Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was just wondering if the following way is a good one for building a jQuery plugin and if not which are the best practices:

$.fn.loginsys = function(options) {

    var opts = $.extend({}, $.fn.loginsys.defaults, options);

    return this.each(function() {

        /* Code To Be Executed */

    });

}

$.fn.loginsys.defaults = {

    /* Some Options */

}
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by PreferenceBean, ThinkingStiff, Qantas 94 Heavy, Andrew, rolandjitsu Feb 28 '14 at 8:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you want the user to be able to change the default options? – pimvdb Jan 14 '12 at 22:43
    
Yes, I do want that. – rolandjitsu Jan 14 '12 at 23:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I will suggestm this from jquery tutorial plugin (but there are several way):

(function($) 
{   
    var globalSettings=
    {
        width:400,
        height:400
    };

    var methods =
    {
        init : function(options)
        {
            return this.each(function() 
            {
                var $this=$(this);
                var settings=$.extend({}, globalSettings, options);

                //your code

            });
        },
        destroy : function()
        {
            return this.each(function()
            {

            });
        },
        option : function(option, value)
        {

            if(value!=null && value!=undefined)
            {
                return this.each(function(){
                    var $this=$(this);
                    var curr_setts=$this.data('settings');
                    curr_setts[option]=value;
                    $this.data('settings',curr_setts);
                });
            }
            else
            {
                var $this=$(this);
                var curr_setts=$this.data('settings');
                return curr_setts[option];
            }
        }
    };

    $.fn.siter=function(method, options) 
    {
        if(methods[method])
        {
            return methods[method].apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        }
        else if(typeof method === 'object' || !method)
        {
            return methods.init.apply(this, arguments);
        }
        else
        {
            $.error('Method ' + method + ' does not exist on jQuery');
        }
    };

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
1  
Opening braces should never be put on new lines to avoid automatic semicolon insertion (--> premature termination of multiline statements/declarations). Plus, it's ugly. – Flo Jan 14 '12 at 22:54
    
you are really old, there are several way of writing code and this, in my opinion, is the most readable way. it has also a particular name – albanx Jan 14 '12 at 23:34
    
I have a question regarding this way of writing a plugin, I have found in other plugins something like this jQuery.fn.reverse = Array.prototype.reverse; at the beginning of it, what does that stand for ? – rolandjitsu Jan 14 '12 at 23:51
    
it seems to be a array conversion method, a minimal demo Array.prototype.reverse is a function and the plugin reverse does exactly what this function do – albanx Jan 15 '12 at 9:54
(function( $ ) {
  $.fn.myPlugin = function() {

    // Do your awesome plugin stuff here

  };
})( jQuery );

More info here: http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring

share|improve this answer

Best practice and everything aside, is there a reason for wanting to expose the defaults?

If you want them to be editable from the outside you may want to expose a setter for that instead and keep them inside of the $.fn.loginsys = function closure, so as to make sure they can't be fiddled with in a way that would stop your plugin from working.

See jQuery's ajaxSettings() for example.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a good idea, is @albanx code example a good idea and can the options be edited outside the plugin ? – rolandjitsu Jan 14 '12 at 23:18

I think you're just missing the wrapper

(function($) {

    // plugin code here

})(jQuery);

But, there are many plugin patterns out there; here are a bunch of templates available for downloading.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will take a look over all the templates :) – rolandjitsu Jan 14 '12 at 23:43

There are several good tutorials on how to write jQuery plugins, like http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2011/10/11/essential-jquery-plugin-patterns/. Just google a bit. Also, take a look at how other jQuery plugins are constructed. That's where you can learn the most I think.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.