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I have a div tag which contains text, and I want to align the contents of this div vertically center.

Here is my div style:

#box
{
  height: 90px;
  width: 270px;
  background: #000;
  font-size: 48px;
  font-style: oblique;
  color: #FFF;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 20px;
  margin-left: 5px;
}
<div Id="box">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
</div>

What is the best way to do this?

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1  
possible duplicate of How do I center text vertically with css –  leonbloy Jan 14 '12 at 21:38
    

14 Answers 14

up vote 867 down vote accepted

You can try this basic approach:

#box {
  height: 90px;
  line-height: 90px;
}

Demo

Only works for a single line of text though, because we set the line's height to the same height as the containing box element.


A more versatile approach

And here is another way to align text vertically, this solution will work for a single line and multiple lines of text, but still requires a fixed height container:

<div>
  <span>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</span>
</div>

The CSS just sizes the <div>, then vertically center aligns the <span> by setting the <div>'s line-height equal to its height, and making the <span> an inline-block with vertical-align: middle. Then it sets the line-height back to normal for the <span> so its contents will flow naturally inside the block.

div {
  width: 250px;
  height: 100px;
  line-height: 100px;
  text-align: center;
}

span {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  line-height: normal;      
}

Demo


Simulating table display

And here is another option, which may not work on older browsers that don't support display: table and display: table-cell (basically that means Internet Explorer 7). The HTML is the same as the second example:

<div>
  <span>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</span>
</div>

Using CSS we 'simulate' table display behavior, since tables support vertical alignment:

div {
  display: table;
  width: 250px;
  height: 100px;
  text-align: center;
}

span {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

Demo


Using absolute positioning

This technique uses an absolutely positioned element setting top, bottom, left and right to 0. It is described in more detail in an article on Smashing Magazine.

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11  
This is not best practice. –  Travis J Jan 14 '12 at 21:31
20  
Because it goes wrong if the div or text changes or more content is added. –  Rob Jan 14 '12 at 22:01
8  
But this is what he said, if you know how much text you will use its perfectly acceptable... the solution below is however more flexible –  acSlater Sep 11 '12 at 16:05
4  
How can I achieve same goal with div's height set to: "height: 100%;" ? –  Fedor Aug 1 '13 at 11:46
4  
The table-cell technique is pretty cool, but the content is then resized to fit the parent container. Here's an awesome technique from CSS Tricks, using the pseudo-element before: css-tricks.com/centering-in-the-unknown . The content isn't resized this way, but it only works in IE8+. –  Ian Campbell Oct 3 '13 at 20:20

Another way (not mentioned here yet) is with Flexbox.

Just add the following code to the container element:

display: flex;
justify-content: center; /* align horizontal */
align-items: center; /* align vertical */

FIDDLE

.box {
  height: 150px;
  width: 400px;
  background: #000;
  font-size: 24px;
  font-style: oblique;
  color: #FFF;
  text-align: center;
  padding: 0 20px;
  margin: 20px;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  /* align horizontal */
  align-items: center;
  /* align vertical */
}
<div class="box">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh
</div>

A good place to start with Flexbox to see some of it's features and get syntax for maximum browser support is flexyboxes

Also, browser support nowadays is quite good: caniuse

For cross-browser compatibility for display: flex and align-items, you can use the following:

display: -webkit-box;
display: -webkit-flex;
display: -moz-box;
display: -ms-flexbox;
display: flex;
-webkit-flex-align: center;
-ms-flex-align: center;
-webkit-align-items: center;
align-items: center;
share|improve this answer
14  
Flexbox support table –  user Mar 7 '14 at 18:25
2  
+1 this works well when divs take up the entire width of the screen –  Andrew Bringaze Jul 9 '14 at 13:29
1  
This works well for me too, the rest of the above not working on my site. But visual studio does not recognize display: flex. –  Antonio Ooi Aug 21 '14 at 11:41
2  
IE = we can never have nice things –  Andrew Hoffman Mar 9 at 16:35
3  
This is the best solution ever. I've searched for many solutions this works best and it is simple. –  alexhilton Apr 13 at 16:01

You can easity do this by adding the following piece of CSS code:

display: table-cell;
vertical-align: middle;

Thats means your CSS finally looks like :

#box {
    height: 90px;
    width: 270px;
    background: #000;
    font-size: 48px;
    font-style: oblique;
    color: #FFF;
    text-align: center;
    margin-top: 20px;
    margin-left: 5px;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

jsfiddle here

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1  
Looks like that kills the margin attributes, though. –  Tim Gostony Jan 14 '12 at 21:34
4  
Note that this solution does not support IE7 –  mrtsherman Jan 14 '12 at 23:00
6  
Works great until you apply a float :( –  Costa Nov 27 '12 at 3:52
48  
@mrtsherman Or rather, IE7 does not support this solution. ;-) –  James McLaughlin May 11 '13 at 18:32
    
@Costa -- You may have to float the parent div as well, if you are floating something inside of this div... check out stackoverflow.com/questions/2062258/… –  Ian Campbell Jan 4 '14 at 20:03

For reference and to add a simpler answer:

Pure CSS:

.vertical-align {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}

Or as a SASS/SCSS Mixin:

@mixin vertical-align {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}

Use By:

.class-to-center {
    @include vertical-align;
}

** Update by Sebastian Ekström **

As a few people have pointed out, this method can cause elements to be blurry due to the element being placed on a “half pixel”. A solution for this is to set its parent element to preserve-3d. Like following:

.parent-element {
  -webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d;
  -moz-transform-style: preserve-3d;
  transform-style: preserve-3d;
}

** EDIT **

We live in 2015+ and flexbox is supported by every major modern browser.

It will be the way websites are made from here on out.

LEARN IT!

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2  
I am surprised that no one up votes this amazing CSS. +1 –  Daniel Cheung Feb 8 at 13:14

All credit goes to this link owner @Sebastian Ekström Link; please go through this. See it in action codepen. By reading the above article I also created a demo fiddle.

With just three lines of CSS (excluding vendor prefixes) we can do it with the help of a transform: translateY vertically centers whatever we want, even if we don’t know its height.

The CSS property transform is usually used for rotating and scaling elements, but with its translateY function we can now vertically align elements. Usually this must be done with absolute positioning or setting line-heights, but these require you to either know the height of the element or only works on single-line text, etc.

So, to do this we write:

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
} 

That’s all you need. It is a similar technique to the absolute-position method, but with the upside that we don’t have to set any height on the element or position-property on the parent. It works straight out of the box, even in Internet Explorer 9!

To make it even more simple, we can write it as a mixin with its vendor prefixes.

share|improve this answer
    
I've done minimal testing, but seems to work for me! –  Iain Collins Aug 20 '14 at 11:39
    
changing the font size it moves all over the place –  Jon49 Aug 28 '14 at 17:53

Flexible approach

See: http://jsfiddle.net/v5tc0ga3/

div {
    width: 250px;
    min-height: 50px;
    line-height: 50px;
    text-align: center;
    border: 1px solid #123456;
    margin-bottom: 5px;
}
span {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    line-height: normal;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best solution –  Mehmet Eren Yener Jul 25 at 14:49

The solution accepted as answer is perfect to use line-height same as height of div, but this solution not works perfect when text is wrapped OR is in two lines.

Try this one if text is wrapped or is on multiple line inside a div.

#box
{
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

For more reference, see

Vertically Center Multi-Lined Text

6 Methods For Vertical Centering With CSS

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I needed a row of clickable elephants, vertically centered, but without using a table to get around some IE9 weirdness. I eventually found the nicest CSS (for my needs) and it's great in FF, Chrome, and IE11 .. sadly IE9 is still laughing at me :( Someone might find this handy...

<style type="text/css">
  div  { border:1px dotted blue;  display:inline;        line-height:100px;   height:100px; }
  span { border:1px solid red;    display:inline-block;  line-height:normal;  vertical-align:middle; }
  .out { border:3px solid silver; display:inline-block;  }
</style>

<div class="out" onclick="alert(1)">
  <div> <span><img src="http://www.birdfolk.co.uk/littleredsolo.png"/></span> </div>
  <div> <span>A lovely clickable option.</span> </div>
</div>

<div class="out" onclick="alert(2)">
  <div> <span><img src="http://www.birdfolk.co.uk/bang2/Ship01.png"/></span> </div>
  <div> <span>something Charming to click on.</span> </div>
</div>

(Obviously you don't need the borders, but they can help you see how it works!)

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I would just like to extend the answer from @michielvoo in order to release need for line-height and breathing of div height. It is basically just simplified version like this:

HTML:

<div>
  <span>All grown-ups were once children... but only few of them remember it</span>
</div>

and CSS:

div {
  width: 250px;
  /* height: 100px;
  line-height: 100px; */
  text-align: center;
}

span {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;    
  line-height: normal;
}

NOTE: commented out part of CSS is needed for fixed-height of enclosing div. Here is a Fiddle example

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The simple and versatile way is (as michielvoo table approach):

[ctrv]{
    display:table !important;
}

[ctrv] > *{ /* adressing direct discendents */
      display:table-cell;
      vertical-align: middle;
      // text-align: center; /* optional */
}

Using this attribute (or a equivalent class) on a parent tag works even for many childs to align:

<parent ctrv>  <ch1/>  <ch2/>   </parent>
share|improve this answer
.element{position: relative;top: 50%;transform: translateY(-50%);}

Add this small code in the CSS property of your element. It is awesome. Try it!

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Another way:

Don't set the height attribute of the div, but instead use padding: to achieve the effect. Similarly to line-height, it only works if you have one line of text. Although this way, if you have more content, the text will still be centered, but the div itself will be slightly larger.

So instead of going with:

div {
  height:120px;
  line-height: 120px;
}

You can say:

div {
   padding: 60px 0; //Maybe 60 minus font-size divided by two, if you want to be  exact
}

This will set the top and bottom padding of the div to 60px, and the left and right padding to zero, making the div 120px (plus the height of your font) high, and placing the text vertically centered in the div.

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For a single line of text (or a single character) you can use this technique:

It can be used when #box has non-fixed, relative height in %.

<div id="box"></div>

#box::before {
    display: block;
    content: "";
    height: 50%;
}

#box::after {
    vertical-align: top;
    line-height: 0;
    content: "TextContent";
}

See live demo at JsBin (easier to edit CSS) or JsFiddle (easier to change height of result frame).

If you want to place inner text in HTML, not in CSS, then you need to wrap text content in additional inline element and edit #box::after to match it. (And, of course, content: property should be removed.)
For example,
<div id="box"><span>TextContent</span></div>
In this case #box::after should be replaced to #box span.

For IE8 support you must replace :: with :.

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A better, easier, responsive approach is to set margin-top in CSS to around 45%:

margin-top: 45%;

You might have to play with that number, but it will be in the center of the surrounding div.

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protected by Hashem Qolami Sep 20 '14 at 19:50

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