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I am supposed to created a HashMap inside another HashMap as shown below which can store the value inside the inner HashMap based on the key of the outer HashMap at the runtime

i.e. required output for program should be of the format

   { 1 = {11 = "aaa",15 = "bbb"}, 2 = {13 = "ccc", 14 = "ddd"} }

where 1,2 are Key values for Outer HashMap.

Below is the Code provided for it Is there any better approach to improve performance

HashMap<Integer, HashMap<Integer, String>>Outer 
                   = new HashMap<Integer, HashMap<Integer,String>>();

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    int count = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
    for(int i =0;i<count;i++)
    {
        String input[] = br.readLine().split("\\s");

        //HashMap<Integer,String>inner = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        int key = Integer.parseInt(input[0]);
        if(Outer.isEmpty() || !Outer.containsKey(key))
        {
            HashMap<Integer, String> inner = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
            inner.put(Integer.parseInt(input[1]),input[2]);
            Outer.put(key, inner);
        }
        else if(Outer.containsKey(key))
            {
                HashMap<Integer, String> inner = (HashMap<Integer, String>) Outer.get(key).clone();
                inner.put(Integer.parseInt(input[1]), input[2]);
                Outer.put(key, inner);
            }
    }
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1  
Why do you think that you need to improve performance? Is this code taking an extraordinary amount of time to execute? –  Jeffrey Jan 14 '12 at 17:52
2  
I think using a two-level hashmap is more likely to reduce performance than increase it. –  Tom Anderson Jan 14 '12 at 18:05
    
While it isn't clear, it could be assumed from the question that the splitting into 2 maps is not for performance reasons. Note that the determination for which outer map to use is being read from the input - not another calculated hash. I think the question is aimed at improving the performance of the given implementation - which requires the use of nested maps. –  ziesemer Jan 14 '12 at 18:56
    
Firstly thanks all for the reply. I was implementing same feature to extract this datastructure to prefetch a data from database and as the number of elements for the inner Hashmap increases it would cause delay as clone is a Pre-defined method by java which cannot be twicked so i wanted to know if there can be some other better approach rather than depending on predefined method of java –  cryptonkid Jan 17 '12 at 18:59
    
@Vickki - If your two-level HashMap is not required by your data model, but is only done in an attempt for performance - I agree with Tom - there's more overhead here, and you'd be better off using a single HashMap. I'm not sure how clone() relates to this discussion, as you shouldn't even need it. The absolute best thing you can probably do to help performance, given the additional details you just provided, is to initialize the HashMap with an expected capacity, e.g. new HashMap(5000). If a proper value is chosen, this will prevent it from having to resize, as you probably observed. –  ziesemer Jan 17 '12 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Similar to Vadim's answer, but further improved - as it doesn't require a call to both containsKey as well as get:

Map<Integer, Map<Integer, String>> outer = new HashMap<Integer, Map<Integer, String>>();
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
int count = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());

Pattern splitter = Pattern.compile("\\s");

for(int i = 0; i < count; i++){
    String input[] = splitter.split(br.readLine());

    int key = Integer.parseInt(input[0]);

    Map<Integer, String> inner = outer.get(key);
    if(inner == null){
        inner = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        outer.put(key, inner);
    }
    inner.put(Integer.parseInt(input[1]), input[2]);
}

It also has some minor improvements for naming conventions, and use of the Collections interfaces instead of concrete types.

I also removed the call to clone. This could be a slight savings - and I don't think it would have given you your expected results.

Finally - one other thing that I changed that could be a slight improvement is using a pre-compiled Pattern for the splitting of your String into fields.

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Thanks ziesemer great tips to tweak –  cryptonkid Jan 17 '12 at 19:11

Your code is good enough from performance point of view. Only few things came to my mind. If/else condition can be simplified and you don't need to clone map in else part (work with pointer)

HashMap<Integer, HashMap<Integer, String>>Outer = new HashMap<Integer,   HashMap<Integer,String>>();
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
int count = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
for(int i =0;i<count;i++)
{
    String input[] = br.readLine().split("\\s");

    //HashMap<Integer,String>inner = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
    int key = Integer.parseInt(input[0]);
    if(!Outer.containsKey(key))
    {
        HashMap<Integer, String> inner = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        inner.put(Integer.parseInt(input[1]),input[2]);
        Outer.put(key, inner);
    }
    else
    {
        HashMap<Integer, String> inner = Outer.get(key);
        inner.put(Integer.parseInt(input[1]), input[2]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you tips vadim :) Great help indeed –  cryptonkid Jan 17 '12 at 19:12

Optimizing is nearly always a bad idea. Especially in Java where the JVM is quite good at doing that by itself.

Do you really need a Map<Integer, Map<Integer, String>>, it seems to me that you really just need a Map<Pair, String> where

public final class Pair {
  private final int x;
  private final int y;
  public Pair(int x, int y) { this.x = x; this.y = y;}
}

I am not claiming at all that this will improve performance, but it might be better design. I don't quite know what you are doing, so maybe it's not better design.

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