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I have an array of objects and I want to compare those objects on a specific object property. Here's my array -

var myArray = 
[
{"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
{"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
{"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
{"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

I'd like to zero in on the "cost" specifically and a get a min and maximum value. I realize I can just grab the cost values and push them off into a javascript array and then run the Fast JavaScript Max/Min.

However is there an easier way to do this by bypassing the array step in the middle and going off the objects properties (in this case "Cost") directly?

share|improve this question
up vote 28 down vote accepted

The fastest way, in this case, is looping through all elements, and compare it to the highest/lowest value, so far.

(Creating an array, invoking array methods is overkill for this simple operation).

 // There's no real number bigger than plus Infinity
var lowest = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
var highest = Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
var tmp;
for (var i=myArray.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
    tmp = myArray[i].Cost;
    if (tmp < lowest) lowest = tmp;
    if (tmp > highest) highest = tmp;
}
console.log(highest, lowest);
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense, I've been stuck with thinking about comparing data inside the array to each other instead of an external high/low number. – firedrawndagger Jan 14 '12 at 19:01
1  
The only thing I would change is setting lowest and highest is a bit redundant. I would rather loop one less time and set lowest=highest=myArray[0] and then start the loop at 1. – 32bitkid Jan 14 '12 at 19:13
1  
@32bitkid Good point. should be myArray[0].Cost, though. But, if there's no first element, an error will be thrown. So, an additional check is needed, possibly undoing the small performance boost. – Rob W Jan 14 '12 at 19:17
    
I came here because I want the object itself returned. Not the lowest value, which was easy. Any suggestions? – Wilt Mar 11 '14 at 8:48
    
@Wilt Yes, maintain another variable that gets updated when you've found a lowest value, i.e. var lowestObject; for (...) and if (tmp < lowest) { lowestObject = myArray[i]; lowest = tmp; } – Rob W Mar 11 '14 at 8:58

The reduce is good for stuff like this: to perform aggregate operations (like min, max, avg, etc.) on an array of objects, and return a single result:

myArray.reduce(function(prev, curr) {
    return prev.Cost < curr.Cost ? prev : curr;
}

If you want to be cute you can attach this to array:

Array.prototype.hasMin = function(attrib) {
    return this.reduce(function(prev, curr){ 
        return prev[attrib] < curr[attrib] ? prev : curr; 
    });
 }

Now you can just say:

myArray.hasMin('ID')  // result:  {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200}
myArray.hasMin('Cost')    // result: {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50}
share|improve this answer
5  
Best answer in my opinion. It doesn't modify the array and its far more concise than the answer that says "Creating an array, invoking array methods is overkill for this simple operation" – Julian Mann Sep 16 '15 at 19:43
    
This is the absolute best answer for performance of large datasets (30+ columns / 100k rows). – cerd May 11 at 15:03

Use sort, if you don't care about the array being modified.

myArray.sort(function (a, b) {
    return a.Cost - b.Cost
})

var min = myArray[0],
    max = myArray[myArray.length - 1]
share|improve this answer
1  
a full sort isn't the fastest way to find min/max but i guess it'll work. – 32bitkid Jan 14 '12 at 18:46
3  
Just be aware that this will modify myArray, which may not be expected. – ziesemer Jan 14 '12 at 18:46

I think Rob W's answer is really the right one (+1), but just for fun: if you wanted to be "clever", you could do something like this:

var myArray = 
[
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

function finder(cmp, arr, attr) {
    var val = arr[0][attr];
    for(var i=1;i<arr.length;i++) {
        val = cmp(val, arr[i][attr])
    }
    return val;
}

alert(finder(Math.max, myArray, "Cost"));
alert(finder(Math.min, myArray, "Cost"));

or if you had a deeply nested structure, you could get a little more functional and do the following:

var myArray = 
[
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": { "Wholesale":200, Retail: 250 }},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": { "Wholesale":1000, Retail: 1010 }},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": { "Wholesale":50, Retail: 300 }},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": { "Wholesale":500, Retail: 1050 }}
]

function finder(cmp, arr, getter) {
    var val = getter(arr[0]);
    for(var i=1;i<arr.length;i++) {
        val = cmp(val, getter(arr[i]))
    }
    return val;
}

alert(finder(Math.max, myArray, function(x) { return x.Cost.Wholesale; }));
alert(finder(Math.min, myArray, function(x) { return x.Cost.Retail; }));

These could easily be curried into more useful/specific forms.

share|improve this answer
3  
I have benchmarked our solutions: jsperf.com/comparison-of-numbers. After optimizing your code (see the benchmark), the performance of both methods are similar. Without optimization, my method is 14x faster. – Rob W Jan 14 '12 at 19:12
1  
@RoBW oh I would totally expect your version to be way faster, I was just providing an alternate architectural implementation. :) – 32bitkid Jan 14 '12 at 19:14
    
@32bitkid I expected the same, but surprisongly, the method is almost as fast (after optimizing), as seen at test case 3 of the benchmark. – Rob W Jan 14 '12 at 19:16
1  
@RobW i agree, I would not have expected that. I'm intrigued. :) Goes to show that you should always benchmark rather than assume. – 32bitkid Jan 14 '12 at 19:16
    
@RobW Just to be clear though, I think with more browser results, your implementation would consistently beat either the unoptimized and optimized versions. – 32bitkid Jan 14 '12 at 19:21

Use Math functions and pluck out the values you want with map.

Here is the jsbin:

https://jsbin.com/necosu/1/edit?js,console

var myArray = [{
    "ID": 1,
    "Cost": 200
  }, {
    "ID": 2,
    "Cost": 1000
  }, {
    "ID": 3,
    "Cost": 50
  }, {
    "ID": 4,
    "Cost": 500
  }],

  min = Math.min.apply(null, myArray.map(function(item) {
    return item.Cost;
  })),
  max = Math.max.apply(null, myArray.map(function(item) {
    return item.Cost;
  }));

console.log('min', min);//50
console.log('max', max);//1000

UPDATE:

If you want to use ES6:

var min = Math.min.apply(null, myArray.map(item => item.Cost)),
    max = Math.max.apply(null, myArray.map(item => item.Cost));
share|improve this answer

Using Array.prototype.reduce(), you can plug in comparator functions to determine the min, max, etc. item in an array.

var items = [
  { name : 'Apple',  count : 3  },
  { name : 'Banana', count : 10 },
  { name : 'Orange', count : 2  },
  { name : 'Mango',  count : 8  }
];

function findBy(arr, key, comparatorFn) {
  return arr.reduce(function(prev, curr, index, arr) { 
    return comparatorFn.call(arr, prev[key], curr[key]) ? prev : curr; 
  });
}

function minComp(prev, curr) {
  return prev < curr;
}

function maxComp(prev, curr) {
  return prev > curr;
}

document.body.innerHTML  = 'Min: ' + findBy(items, 'count', minComp).name + '<br />';
document.body.innerHTML += 'Max: ' + findBy(items, 'count', maxComp).name;

share|improve this answer

You can use built-in Array object to use Math.max/Math.min instead:

var arr = [1,4,2,6,88,22,344];

var max = Math.max.apply(Math, arr);// return 344
var min = Math.min.apply(Math, arr);// return 1
share|improve this answer

This is more better solution

    var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
    ]
    var lowestNumber = myArray[0].Cost;
    var highestNumber = myArray[0].Cost;

    myArray.forEach(function (keyValue, index, myArray) {
      if(index > 0) {
        if(keyValue.Cost < lowestNumber){
          lowestNumber = keyValue.Cost;
        }
        if(keyValue.Cost > highestNumber) {
          highestNumber = keyValue.Cost;
        }
      }
    });
    console.log('lowest number' , lowestNumber);
    console.log('highest Number' , highestNumber);
share|improve this answer

Another one, similar to Kennebec's answer, but all in one line:

maxsort = myArray.slice(0).sort(function (a, b) { return b.ID - a.ID })[0].ID; 
share|improve this answer

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