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I have this code:

// basic file operations
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    writeFile();
}

int writeFile () 
{
  ofstream myfile;
  myfile.open ("example.txt");
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile.close();
  return 0;
}

Why is this not working? it gives me the error:

1>------ Build started: Project: FileRead, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>  file.cpp
1>e:\documents and settings\row\my documents\visual studio 2010\projects\fileread\fileread\file.cpp(8): error C3861: 'writeFile': identifier not found
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

and this is just a simple function. I'm using Visual Studio 2010.

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marked as duplicate by Mooing Duck, Cassio Neri, Sara, itsme86, Mike Aug 9 '13 at 21:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why did you add the c tag when you're obviously writing C++ code? –  Cody Gray Jan 14 '12 at 16:25
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6 Answers 6

There are two solutions to this. You can either place the method above the method that calls it:

// basic file operations
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int writeFile () 
{
  ofstream myfile;
  myfile.open ("example.txt");
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile.close();
  return 0;
}

int main()
{
    writeFile();
}

Or declare a prototype:

// basic file operations
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int writeFile();

int main()
{
    writeFile();
}

int writeFile () 
{
  ofstream myfile;
  myfile.open ("example.txt");
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile << "Writing this to a file.\n";
  myfile.close();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i get the idea, there are so many languages, so it isn't public static void main() and public void functionName() ... hmm interesting ... and that part to put main() at the end is hilarious –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 16:30
2  
Why is it "hilarious" to put the main function at the end? And what in the world is public static void main()? What does that have to do with anything? –  Cody Gray Jan 14 '12 at 16:38
    
@Row Minds The essential idea here is that when you called writeFile() from main, the function writeFile has not been declared yet, hence the above solutions. –  Alexander Kondratskiy Jan 14 '12 at 18:25
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Your main doesn't know about writeFile() and can't call it.

Move writefile to be before main, or declare a function prototype int writeFile(); before main.

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You need to declare the prototype of your writeFile function, before actually using it:

int writeFile( void );

int main( void )
{
   ...
share|improve this answer
    
i get the idea, there are so many languages, so it isn't public static void main() and public void functionName() ... hmm interesting –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 16:30
    
Those are functions, not methods (class member functions). So there's no public concept here. static can be used for a function, meaning it will be private to the file. Note that you cannot do this for main, of course. –  Macmade Jan 14 '12 at 16:32
    
no public concept? how about public: and private: ? –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 16:35
    
Those specifiers can only be applied inside a class, in C++. Here, you don't have a class. Just functions, at the top-level. –  Macmade Jan 14 '12 at 16:38
    
i understand, it's strange ... btw, thanks –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 16:41
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This is a place in which C++ has a strange rule. Before being able to compile a call to a function the compiler must know the function name, return value and all parameters. This can be done by adding a "prototype". In your case this simply means adding before main the following line:

int writeFile();

this tells the compiler that there exist a function named writeFile that will be defined somewhere, that returns an int and that accepts no parameters.

Alternatively you can define first the function writeFile and then main because in this case when the compiler gets to main already knows your function.

Note that this requirement of knowing in advance the functions being called is not always applied. For example for class members defined inline it's not required...

struct Foo
{
    void bar()
    {
        if (baz() != 99)
            std::cout << "Hey!";
    }

    int baz()
    {
        return 42;
    }
};

In this case the compiler has no problem analyzing the definition of bar even if it depends on a function baz that is declared later in the source code.

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i understand, but it is a strange rule ... and think about any language has a lot of strange rules, damn ... –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 16:40
1  
@RowMinds: C++ is not the result of a clean white page design, but comes from a long history of evolution that even got through a committee (and this alone can remove beauty from anything). In many parts unfortunately the result is quite surprising and apparently illogical... this also means that you cannot trust your intuition when learning C++ and you must study it instead. It's a nice powerful language but its full of strange rules (that often are there just for historical reasons). –  6502 Jan 14 '12 at 17:07
    
i know C++ it's old, but seriously C++ <<<<<<<<<<< C# seriously ... –  Master345 Jan 14 '12 at 17:29
1  
@RowMinds: C++ is a lower-level language and one of the main design choices was to remain close enough to the metal to leave no room for another language above assembler. Many thinks C++ failed at that (as C is often used instead of C++ for lower level parts) but still this decision influenced much of the design. C# is an higher level language so it doesn't really make sense to compare the two... each of them is better at something; if you need only what C# is good at then go for C#. –  6502 Jan 14 '12 at 17:39
    
"as C is often used instead of C++ for lower level parts" -> the old C is very old, i won't use it at all .. –  Master345 Nov 12 '13 at 18:30
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Switch the order of the functions or do a forward declaration of the writefiles function and it will work I think.

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The function declaration int writeFile () ; seems to be missing in the code. Add int writeFile () ; before the function main()

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