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for example suppose that we have the classes A, B, C, D, E

now A has a public static int variable

I want this variable to be visible only in A and B classes, not in C,D,E.

Is it possible to do this, without making the variable protected and using inheritance?

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1  
No, it's public. –  Dave Newton Jan 14 '12 at 22:50
1  
What are you trying to achieve by doing this? –  Salman Paracha Jan 14 '12 at 22:53

6 Answers 6

aVar and bVar are public and static but only accessible from classes A and B (and AB).

`

public class AB
{
          private static class A
           {
                       public static int aVar ;
            }


           private static class B
           {
                        public static int bVar ;
           }
}

`

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Put classes A and B in their own package, and give the field default (package) visibility. (Don't give it a public, protected or private specifier).

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What you can do is to throw A and B in a separate package and make the variable only visible to the members of the package. To do that you just have to leave away the visibility keyword (e.g. public or protected). The default visibility for variables in Java is package.

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If you don't use any visibility modifier, the member will have package level visibility and you could put A and B in the same package and C, D, E in a different package.

However, there's a definite code smell here...

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+1 for the odor. –  Brian Roach Jan 14 '12 at 22:58

It not possible. If Class B is only be class A you could use a inner class.

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it is possible. the real question is is it worthwhile –  emory Jan 15 '12 at 2:27

You have to have a static getter. Inside that getter, you can throw an Exception, catch it, check the caller and then grant access or throw an access denied exception.

Other than that, the answer lies in inheritance and other well-known OO solutions.

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1  
That sounds like an extremely smelly, hacked way to implement this. Do not recommend. –  Matt Ball Jan 14 '12 at 22:52
2  
I don't approve of this answer, but at least use Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace() instead of throwing exceptions. –  Philipp Reichart Jan 14 '12 at 22:53
    
Well me neither. But why would you go against the definition of a public static variable in the first place? The whole question sounds fishy to me. –  Milad Naseri Jan 14 '12 at 22:53
    
@PhilippReichart Good idea. Forgot about Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace() completely. –  Milad Naseri Jan 14 '12 at 22:54
    
You don't need to throw and catch the exception, all you need to do is create it. (new Exception()).getStackTrace() is actually what Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace() uses. @PhilippReichart –  Jeffrey Jan 14 '12 at 23:20

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