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I have just encountered this following code:

public class TestFinally {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int returnValue = function();

        System.out.println("Return value: " + returnValue);
    }

    public static int function() {
        try {
            return 1;
        } catch (Exception e){
            return 2;
        } finally{
            return 3;
        }
    }
}

It is without a doubt that running this code will yield an output of "Return value: 3".

However, I am curious as to:

  1. The mechanism of the innards in the JVM. Does anyone know if the VM actually replaces the return value on the stack by over-writing the first "return 1"? If so, where can I find more information on this.
  2. I have yet to find the use for a return in the finally mechanism that is used this way and allowed in the implemented in the JVM. If this code construct is used as a means to return error code, it is in my opinion there are better ways to log errors or return these error codes. Has anyone found a use for such a construct?

Many thanks in advance.

Cheers, Vern

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to 1.: no idea, i'd like to know that as well. to 2.: finally can be used to do thinks that absolutly need to be done, e.g. closing streams. I think exceptions are nicer than error codes, because you already see in the methods signature what might go wrong (without reading any documentation) and it is harder to just ignore them for the coder. –  tim Jan 14 '12 at 18:11
1  
Well, I can't really answer the first one, but the second seems pretty apparent. The finally clause is used to clean up (like close streams), which must happen even if the code returns. However, returning in a finally clause is bad practice anyway, just don't do it. –  Alexis King Jan 14 '12 at 18:13
    
I dont think you are ment to change return value within finnaly block, but why shoudl they on the other hand dossallow you to do it? But it's not a good pracice to do that. –  Hurda Jan 14 '12 at 18:15
    
Thanks all for the input. Yes, I realized that the question that I posted was not that clear. I have edited and clarified on the question. I am curious if anyone has seen such a code use, whereby a return is done in the try block and a second return is used in the finally block to override the try block's return value. Has anyone seen such a use? –  Vern Jan 14 '12 at 18:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

What I found in the Java language specification at least defines that your code snippet should return 3. Of course, it does not mention how the JVM should implement this, and what possible optimizations one could do.

Section 14.20.2 defines that

If execution of the try block completes abruptly for any other reason R, then the finally block is executed. Then there is a choice:

  1. If the finally block completes normally, then the try statement completes abruptly for reason R.
  2. If the finally block completes abruptly for reason S, then the try statement completes abruptly for reason S (and reason R is discarded).

And the start of chapter14 (section 14.1 to be more precise) specifies what a normal and abrupt completion is. For example a return with a given value is an abrupt completion.

Hence in this case, the finally block completes abruptly (reason: return with a given value), so the try will complete abruptly for the same reason (and return 3). This is confirmed in section 14.17 about the return statement as well

If evaluation of the Expression completes normally, producing a value V, then the return statement completes abruptly, the reason being a return with value V.

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Thanks for the links Robin. That was something that I was really looking for. This information coupled with the OpenJDK source code should yield quite some answers. Cheers! –  Vern Jan 15 '12 at 6:59

The implementation is up to the JVM, and there are many JVMs. You could dig into OpenJDK's source code to see how it implements finally, but this wouldn't be the only way to do it. As far as the language is concerned, the important thing is the behavior.

I don't understand point 2 -- why does finally exist? it is not as you suggest somehow just a means to return an error code. You don't have to return from within finally at all. The construct exists to ensure that some kind of clean-up code is run after some section of code no matter how it terminates, whether normally or via exception or return.

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Thanks for pointing me to the source code. I was just about to look into that. Cheers! –  Vern Jan 15 '12 at 6:57

FWIW, I get a warning on function:

public static int function(){
    try{
        return 1;
    }catch(Exception e){
        return 2;
    }finally{
        return 3; //WARNING on this line
    }
}

Ie. it tells me "finally block does not complete normally". I still get 3 as returned value no matter what.

Anyway, if I try this other example:

public class TestFinally {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int returnValue = function();

        System.out.println("Return value: " + returnValue);
    }

    public static int function() {
        try {  

            return 1;  
            }  
        catch (Exception e) {   
            return 2;  
            }  
        finally {  
            System.out.println("i don't know if this will get printed out.");
        }
    }
}

the output will be (obviously)

i don't know if this will get printed out.
Return value: 1

I have no idea how the JVM implements it, but the simplest way to look at it (at least conceptually) would be:

  1. the return value in the "try" is pushed onto the stack,
  2. then the "finally" block is executed,
  3. the new return value is pushed onto the stack
  4. the function exits, and the return value is popped from the stack, thus ignoring the first one.

Very neat question indeed.

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Fully explained Page:439=> http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/jls8.pdf

If evaluation of the Expression completes normally, producing a value V, then the return statement completes abruptly, the reason being a return with value V.

The preceding descriptions say "attempts to transfer control" rather than just "transfers control" because if there are any try statements (§14.20) within the method or constructor whose try blocks or catch clauses contain the return statement, then any finally clauses of those try statements will be executed, in order, innermost to outermost, before control is transferred to the invoker of the method or constructor. Abrupt completion of a finally clause can disrupt the transfer of control initiated by a return statement.

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