would tell the Gson object to do that. –  Soundlink Jan 14 '12 at 21:51
    
You do that using a type adapter. See here and here. –  Milad Naseri Jan 14 '12 at 21:58
    
Of course, a more fix-and-go solution would be to look for invalid input in the JSON string using regex and replacing that with a default 0 value. But I would recommend against that strongly. –  Milad Naseri Jan 14 '12 at 22:00
    
Thanks, your type adaptor comment gave me some ideas. –  Soundlink Jan 15 '12 at 0:00
    
No problem. :) –  Milad Naseri Jan 15 '12 at 0:06

Here is example I did for Long type.This is better option:

    public class LongTypeAdapter extends TypeAdapter<Long>{
    @Override
    public Long read(JsonReader reader) throws IOException {
        if(reader.peek() == JsonToken.NULL){
            reader.nextNull();
            return null;
        }
        String stringValue = reader.nextString();
        try{
            Long value = Long.valueOf(stringValue);
            return value;
        }catch(NumberFormatException e){
            return null;
        }
    }
    @Override
    public void write(JsonWriter writer, Long value) throws IOException {
        if (value == null) {
            writer.nullValue();
            return;
        }
        writer.value(value);
    }
}

You can refer this link for more.

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I've made this TypeAdapter which check for empty strings and return 0

public class IntegerTypeAdapter extends TypeAdapter<Number> {
@Override
public void write(JsonWriter jsonWriter, Number number) throws IOException {
    if (number == null) {
        jsonWriter.nullValue();
        return;
    }
    jsonWriter.value(number);
}

@Override
public Number read(JsonReader jsonReader) throws IOException {
    if (jsonReader.peek() == JsonToken.NULL) {
        jsonReader.nextNull();
        return null;
    }

    try {
        String value = jsonReader.nextString();
        if ("".equals(value)) {
            return 0;
        }
        return Integer.parseInt(value);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        throw new JsonSyntaxException(e);
    }
}

}

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