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I am having a problem writing to a .xml file inside of my jar. When I use the following code inside of my Netbeans IDE, no error occurs and it writes to the file just fine.

public void saveSettings(){
    Properties prop = new Properties();
    FileOutputStream out;
    try {
        File file = new File(Duct.class.getResource("/Settings.xml").toURI());
        out = new FileOutputStream(file);
        prop.setProperty("LAST_FILE", getLastFile());
        try {
            prop.storeToXML(out,null);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, e.toString());
        }
        try {
            out.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, e.toString());
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, e.toString());
    }
}

However, when I execute the jar I get an error saying:

IllegalArguementException: uri is not hierachal

Does anyone have an idea of why it's working when i run it in Netbeans, but not working when i execute the jar. Also does anyone have a solution to the problem?

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3  
to put it simply you cant write inside zip/jar files w/o rebuilding them. look at java.util.zip.ZipFile. In NetBeans most likely you run the application from the file system, not packed inside the jar. –  bestsss Jan 14 '12 at 20:25
    
@bestsss: So what would be a solution to saving settings? Place the file in some other location unrelated to the jar? –  Michael Rentmeister Jan 14 '12 at 20:28
    
@MichaelRentmeister Use the Preferences API? –  Dave Newton Jan 14 '12 at 20:29
1  
Yes, @Michael, consider jar/zip read-only mostly. Yes you can use the user directory and create the file there. Or (better) use java.util.prefs.Preferences, it's almost like properties file :) –  bestsss Jan 14 '12 at 20:31
    
Ah Preferences worked great! Thanks very much =) –  Michael Rentmeister Jan 14 '12 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

The default class loader expects the classpath to be static (so it can cache heavily), so this approach will not work.

You can put Settings.xml in the file system if you can get a suitable location to put it. This is most likely vendor and platform specific, but can be done.

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3  
user.home is always available and it's not vendor dependent. Also it should be writable. –  bestsss Jan 14 '12 at 20:43
    
Not for servlet code, or things running as a service. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 14 '12 at 22:21
    
the code uses swing and servlet code can use "user.home", unsigned applets can't. sure java can always have security restrictions but that's far beyond the point if you deploy the application yourself. –  bestsss Jan 14 '12 at 22:42

Add the location of the Settings.xml to the classpath.

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I was also struggling with this exception. But finally found out the solution.

When you use .toURI() it returns some thing like

D:/folderName/folderName/Settings.xml

and hence you get the exception "URI is not hierarchical"

To avoid this call the method getPath() on the URI returned, which returns something like

/D:/folderName/folderName/Settings.xml

which is now hierarchical.

In your case, the 5th line in your code should be

File file = new File(Duct.class.getResource("/Settings.xml").toURI().getPath());
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